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Full text of "Annual reports"

THREE HUNDREDTWENTY-SECOND 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 




FDR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1972 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1972medf 



322nd ANNIVERSARY 




ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Jn m 



em or i am 




WARREN H. LOVELACE 



IN MEMORIAM 



HARRY R. LEIGHTON 
Water and Sewerage Board — 1948-1972 

WARREN H. LOVELACE 
Finance Committee — 1965-1971 

CARL E. SANDBERG 
Civil Defense — 1971-1972 

ORRIN E. WILKINS 

Board of Appeals — 1952-1955 

Finance Committee — 1954 

Council on Aging — 1972 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 

Population as of January 1, 1971 : 9,875. 

Assessed Valuation 1972: S62.81 1,145.00. 

Tax Rate 1972: $53.00. 

Area: 14.43 Square Miles. Miles of Highway: 56 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 

Medfield is in the folowing Voting Districts: 

Representative to Congress — 10th Congressional District 

Margaret M. Heckler, 30 Colburn Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Governor's Councillor — 2nd District 

Herbert L. Connolly, 80 Claremont St., Newton, Mass. 

State Senator — Middlesex and Norfolk District 

David H. Locke, 15 Ordway Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

State Representative — 10th Norfolk District 

Charles W. Long, 106 Pond St., Westwood, Mass. 

United States Senators 

Edward W. Brooke 

Edward M. Kennedy 

J. F. Kennedy Memorial Building, Boston, Mass. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OFFICERS 
Moderator 

Charles F. Woodward Term expires 1973 

Town Clerk 

Nancy J. Preston Term expires 1973 

Treasurer 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 



Weston G. Kolsti 
Harry A. Kelleher 
Joseph L. Marcionette 



Joseph S. Kennedy 
Roger E. Hardy 
Melville J. Mills 



Dawn I. Austin 
James D. Sullivan 
Gordon W. Thomas 
Philip J. Burr 
Sonya J. Siders 



Selectmen 



Assessors 



School Committee 



Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1973 

Term expires 1974 

Term expires 1974 

Term expires 1975 

Term expires 1975 



Trustees of the Public Library 



Edward P. Jenkins 
Kenneth G. Fettig 
James F. Barton 
Lucile F. Sturtevant 
Mary M. Hay 
Laura H. Smith 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 



1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 
1975 
1975 



Collector of Taxes 



Charles H. Rayncr, Jr. 



William F. Rogers 
Robert A. Vanslette 
F. Gordon Yarlott 
Burgess P. Standley 
Sandra G. Munsey 



Planning Board 



Park Commissioners 



Brian A. Byrne 
Andrew F. Thompson, Jr. 
Robert H. Luke, Jr. 
Edward M. Bayliss, Jr. 
Warren F. Sheard 



Housing Authority 



David R. Iverson 
Herbert B. Burr 
Charles D. Sloan 
Richard C. J. Palson 



Fire Chief 

Joseph E. Ryan 

Chief of Police 

William H. Mann 



Term expires 1974 



Term expires 1973 

Term expires 1974 

Term expires 1975 

Term expires 1976 

Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1973 
Term expires 1973 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1974 
Term expires 1975 



Term expires 1973 

Term expires 1974 

Term expires 1975 

Term expires 1976 



E. Nina Iafolla 



Sergeants 

George W. Kingsbury 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick W. Clancy 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Patrolmen 



George F. Knehr 

John F. McCarthy, resigned 

Robert B. Ripley 

Robert D. Roy 

Raymond J. Wheeler 



■6 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 
Executive Secretary 

Frederick C. Conley Term expires 1973 

Superintendent of Streets 

William E. McCarthy 

Board of Health 

Francis X. Curry Term expires 1973 

Gerard F. Gallagher Term expires 1974 

Frederic C. Temple Term expires 1975 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. Term expires 1973 

Allison T. Carr Term expires 1974 

Joseph A. Roberts Term expires 1975 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Harry R. Leighton Deceased 

John R. Williams Term expires 1973 

John C. Willis Term expires 1974 

Kenneth W. Macek Term expires 1975 

Arthur L. Farrar, Associate Member Term expires 1974 

Allen F. Holmes, Associate Member Term expires 1974 

Tree Warden 

Ellis N._ Allen Term expires 1973 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Ellis N. Allen 

FIELD DRIVERS AND FENCE VIEWERS 
Rebel Palumbo Herbert B. Burr 



Inspector of Animals 

r 

Richard A. Ellsworth 

Pound Keeper 

William S. Blanchard 

Dog Officer 

Howard L. Kilmer 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Richard A. Ellsworth 

Measurer of Wood and Bark 

J. Hardy Henderson 

Public Weigher 

Richard A. Ellsworth 

Official Keeper of the Town Clock 

Austin C. Buchanan 

Constables 

William M. Anderson George W. Kingsbury 

Peter Bartkewicz George F. Knehr 

Richard D. Bishop Ralph G. Knowles 

Robert W. Brady William H. Mann 

Patrick W. Clancy John F. McCarthy, resigned 

John T. Garvey, Jr. Robert E. Naughton 

E. Nina Iafolla Robert B. Ripley 

Robert W. Feltmate Robert D. Roy 

Ronald E. Kerr Raymond J. Wheeler 



Keepers of the Lock-Up 



William M. Anderson George W. Kingsbury 

Anthony A. Bertone George F. Knehr 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Vincent Cellucci 
Patrick W. Clancy 
Robert W. Feltmate 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
E. Nina Iafolla 
Ronald E. Kerr 



Ralph G. Knowles 
William H. Mann 
John F. McCarthy, resigned 
Robert E. Naught on 
Robert B. Ripley 
Robert D. Roy 
David S. Sloan 
Raymond J. Wheeler 



Police Matrons 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Elisabeth Mann 
Alida B. Myette 



Mary T. Nyren 
Sarah J. R,egan 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Marie E. St. Pierre 
Mary L. Solari 



Traffic Supervisors 



Joyce Johnson 

Amelia Kennedy, resigned 

Priscilla Mahoney 

Elisabeth T. Mann 

Linda J. Matarazzo 

Alida B. Myette 

Sarah J. Regan 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Marie E. St. Pierre 

Mary L. Solari 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 



1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 



Temporary Intermittent Patrolmen 



William M. Anderson 
Anthony A. Bertone 
Vincent Cellucci 
Michael J. Donahue 



Robert W r . Feltmate 
Ralph G. Knowles 
Robert E. Naughton 
David S. Sloan 
Robert D. Taylor 



Special Police Officers 



William H. Anderson 
James O. Aronson 
Albert Baima 
Elton Bassett 
Allan K. Belcher 
Anthony A. Bertone 
Thomas A. Blake 



Frank X. Hines 
Frank J. Hoffman 
Ercole Iafolla 
Russell H. Johnston, Jr. 
James T. Kashalena 
Howard L. Kilmer 
Robert Kreger 



William S. Blanchard 

William H. Bowman 
Leo Brcnnan 
Robert E. Brodeur 
Chester A. Burks 
Herbert B. Burr 
I lerbert L. Burr 
Richard Cantrell 
William Carlson 
Joseph Carvalho 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Michael J. Donahue 
Richard A. Ellsworth 
John D. Farrell 
Robert W. Feltmate 
Arnold U. Giard 
EHwin Graves 
John T. Grover 
Joseph Harkins 
George W. Hinkley 
Vincent Hallowell 



John Kubacki 
William J. Marchand, Jr. 
Thomas Matthews 
Robert McGrath 
Thomas W. McNeelcy, Jr. 
Hugh Mick 
James H. Morris 
James E. Morris 
Frank Newell 
Norman F. Page 
Mario Pederzini 
Harold Pritoni 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Walter F. Reynolds, Sr. 
Joseph E. Ryan 
George St. Pierre 
George E. Smith, Jr. 
Melvin Thibeau 
John E. Varnum, Jr. 
Alfred C. Vasaturo 
Thomas Watson 



Leslie J. Howlett 



Town Accountant 
Town Counsel 

Charles Fuller, Jr. 

Veterans 7 Agent 

Paul F. Curran 

Veterans' Director 

Paul F. Curran 

Veterans' Grave Officer 

G. Marshall Chick 

Burial Agent 

Paul F. Curran 



Term expires 1974 



10 



Board of Registrar of Voters 

Beatrice Bangs Term expires 1973 

John F. Ganley Term expires 1974 

Mary I. MairEtienne Term expires 1975 

Building Inspector 

Herbert B. Burr Term expires June 2, 1975 

Acting Building Inspector 

Rebel Palumbo Term expires April 4, 1974 

Plumbing Inspector 

George E. Nye 
J. Roger Petrie, resigned 

Acting Plumbing Inspector 

Walter R. Nye 

Wiring Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine Term expires 1973 

Acting Wire Inspector 

Thomas O'Toole Term expires 1973 

Gas Inspector 

Walter R. Nye Term expires 1973 

Acting Gas Inspector 

George E. Nye Term expires 1973 

J. Roger Petrie, resigned 



11 



Board of Appeals for Zoning, Subdivision 
Control and Building By-Laws 

James O. Aronson Term expires 1973 

Ralph C. Copeland, Associate Member Term expires 1973 

Charles Kenny Term expires 1974 

James T. Regan Term expires 1975 

Board of Appeals for Zoning Enforcing Officer 

Herbert B. Burr Term expires 1973 

Development and Industrial Commission 

Clayton H. Haigh Term expires 1974 

John O. Ekstrom Term expires 1975 

Director of Civil Defense 

Austin C. Buchanan 

Deputy Director of Civil Defense 

John E. Varnum, Jr. 

Civil Defense, Radio Officer 

Thomas DeWitt 

Civil Defense, Radio Operators 

Michael Cellucci Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. David M. Sexton 

Edwin Markowski, Jr. 

Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 

Shelter Manager Trainees 

Constance E. Waitc 
Carl E. Sandberg, deceased 

12 



First Aid Trainee 

Starlene Slotnick 

Radiological Officer 

Edward R. Wiot 

Radiological Monitor 

Stephen Sandberg 

Auxiliary Police, Civil Defense, Squad One 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Captain 
James O. Aronson, Lieutenant Mario Pederzini, Sergeant 

Vinhent M. Celluchi, Master Sergeant Warren Robinson, Sergeant 
Robert Sessa, Sergeant 

Officers 

Thomas J. Barry James T. Kashalena 

Lawrenre A. Burns Robert D. Taylor 

William Hancock, Jr. John E. Varnum, Sr. 

Constance E. Waite 

Auxiliary Police, Civil Defense, Squad Two 

John T. Rogers, Lieutenant 

Officers 

Leroy Carter Mark S. Douglas 

Robert P. Connolly Alfred G. Laime 

John R. Costello William V. Marchand 

Michael F. Costello Edward A. Taraskkiewicz 

Mario F. DiCenzo William E. Thayer 

Conservation Commission 

Peter V. D. Schroder Term expires 1973 

Mario Pederzini Term expires 1973 

Joseph Donnelly Term expires 1974 

Robert Kinsman Term expires 1974 

Ellen E. Gifford Term expires 1975 

13 



Richard M. Heiligmani) Term expires 1975 

Prof. Robert Hilton 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

Richard G. Connors, resigned Term expires July 12, 1973 

Robert S. Capers, Jr. Term expires July 12, 1974 

Medfield Designee Advisory Board, MBTA 

Frederick C. Conley 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Harry A. Kelleher Term expires August 3, 1974 

Town Garage Committee 

John A. Auld Charles E. Gifford 

Austin C. Buchanan Nicholas Laverghetta 

Valdimar J. Salava 

Town Garage Committee, Ex-Officio Members 

Ellis N. Allen William E. McCarthy Joseph A. Roberts, Jr. 

Building Code Committee 

Herbert B. Burr 

Joseph E. Ryan 

James W. Brock, Associate Member Term expires 1973 

Nicholas Laverghetta Term expires 1973 

Joseph T. Cunning Term expires 1974 

Francis J. Mastropieri Term expires 1975 

Council on Aging 

Orrin E. Wilkins (deceased) Term expires November 16, 1973 

Charles A. Doyle Term expires November 16, 1973 

Ralph Good Term expires November 16, 1973 

Madeleine I. Harding Term expires November 16, 1973 

Charles Bourke Term expires November 16, 1974 

William Cleary Term expires November 16, 1974 

Adus Hjelmstad, resigned Term expires November 16, 1974 

14 



Gerald W. Bangs 
Virginia Coupe r 
David Flanders 



Term expires November 16, 1975 
Term expires November 16, 1975 
Term expires November 16, 1975 



Representatives to Southwest Area 
Selectmen's Coordinating Committee 

Sub-Committee on Regional Soiid Waste Disposal 

Robert Ceresi 

Data Processing Study Committee 



James Brennan 
William F. Hancock, Jr. 



R. Wade Williams 

Frederick C. Conley, Ex-officio 



Collective Bargaining Team 

Harry A. Kelleher Andrew R. Sifflard Charles Peck 

Pleasant Street Apartment Study Committee 



Gerard F. Gallagher 
William H. Mann 
Joseph L. Marcionette 
William E. McCarthy 



Melville J. Mills 

Joseph E. Ryan 

Robert A. Vanslette 

Harry R. Leighton, deceased 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY PLANNING BOARD 



Elizabeth M. Place 
Richard V. Sturtevant 
Paul A. Hurd 
James E. Loer 
Jeanne Schutte 
Richard Kaerwer 
Joseph C. Donnelly, Jr. 
Grace Ritchie 
Stanley Rossier 



Term expires June 28, 


1973 


Term expires June 28, 


1973 


Term expires June 28, 


1973 


Term expires June 28, 


1973 


Term expires June 28, 


1973 


Term expires June 28, 


1974 


Term expires June 28, 


1974 


Term expires June 28, 


1974 


Term expires June 28, 


1975 



1J5 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY BOARD OF HEALTH 



Inspector of Sanitation 



Ferial R. Morrissette 



Board of Health — Advisory Committee 



Dr. A. Ritchoy Stagg 
.Madeleine I. Harding 
Ferial R. Morrissette, 
Registered Sanitarian 



Mrs. Porter Whitney, VNA 
Marie M. Burke 
Nancv J. Preston 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



Warrant Committee 



Kenneth J. Patrick 
Charles H. Peck 
Robert F. Sylvia 
Kenneth S. Brock 
Robert W. MacLeod 
Richard J. Lyman 
Robert C. Coleman 
David E. Hansen 
Jane P. McCarty 



Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 
Term 



expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 
expires 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1, 1973 
1, 1973 
1, 1973 
1, 1974 
1, 1974 
1, 1974 
1, 1975 
1, 1975 
1. 1975 



School Planning & Building Committee 



Ralph Parmagiane 
Philip J. Burr 
Robert S. Capers, Jr. 



Term expires April 1, 1973 
Term expires April 1, 1973 
Term expires April 1, 1974 



Personnel Board 



William S. McVicar 
Neal R. Olsen 
Andrew R. Sifflard 
Eugene Sullivan 



Term expires November 30, 1972 
Term expires November 30, 1973 
Term expires November 30, 1974 
Term expires November 30, 1975 



16 



Memorial Day Committee 

Edward W. Callow George E. Hinkley 

Albert Cruickshank Joseph L. Marcionette 

Warren Sheard 

Regional Vocational School Study 

Philip J. Burr Thomas A. Procop Perry A. Constas 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TREASURER 

Marie M. Burke, Assistant Treasurer 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TAX COLLECTOR 
Deputy Collectors 

Peter Bartkewicz Virginia Kinter Clarissa C. Supko 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY FIRE CHIEF 

Walter Reynolds, Jr., Deputy Fire Chief 
Frederick A. Rogers, Captain 
Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 
Ellis N. Allen, Lieutenant 
William B. Reynolds, Lieutenant 
Mario Pederzini, Clerk 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN CLERK 

Marie M. Burke, Ass't. Town Clerk 

Assistant Clerks 

Kathleen N. Conners Charlotte R. Randolph 

Pauline M. Goucher Gwendolen K. Suereth 

17 



DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 1972 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



TRANSITION. 

On March 7, 1972, the Board of Selectmen reorganized with Harry 
A. Kelleher as Chairman, Weston G. Kolsti as Clerk, and Joseph L. 
Marcionette as third member. 

On March 6, 1972, the Town of Medfield adopted its first Home Rule 
Charter. This was an historic act of the Town in that the Charter provided 
the Town with a more modern governmental structure and greater ability 
to act autonomously in adjusting to future needed changes. The Board of 
Selectmen expressed to the members of the Charter Commission the 
gratitude of the Town for the outstanding work of the Commission in 
preparing the Town's new Charter. 

On March 7, 1972, the Board of Selectmen, acting in accordance with 
the provisions of the new Charter, appointed members of the Board of 
Health, Cemetery Commission, Water and Sew T erage Board and Tree 
Warden. 

On May 2, 1972 the members of the Board of Selectmen met with 
four members of the Park & Recreation Commission and voted to elect 
Andrew F. Thompson to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Robert Morrison, term to expire March 1973. 

On May 16, 1972, the Board of Selectmen appointed Mr. Paul Curran 
to the combined positions of Veterans' Agent and Director of Veterans' 
Services. Mr. Curran succeeded Mr. Philip J. Burr who resigned from 
his veterans posts after being elected to the School Committee. The 
Board of Selectmen thanked and congratulated Mr. Burr for his many 
years of service to the veterans of Medfield. 

On July 1, 1972, Mr. J. Roger Petrie, the first Plumbing Inspector 
of the Town, resigned from that office. The Board expressed the gratitude 
and commendation of the Town for Mr. Petrie's twenty years of outstand- 
ing service as Plumbing Inspector. 

On November 21, 1972, the Board of Selectmen voted to appoint Ken- 
neth W. Macek to the Water and Sewerage Board to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Harry R. Leighton. Acting under the provisions of 
Section 3-3 of the Town Charter, the Selectmen voted unanimously to 
create two new positions of Associate Members to the Board to provide 
them with added technical advice, financial analysis, and administrative 
support which the new sewer project will require. Allan F. Holmes and 
Arthur L. Farrar were appointed for terms expiring in March 1974. 



21 



TRIBUTE PAID. 

At their meeting on April 18, 1972, the Selectmen noted with sadness 
the passing of Warren Lovelace who was deeply respected by all Town 
officials and by those with whom he worked. Mr. Lovelace served on the 
Finance Committee from 1963 to 1971. 

On May 16, 1972, the Selectmen accepted with regret the resignation 
of John F. McCarthy from the Police Department. He had performed his 
duties in a commendable fashion since 1946. 

WILLIAM E. MCCARTHY, superintendent of streets, re- 
ceives AWARD AS OUTSTANDING MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE. 




L. to R. Highway foreman Robert Kennedy, Selectman Kelleher, Super- 
intendent McCarthy, Selectman Marcionette, Executive Secretary Frederick 
C. Conley. 

Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

On June 6, 1972, the Selectmen announced with pleasure that William 
E. McCarthy, Superintendent of Streets, was honored by the Massachu- 
setts League of Cities and Towns. He was selected as the Outstanding 
Municipal Employee for 1971 in Towns under 12,000 population and was 
presented with a plaque at the League's Annual Meeting. The Select- 



22 



men submitted Mr. McCarthy's name as a candidate for this award be- 
cause they have been continually impressed with the high level of his 
service to the Town and because they felt that his service could well be 
pointed out as an outstanding example of excellence in public service. 

RETIRING SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, THOMAS A. BLAKE 
AND HIS WIFE, RITA AT TESTIMONIAL. 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

The Selectmen voted unanimously to proclaim June 11-June 17, 1972 
as Thomas A. Blake Week in Medfield, honoring "Tom" upon his retire- 
ment as Superintendent of Schools. He has been a dedicated educator 
and administrator, admired by all who are privileged to know him. 



23 



Oil August 10, 1972, the Town officials and employees were deeply 
grieved by the loss of Harry R. Leighton, who served his Town well for 
many years as Superintendent of the Water and Sewerage Department 
and was a dedicated member of the Board since 1948. 

On December 16, 1972, the Board of Selectmen extended their con- 
gratulations to Mrs. Marie Burke on being selected by the Medfield Lions 
Club as "Citizen of the Year." Marie has earned the admiration of the 
townspeople over the forty-four years she has served the Town as Admin- 
istrative Secretary and well deserved the honor accorded her. 



INNOVATIONS: 

Medfield, like most other towns in the United States, continues to 
feel the impact of the fiscal crisis ; wage and price stabilization, variables 
of the Vietnam War and the ecological revolution. Locally, school and 
school housing continues as an ever present problem which must be faced 
by the Town. The stabilization of the tax rate which was achieved in 1972 
becomes a greater challenge as the Town embarks upon an 18-month 
transitional fiscal period which will result in a conformity of the fiscal 
periods of cities and towns, State government and the Federal govern- 
ment by July 1, 1974. 

On November 17, 1972, the Board of Selectmen signed grants with 
the Division of Water Pollution Control of the Department of Natural 
Resources of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the amount of 
$1,025,000.00 and with the Environmental Protection Agency of the 
Federal Government in the amount of $2,050,000.00 for the construction 
of the sewer plant and interceptor sewer lines for the Town of Medfield. 
These grants result in a reduction in the Medfield share of the sewer 
project from $1,897,000.00, which was estimated at the Town Meeting in 
November 1970, to $1,529,000.00. The Board of Selectmen is continuing to 
pursue other grants with the hope of even further reducing Medfield's 
share in the cost of this project. The design of the Town's new sewer sys- 
tem is now complete, and it is anticipated that the project will be put out 
to bid early in 1973. 

During 1972, the Board of Selectmen continued their pursuit of re- 
gional approaches to services of the Town. Twelve towns joined with 
Medfield in a collective purchase of road salt. This first venture in col- 
lective purchasing resulted in a decrease of more than $5.00 per ton in 
the cost of salt from the 1971 price. The overall savings to the Town was 
$4,000.00. The estimated savings to the group of Towns which joined in 
the bid was $90,000.00. The Town also joined with the towns of Walpole 
and Westwood in purchasing police cruisers. This endeavor also resulted 
in reduced costs to the Town. After these first successful experiments 
with collective purchasing, the Board plans to greatly expand collective 



24 



purchasing in the coming year, including such things as gasoline and 
equipment purchases. 

GRANT IS FILED FOR FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDS FOR CON- 
STRUCTION OF SEWER PLANT AND INTERCEPTOR SEWER 
LINES FOR TOWN OF MEDFIELD. 




L. to R. Selectman Marcionette, Ellen Gilford, Conservation Commissioner, 
C. Willis, Selectman Kelleher, Town Counsel Charles Fuller, Jr., Select- 
man Kolsti, Water and Sewer Commissioner John D. Williams. 

Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

Another area in which the Board has been pursuing long range 
regional solutions is that of solid waste disposal. At the Special Town 
Meeting on December 11th, at the request of the Board of Selectmen, 
the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 44A of the General Laws were adop- 
ted by the Town, establishing a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Com- 
mittee. This was the first formal step towards a regionalized solution to 
solid waste disposal. 

In another area of solid waste disposal, the Board expanded its recycl- 
ing activities at the Town's Sanitary Landfill. The landfill now provides 
facilities for collection of newspapers and cans for recycling purposes. It 
is hoped that the recycling program will be further expanded in 1973 to 
include glass bottles. 



25 



In 1972, the Board of Selectmen sought and received from the 
Department of Public Works posted speed regulations for route 109 and 
27 in Medfield. Signs posting these speed limits are now being installed. 
These new regulations established safe speeds for the traveller and pro- 
vides for stricter enforcement by our Police Department. 

In accordance with Article 33 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1972, 
the Board of Selectmen appointed five members of the Data Processing 
Study Committee. This committee has met continuously throughout 1972, 
examining the various financial and recordkeeping operations of the Town 
to see where the application of data processing could result in greater ef- 
ficiency and economies in the operations of the Town. It is the intention of 
the Board to have this committee continue its work in order that thr 
Town might have the sound guidelines which the members of this com- 
mittee can provide. 

During this past year, the Town participated in the Federally aided 
Neighborhood Youth Corps Program for the first time. This program 
provided employment for twelve young people of Medfield and enabled 
the Town to accomplish many tasks for which there were not funds in 
the 1972 budgets. This first participation in this program was most suc- 
cessful, both in the quality of workers and in the quantity of work ac- 
complished. It is the hope of the Board that Medfield will be able to 
continue to participate in this most successful program. 

At the Special Town Meeting on December 11, 1972, the Town voted 
to adopt the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8D of the General Laws 
which provided for the establishment of an Historical Commission. This 
Commission will enable the Town to include its historical sites in the 
State inventory of historical landmarks to be completed by June 1973. 
It is also anticipated that the Historical Commission will be of great 
assistance in preparing for the Town's 325th Anniversary in 1976. 

The construction of the relocated Route 27, which the Board of 
Selectmen has been pursuing since 1967, began in the latter part of 
1972 and will be completed before June of 1974. It is the hope of the 
Board that this project which is being carried on entirely with Federal 
and State funds, will stimulate development of Medfield's industrial area 
and thus broaden Medfield's tax base. 

The Medfield Town Garage which was approved at the 1972 Annual 
Town Meeting will be completed soon, providing for a more efficient 
operation of the public works departments of the Town and greatly in- 
creased parking area in the center of Town. 

During 1972, the Town participated in the Federal Emergency Em- 
ployment Act of 1971 by having a clerical employee in the Police Depart- 
ment and a Town Engineer, working for all departments of the Town, 

26 



whose salaries were paid by the Federal Government. Neither of these 
employees are any longer employed by the Town and the hiring freeze 
which exists under this Act results in a temporary suspension of Med- 
field's participation in this program. 

In consultation with the Planning Board., it was decided that an appeal 
should be filed from the decision of the Norfolk Superior Court which 
had interpreted the requirements of the zoning by-law adopted at the 
Annual Town Meeting in March as not being applicable to older subdiv- 
isions and roads. This is one illustration of the greater incidence of the 
Town being involved in litigation. 

SELECTMEN RECEIVE $18,000 CHECK FROM DEPARTMENT OF 
NATURAL RESOURCES, REIMBURSING TOWN FOR ACQUISI- 
TION OF FORMER ATLANTIC BRICK PROPERTY FOR CONSER- 
VATION PURPOSES. 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

1. to r. Selectman Marcionette, Ellen Gifford, Conservation Com- 
missioner, Selectman Keileher and Selectman Kolsti. 

LEGISLATION: 

During 1972, Federal Revenue Sharing, which the Board of Select- 
men had supported for two years, was enacted into law. This program 



27 



will provide the Town of Medfield with a share of the Federal revenue in 
each year from 1972 through 1976. Medfield's 1972 allotment has been 
determined to be $94,400.00. This amount will increase in each of the 
succeeding four years. The major advantage of this program over pre- 
vious Federal programs is that the funds will be used for the purposes 
determined by the local government to be urgent and not for the purposes 
determined by the Federal Government. 

A bill came before the Legislature in 1972 to make compulsory arbi- 
tration binding upon cities and towns. In accordance with the resolution 
adopted at the Special Town Meeting of May 15, 1972, the Selectmen suc- 
cessfully joined with the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association and the 
Massachusetts League of Cities and Towns in opposing compulsory arbi- 
tration in municipal collective bargaining. Such legislation would have 
resulted in the possibility that Medfield's tax rate would be determined 
in part by an appointed labor arbitrator. 

In accordance with Article 12 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1972, 
at the request of the Board of Selectmen, Senator David Locke and 
Representative Charles W. Long co-sponsored a bill to the Legislature 
which provided for the removal of the Medfield Chief of Police from the 
provisions of the Massachusetts Civil Service Law. The Legislature en- 
acted Chapter 557 of the Acts of 1972 which provided for removal of the 
position of the Medfield Chief of Police from the Massachusetts Civil 
Service Law, exempting the present Chief, on the condition that the fol- 
lowing question be answered affirmatively by a majority of voters at the 
next annual Town election. The following question will appear on the 
ballot at the 1973 election: 

"Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year nineteen 
hundred and seventy-two, entitled 'An Act removing the office of 
chief of police, of the town of Medfield from the civil service 
law and rules, be accepted?" 

Through the efforts of the Board of Assessors, the State Tax Commis- 
sion was forced to increase the value of the land controlled by the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, commonly known as the Medfield State 
Hospital, from $252,435.00 to $1,559,000.00. This should represent an 
amount on the Cherry Sheet in the coming years of $117,190.00 to the 
Town of Medfield. The amount formerly was $7,800.00. The Board of 
Assessors is to be congratulated for their efforts which resulted in this 
substantial gain to the Town. 

The Board of Selectmen submitted an article to the Massachusetts 
Selectmen's Association Annual Town Meeting which passed unanimously 
and which authorizes that association to sponsor legislation which would 
require the Commonwealth to pay retroactively to cities and towns monies 
owed by the Commonwealth in 1972 for increase in valuation of State- 



28 



owned land within the boundaries of those cities and towns. This bill 
will be acted on in the 1973 session of the Great and General Court. 

Chapter 615 of the Acts of 1972 authorized the Department of 
Mental Health to transfer to the Town of Medfield approximately 56 
acres of Medfield State Hospital land. The passage of this bill was the 
result of three years of work on the part of the Boards of Selectmen to 
obtain this land from the Medfield State Hospital. 

Chapter 735 of the Acts of 1972 required towns of over 6,000 popu- 
lation to divide into precincts of not more than 4,000 inhabitants. After 
meeting with representatives of the Republican and Democratic Town 
Committees, the Board voted unanimously to recommend to the Special 
Commission on Redisricting to divide the Town into four precincts 
divided by natural boundaries of Main Street, North, South and High 
Streets. This was subsequently approved by the Commission. 

The Board of Selectmen also joined with other cities and towns in 
the MBTA District in an unsuccessful attempt to urge the Commonwealth 
to provide the funds for one-half of the MBTA operating deficit which is 
now assessed against the cities and towns. As pointed out in the Select- 
men's report of 1971, Medfield's share of the MBTA operating deficit rose 
from $702.00 in 1967 to $44,300.00 in 1971. This assessment in 1972 rose 
again to $56,984.00, or $0.89 on the Medfield tax rate. 

The Board of Selectmen deeply appreciates the cooperative spirit 
which prevails within the Town Departments and the Selectmen wish 
to express their continued appreciation to all those who work tirelessly 
for the well-being of the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY A. KELLEHER Chairman 
WESTON G. KOLSTI, Clerk 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 

Board of Selectmen 



29 



HISTORICAL NOTE 
LETTER OF CORRESPONDENCE 

Daring the year 1773, the Town of Medfield received several com- 
munications from the Committee of Correspondence from the Town of 
Boston. On December 14th, the Town voted to appoint a committee of 
six citizens to reply. The reply of Medfield Committee of Correspondence 
is cited, in part, in the Oxford History of the American People by Samuel 
Eliot Morison (1965), page 271. Morison stated, "That tiny community 
had grasped the principle that the rule of law is perhaps the greatest 
achievement in the long struggle for liberty, and that if it is lost, liberty 
is lost; that the use of orderly, 'due process' to change the law is essential 
for an orderly society." 

The Town Meeting records show that the Town voted to send the 
following to the Committee of Correspondence in Boston on December 
29,1773: 

"We esteem the free and full enjoyment of the privileges of English- 
men as the birthright of every American, nor do we know any reason 
why the distance of three thousand miles from the island of Great Brit- 
ain should curtail or abridge them, especially when by charter grant 
they are solemnly ensured to us as though we were born within the 
realm of England. The right to dispose of their OAvn property either 
by their own persons or by their representatives we hold to be the grand 
basis of English Liberty. For these reasons we hold it a fundamental 
principle not tamely to be yielded up to any man or body of men on 
earth, that the rights of taxation in the British colonies in America is 
vested solely in the Houses of Assembly of the respective provinces, who 
are made up of men vested with authority by the free vote and SLifTrage 
of the persons on whom the tax is to be laid. It is with grief we behold 
this fundamental principle, this charter grant, become a matter of dis- 
pute and contention. 

We have been alarmed with the measures for several years past 
adopted and pursued by the British administration under various forms 
evidently repugnant to and subversive of the fundamental principles of 
our happy Constitution, particularly in laying taxes or imposing duties 
upon articles of importation for the sole purpose of raising a revenue 
upon America. We feel with our brethren a fresh alarm upon the 
commission granted the East India Company to export their teas to 
America in such quantities as the lords of trade shall think proper, 
subject to a duty payable here, which carries in it an evident design 
(couched under plausible and subtile pretences) to enforce and establish 
the said revenue act and the unconstitutional measures of the British 
administration. 



30 



We heartily agree with our brethren of the town of Boston in their 
opinion of the baneful and pernicious tendency of this measure, which 
was evidently planned to ease the minds of the India Company and 
prevent their further petitions for the repeal of the act imposing a duty 
on tea, not for the benefit of the colonies, yea, designed the more artfully 
to fasten the chains of slavery upon a burdened and distressed people. 
We highly approve the vigilance, care, and fortitude of our brethren who 
have so bravely exerted themselves in the great cause of liberty, and are 
ready to unite our endeavor with theirs as members of the body politic in 
all constitutional methods to preserve, defend, or recover our just rights. 
We will never be behind our brethren in the most painful, laborious, or 
expensive trouble in so just a cause as the preservation and security of 
the privileges we inherit as the purchase of our fathers' blood and 
treasure. United we stand, divided we fall. 

In the present matter of uneasiness, we are highly satisfied and 
pleased with the spirited, patriotic, and disinterested conduct of some of 
the principal undertakers of teas in the town of Boston and Charlestown, 
and could heartily wish a similar agreement might be formed and inviola- 
bly maintained by all the undertakers of teas throughout the several gov- 
ernments on the continent, and that the consumers as the undertakers of 
this article would unite as one man to refrain the use of it so long as it 
is subject to parliamentary duty. This must be allowed on all hands to 
be a justifiable and at the same time the easiest and safest way of shak- 
ing off the burden of oppression and the chain of slavery. To contribute 
our part of this glorious cause, we do therefore resolve that we will not 
purchase, or use, or suffer to be used in our families, any tea that we 
know to be subject to a duty, at least till such time as the minds of our 
brethren in other towns can be known. 

We have no disposition to complain when we are not burdened, nor 
do we desire to fault the measures of administration when they are not 
evidently repugnant to the rights of mankind and the liberties of Eng- 
lish subjects in particular. We have a firm affection for the illustrious 
house of Hanover and heartily wish that his present Majesty might 
long reign over a free and happy people, and that that dignity of the 
British crown and sceptre may descend in peace and sit easy on the 
heads of his royal descendants for ages and generations yet to come. 
As the highest evidence of this, we must say we cordially acquiesce in 
Revolution principles, and are determined upon these principles to the 
utmost of our power to defend and maintain the invaluable liberties to 
which we are thereby entitled, against all usurpation and encroachment, 
as we suppose every friend to the present royal family must do, if he will 
act in consistence with those principles upon which the happy revolution 
took place. 

While we profess ourselves advocates for rational constitutional lib- 
erty, we do not mean to patronize Libertinism and licentiousness. We 



31 



are sensible of the necessity oi government for the security of life, 

liberty, and property, and mean to vindicate and submit to all lawful 
and constitutional authority. We wish the blessing of law and govern- 
ment, and yet of rational liberty, as extensive as the subjects to enjoy 
them; and therefore cannot but think it incumbent upon us to bear testi- 
mony against that iniquitous practice of enslaving the Africans. It 
appears at first view greatly abusrd for us to plead for liberty and yet 
patronize the most cruel servitude and bondage. The poor Africans, 
when taken from all that is dear to them in their native soil, have not the 
least shadow of liberty remaining. They have nothing that they can 
claim as their own; their time is entirely devoted to the service of their 
absolute lords, their bodies are at their disposal to be bartered and sold 
from man to man as the senseless beasts; their children, if any they 
have, are born in an estate of abject servitude, than which nothing can be 
more repugnant to liberty, for which we so universally contend. We 
wish to maintain constitutional liberty ourselves, and cannot endure the 
thoughts of its being withheld from the same flesh and blood for no 
other reason that we can conceive of but because the God of nature has 
been pleased to tinge their skins with a different color from our own. 
If we look for liberty ourselves, w r e conceive we ought not to continue to 
enslave others, but immediately to set about some effectual method to 
prevent it in the future. Our earnest wish is that the things which 
belong to the nation's peace may in no one instance be hid from our 
eyes. We remain united with our brethren in one common cause. 



Two days after the December 14th Town Meeting, Sam Adam's Sons 
of Liberty, thinly disguised as Mohawk Indians and Negroes, emptied 342 
big chests of precious tea into Boston Harbor. 



32 



VOTING PRECINCTS 

In conformance with Chapter 735 of the Acts of 1972, the Town of 
Medfield has been divided into the following precincts : 

PRECINCT ONE 



Adams Street 
Blacksmith Road 
Bridge Street 
Charlesdale Road 
Colonial Road 
Cottage Street 
Crane Place 
Dale Street 
Evergreen Way 
Farm Street 
Fox Lane 
Frairy Street 
Grove Street 
Harding Street 
Hospital Road 
Kamark Drive 



Longmeadow Road 
Marlyn Road 
Mill Street 
Mitchell Street 
Pheasant Road 
Richard Road 
School Street 
Springvalley Road 
Stoneybrook Road 
Upham Road 
Vinald Road 
West Street 
West Mill Street 
Wight Street 
WoodfaU Road 



PRECINCT TWO 



Brook Street 
Castle Avenue 
Cedar Lane 
Curtis Drive 
Cypress Street 
Emerson Road 
Erik Road 
Flintlocke Lane 
Green Street 
Hartford Street 
Hatter's Hill Road 
Janes Avenue 
Johns Avenue 
Kenney Road 



Lantern Lane 

Lowell Mason Road 

Main Street (464 to Dover Line) 

Maplewood Road 

Meade Avenue 

North Street 

Partridge Road 

Pine Street 

Remsen Avenue 

Scott Road 

Summer Street 

Tamarack Road 

Winter Street 



PRECINCT THREE 



Bayberry Road 
Belknap Road 
Bow Street 
Camelot Lane 
Carmen Circle 



Knollwood Road 
Lake wood Drive 
Lawrence Circle 
Lawrence Court 
Ledgetree Road 



33 



Country Way 

si Circle 
Cross Street 

Kim St root 
Fairview Road 

Fieldstone Drive 
Forest vStrcet 
Foundry Street 
Garry Drive 
Grace Drive 
Granite Street 
Gun Hill Road 
Hale Place 
Haven Road 
Hearthstone Drive 
Henderson Way 
High Street 
Hillcrest Road 
Hilltop Circle 
Homestead Drive 



Lee Road 
Linden Court 
.Mill brook Road 
Nebo Street 
Old Mount Nebo 
Oxbow Road 
Philip Street 
Plain Street 
Pound Street 
Ridge Street 
Robert Sproul Road 
Rocky Lane 
Rolling Lane 
Rustic Lane 
Sawmill Lane 
Snyder Road 
Stagecoach Road 
Steven Lane 
Westview Road 
Wildewood Drive 



PRECINCT FOUR 



Alder Road 

Allen Road 

Arnold Drive 

Bartlett Avenue 

Black Pine Road 

Boiling Spring Avenue 

Causeway Lane 

Causeway Street 

Clark Road 

Claypit Road 

Curve Street 

Indian Hill Road 

Juniper Lane 

Kingsbury Drive 

Laurel Drive 

Main Street (481 to Millis Line) 



Miller Street 
Mohawk Street 
Nauset Avenue 
Noon Hill Road 
Oak Street 
Orchard Street 
Park Street 
Penobscot Road 
Pine Grove Road 
Pleasant Court 
Pleasant Street 
Rhododendron Avenue 
Riverview Street 
Robinson Road 
South Street 
Spring Street 



34 



THE MEDFIELD TOWN CHARTER 

Adopted at Town Election, March 6, 1972 

ARTICLE 1. Incorporation, powers. 

Section 1-1. Incorporation. 

The inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, within the territorial limits 
as now or hereafter may be established in the manner provided by law, 
shall continue to be a body corporate and politic with perpetual succes- 
sion under the name "Town of Medfield". 

Section 1-2. Powers. 

The form of government provided by this home rule charter shall be 
known as the Medfield selectmen-open town meeting plan. Pursuant to 
the provisions of this charter and subject only to such limitations as may 
be imposed by the Constitution and statutes of the Commonwealth, the 
town shall have all powers possible for a town to have under the Constitu- 
tion and statutes of the Commonwealth as fully and completely as 
though they were specifically enumerated in this charter. 

Section 1-3. Construction. 

The powers of the town under this charter shall be construed liberally 
in favor of the town, and the specific mention of particular powers in the 
charter shall not be construed as limiting in any way the general power 
stated in this article. 

Section 1-4. Intergovernmental Relations. 

Subject to the applicable requirements of any provision of the Consti- 
tution or statutes of the Commonwealth, the Town of Medfield may exer- 
cise any of its powers or perform any of its functions and may participate 
in the financing thereof, jointly or in cooperation, by contract or other- 
wise, with any one or more states or civil divisions or agencies thereof, or 
the United States or any agency thereof. 

Section 1-5. Town Seal. 

The town seal in existence at the time this charter is adopted, unless 
the town meeting shall vote to adopt another, shall continue to be the 
town seal and shall be kept in the custody of the town clerk. Papers or 
documents issued from any office or board of the town may be attested to 
by the use of the said seal. 

ARTICLE 2. Legislative branch-open town meeting. 
Section 2-1. Legislative Authority. 

Legislative authority of the town shall be vested in the town meeting 
open to all registered voters. 

35 



Section 2-2, Time of Annual Town Meeting. 

The annual town meeting shall be held on the last Monday in April. 
Section l 1 -:}. Special Town Meetings. 

Special town meetings may be called at the discretion of the board of 
selectmen, by a petition signed by two-hundred registered voters of the 
town, or as may otherwise be provided in the General Laws. 

Section 2-4. Moderator and Deputy Moderator, Election, Appointive 
Powers, Terms, Compensation. 

The moderator shall be elected at the regular annual election for a term 
of one year and he shall preside over the annual and special town meet- 
ings. Within twenty days following his election the moderator shall appoint 
a deputy moderator to serve as moderator in the event the moderator is 
absent from any town meeting. The moderator shall also make appoint- 
ments as required of him by by-law or action of town meeting. The 
deputy moderator shall in no event exercise any of the appointive powers 
granted to the moderator. The term of deputy moderator shall end at the 
same time as that of the moderator. The moderator and deputy moderator 
shall receive no compensation for their services. 

Section 2-5. Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting. 

The board of selectmen shall prepare the warrant for the annual 
town meeting and shall each year establish the date at which it is closed 
for the submission of articles. However, in no event shall the warrant for 
each annual town meeting remain open for submission of articles beyond 
March 15. 

Section 2-6. Notice of Town Meetings. 

Notice of all town meetings shall be established by posting a copy of 
the warrant in not less than five public places in the town. This shall be 
accomplished at least seven days before each town meeting. 

Section 2-7. Quorum for Town Meeting. 

The number of registered voters necessary to constitute a quorum shall 
be established from time to time as a by-law voted by town meeting. The 
town meeting may be adjourned by a number of registered voters less 
than a quorum. 

Section 2-8. Warrant Reports. 

A warrant report for the annual town meeting shall be assembled 
and printed by the board of selectmen and placed in distribution to the 

36 



households of the town not less than two weeks prior to the town meet- 
ing. The warrant report shall contain for each article an explanation of 
the article by its petitioner, and a recommendation by the warrant com- 
mittee. The recommendation of the warrant committee shall be based on 
financial and non-financial considerations. If three or more committee 
members vote against a recommendation a minority report shall be ap- 
pended to the recommendation. If fewer than three members of the 
warrant committee vote against a recommendation of the full committee 
a minority report may be appended upon request of the dissenting mem- 
bers. The board of selectmen shall prepare a brief overview of the gen- 
eral government budget article commenting upon significant trends and 
departures from the budget of previous years and containing such re- 
marks as they deem appropriate. 

A warrant report shall be prepared in a like manner by the board of 
selectmen for each special town meeting and may be placed in distribution 
to the households of the town at any time before the special town meeting. 
However, if in the judgment of the selectmen the printing and distri- 
bution of a warrant report would unduly delay the special town meeting 
and cause injury to the town, the selectmen may in place of a printed 
warrant report request the petitioner for each article, and the warrant 
committee, to report only verbally on each article on the floor of the 
town meeting. 

Section 2-9. The Warrant Committee. 

A warrant committee of nine members shall be appointed by the 
moderator. It shall recommend the annual town budget for vote by the 
town meeting and fulfill all duties of a finance committtee as required 
by general law. It shall hold a public hearing not less than thirty days 
prior to the annual town meeting to inform the residents of the town of its 
proposed recommendations and to hear testimony and argument before 
publication of its final recommendations. This hearing shall be attended 
by all elected and appointed town officers, unless they are deterred by 
illness or other reasonable cause, except that chairmen of boards, com- 
missions and committees may represent the remaining members. 

Section 2-10. Attendance of town officials at town meetings. 

All elected and appointed town officers shall attend town meetings 
unless deterred by illness or other reasonable cause. If a town official 
cannot attend a meeting he may send a representative. Chairmen of 
boards, committees and commissions may represent the remainder of 
the members. 



37 



Section 2-11. Initiative. 

Any ten voters of the town may secure, by written petition to the 
board of selectmen, the inclusion of an article for the warrant of any duly 
scheduled annual town meeting, and at least one hundred registered 
voters may secure the same for any special town meeting. Articles may 
also be included for the warrant of annual and special town meetings as 
may otherwise be provided in the General Laws. 

Section 2-12. Condition for Reconsideration of a Vote of Town Meeting. 

No vote of the meeting shall be reconsidered after ten hours have 
elapsed from the time such vote was taken, except by a two-thirds vote. 
When a motion for reconsideration is decided, that decision shall not be 
reconsidered, and no question shall be reconsidered more than once. 

ARTICLE 3. The Board of Selectmen. 

Section 3-1. Size, Term, Election, Vacancies. 

A three member board of selectmen shall be the highest executive 
authority of the town. Selectmen shall serve for three year terms and 
shall be elected at the regular town elections. If a vacancy occurs at any 
time on the board of selectmen it shall be rilled at a special election, 
unless the vacancy occurs ninety days or less before the regular town 
elections, in which case it shall be filled at the regular election. 

Section 3-2. Powers and Duties. 

The board of selectmen shall have all powers it is possible for select- 
men to hold under the General Laws, including the enactment of rules 
and regulations to establish and implement town policies unless such 
powers are specifically assigned to some other office or agency by this 
charter or by a by-law that is not in conflict with this charter. The board 
of selectmen shall have the power to investigate town departments as 
provided in Section 23B, Chapter 41 of the General Laws. 

Section 3-3. Appointments. 

The board of selectmen shall appoint the executive secretary; the 
town counsel; the town accountant; the veterans' agent; the fire chief; the 
police chief; such inspectors as it judges necessary to preserve the health, 
safety, and welfare of the town's citizens; the superintendent of streets; 
the constables; the tree warden; the director of civil defense; and mem- 
bers of the water and sewer commission; the cemetery commission; the 
board of health; registrars of voters; the 'board of appeals for zoning, 
subdivision control and building by-laws; and the development and indus- 
trial commission. The board of selectmen may create such additional 

.'58 



other offices and boards as may be required for the proper administration, 
health, or safety of the town and may terminate the same at its discre- 
tion. Terms of office for all positions and the number of places on boards 
and commissions shall be determined by the board of selectmen, but in 
no event shall any appointment exceed a three year term. Individuals who 
are appointed to offices and boards may be reappointed by the selectmen 
as their terms expire. All offices and agencies granted powers by the 
Constitution and the General Laws shall retain and exercise those 
powers. The selectmen may consolidate departments of town government 
under their jurisdiction, and boards, commissions, committees, and offices 
whose members they appoint. 

Section 3-4. Fiscal Procedures. 

The selectmen shall prepare the annual budget for all offices and de- 
partments for which they are responsible. They shall assemble a budget, 
consisting of requests for expenditures and supporting material for all 
offices, departments, boards, commissions, and committees in the execu- 
tive branch of town government as set forth in this article. They shall 
deliver this 'budget to the warrant committee for its review and recom- 
mendation no later than ninety days before the date of the annual town 
meeting. The warrant committee shall act for the town meeting for this 
purpose. The selectmen shall also prepare a capital and operations expen- 
diture plan containing a list of projects, project costs, and yearly expen- 
ditures for five years in the future. Fiscal responsibilities of the selectmen 
shall be exercised by the executive secretary as set forth in Article 4 of 
this charter. 

ARTICLE 4. The Executive Secretary. 

Section 4-1. Duties and Responsibilities. 

Administration of policies and duties of the board of selectmen as 
specified by this charter, town <by-laws, or the General Laws shall be 
carried out by the executive secretary. The executive secretary shall be a 
person selected for his executive and administrative qualifications, charac- 
ter, training, education, and experience to perform the duties specified in 
this charter and he shall serve at the pleasure of the selectmen. The 
executive secretary shall: 

a. Attend meetings of the board of selectmen and provide the select- 
men with information they require to form policies and make 
decisions relating to the operation of town government functions 
for which they are responsible. 

b. Assist the selectmen with their budgetary responsibilities by as- 
sembling the budget requests of all departments into a unified 
document, by informing the selectmen of unusual budgetary mat- 

39 



tors that require their attention, by preparing for the approval 
of the selectmen a long range town fiscal plan that sets forth 
anticipated operating and capital expenditures, and by perform- 
ing at the request of the selectmen special studies and analyses 
of the costs and benefits of town programs. 

C. Keep the selectmen informed on practices and trends in other 
municipalities, and of hearings and laws of the Commonwealth 
and Federal government. 

d. Provide the selectmen with information on anticipated problems. 

e. Exercise supervisory responsibilities of the selectmen as dele- 
gated by them. 

f. Maintain an inventory of all town-owned property. 

g. Establish and maintain a purchasing service for the town. 

h. Recommend to the selectmen measures to improve town govern- 
ment services. 

i. Make studies and investigations for the board of selectmen at its 
request or at his own initiative concerning matters pertinent to 
the town government. 

j. Perform other duties at the selectmen's request. 

Section 4-2. Restriction on Former Selectmen Taking Position of 
Executive Secretary. 

No person who has served as a selectman of the town may become the 
executive secretary on any basis — temporary, acting, or permanent — 
until two years after he has vacated his office as a selectmen. 

ARTICLE 5. The School Committee. 

Section 5-1. Size, Terms of Office. 

A five member school committee shall be elected at regular town elec- 
tions and each member shall serve for a term of three years. Members 
of the school committee shall be elected as terms expire. 
Section 5-2. Powers and Duties. 

The school committee shall have all the powers and duties school 
committees may have under the Constitution and General Laws of 
the Commonwealth. The school committee shall submit the school de- 

40 



partment budget to the board of selectmen on or before the thirty-first 
day of December for inclusion in the annual town government budget. 

ARTICLE 6. Other Elective Offices. 

The following offices shall be filled by persons elected at the regular 
town elections or at special elections as set forth in this charter and shall 
be for the terms specified. 

a. The town clerk for a term of three years. 

b. The treasurer for a term of three years. 

c. Three members of a board of assessors for three year terms. 
Members shall be elected at the regular town elections as terms 
expire. 

d. Six trustees of the public library for three year terms. Members 
shall be elected at the regular town elections as terms expire. 

e. The collector of taxes for a term of three years. 

f. Seven park and recreation commissioners for three year terms. 
Members shall be elected at the regular town elections as terms 
expire. 

g. Four members of the housing authority for five year terms. 
One member shall be appointed as provided in Chapter 751 of 
the Acts of 1969. Elected members shall be elected at the regular 
town elections and shall take office for five years as terms 
expire. 

h. Five members of the planning board for terms of five years. 
Members shall be elected at the regular town elections as terms 
expire. 

All offices and boards provided for in this section shall have the pow- 
ers and duties provided in the Constitution and General Laws and by-laws 
of the town and shall have the power to create temporary committees to 
assist them in the conduct of their duties as they deem it necessary. 

ARTICLE 7. Elections. 

Section 7-1. Time of Elections. 

Regular town elections for the elective offices specified in this charter 
and for other elective offices as required by the Genral Laws shall be held 
the last Monday in March. 



41 



Section . --. Nomination I 'alters, Time Of Filing. 

All candidates for elected town oflices shall file nomination papers 
with the town clerk twenty-eight days prior to the date of the election. The 
number of signatures on nomination papers shall be one percent of 
the votes cast in the town for governor in the last Commonwealth election 
and as otherwise indicated in Chapter 53 of the General Laws. 

Section 7-3. Position on Ballot for Town Offices, Election. 

Prior to printing of the ballot the town clerk shall request all candi- 
dates for each elected office to draw a number which shall represent his 
position in the list of all candidates for the office. The canddiate may have 
a representative designated by him draw for his position. If neither the 
candidate nor his designated representative draws for his position the 
town clerk shall draw for him. There shall be no designation on the ballot 
with the candidate's name except that the words "candidate for re- 
election," shall appear with the name of the incumbent of an office. The 
candidate or candidates receiving the greatest number of votes cast for 
an office shall be deemed elected. 

Section 7-4. Restriction on Election. 

No person may be a candidate for more than one town government 
office at each election. 

Section 7-5. Date New Officials Take Office. 

Elected town officials shall take office upon election and upon taking 
the oath of office. 

ARTICLE 8. Recall of Elective Officers. 

Section 8-1. Holders of an Office May be Recalled. 

t 

m 

Any holder of an elective office may be recalled, and removed there- 
from by the qualified voters of the town as herein provided. 

Section 8-2. Recall; Petition, Preparation, Filing. 

Any qualified voter of the town may file with the town clerk an affida- 
vit containing the name of the officer sought to be recalled and a state- 
ment of the ground of recall. The town clerk shall thereupon deliver to 
the voter making such affidavit a sufficient number of copies of petition 
blanks demanding such recall, printed forms of which he shall keep on 
hand. The blanks shall be issued by the town clerk with his signature and 
official seal attached thereto; they shall be dated and addressed to the 



42 



selectmen, shall contain the name of the person to whom issued, the 
number of blanks so issued the name of the person sought to be recalled, 
the grounds of recall as stated in said affidavit, and shall demand the 
election of a successor to such office. A copy of the petition shall be 
entered in a record book to be kept in the office of the town clerk. The 
recall petition shall be returned and filed with the town clerk within 
twenty days after the filing of the affidavit. Said petition before being 
returned and filed shall be signed by twenty percent of registered voters, 
and to every signature shall be added the place of residence of the signer, 
giving the street and number. The recall petition shall be submitted by 
the town clerk, at or before 4:30 o'clock in the afternoon of the day follow- 
ing the day on which it must be filed, to the registrars of voters in the 
town, and the registrars shall forthwith certify thereon the number of 
signatures which are names of voters of the town. 

Section 8-3. Resignation of Officer, Election as to Recall. 

If the petition shall be found and certified by the town clerk to be 
sufficient, he shall submit it with his certificate to the selectmen without 
delay. The selectmen shall forthwith give written notice to said officer of 
the receipt of said certificate and, if the officer sought to be removed does 
not resign within five days, shall order an election to be held on a Tues- 
day fixed by them not less than twenty-five days after the date of the 
town clerk's certificate that a sufficient petition is filed. If any other town 
election is to occur within sixty days after the date of said certificate the 
selectmen may, at their discretion, postpone the holding of the recall 
election to the date of such other election. If a vacancy occurs in said 
office after a recall election has been so ordered, the election shall never- 
theies proceed as this section provides. 

Section 8-4. Officer being Recalled May be a Candidate. 

Any officer sought to be recalled may be a candidate to succeed him- 
self, and unless he requests otherwise in writing, the town clerk shall place 
his name on the official ballot without nomination. The nomination of 
other candidates, the publication of the warrant for the recall election, and 
the conduct of the same shall be in accordance with the provisions of law 
relating to elections, unless otherwise provided in this charter. 

Section 8-5. Incumbent to Continue Duties Until Recall. 

The incumbent shall continue to perform the duties of his office until 
the recall election. If then re-elected, he shall continue in office for the 
remainder of his unexpired term, subject to recall as before except as 
provided in section 8-7. If not re-elected in the recall election he shall 
be deemed removed upon the qualification of his successor who shall hold 
office during the unexpired term. If the successor fails to qualify within 



43 



five days after receiving notification of his election the incumbent shall 
thereupon be deemed removed and the office vacant. 

Section 8-6. Form of Ballots for Recall. 

Ballots used in a recall election shall submit the following propositions 
in the order indicated: 

For the recall of (name of oflicer ) . 

Against the recall of (name of oflicer) . 

Under the proposition shall appear the word "Candidates" and the 
direction "Vote for one" and beneath this the names of candidate(s) ; 
the candidate (s) receiving the greatest number of votes shall be deemed 
elected. 

Section 8-7. Limitations on Petitions. 

No recall petition shall be filed against an officer within three months 
after he takes office, nor, in the case of an officer subjected to a recall 
election and not removed thereby, until at least three months after that 
election. 

Section 8-8. Prohibition Against Appointment of Recalled Officer. 

No person who has been recalled from an office or who has resigned 
from office while recall proceedings were pending against him shall be 
appointed to any town office within two years after such removal toy recall 
or resignation. 

ARTICLE 9. General Provisions Relating to Town Officers. 

Section 9-1. Resignation of Town Officers. 

Any person holding an appointive or elective office may resign his 
office by filing a resignation with the town clerk, and such resignation 
shall be effective immediately, unless a time certain is specified therein 
when it shall take effect. 

Section 9-2. Removal of Appointed Town Officers and Members of 
Boards and Commissions. 

An appointee may be removed from office before his term expires by 
the appointing authority. When an appointee is so removed the reason 
for such removal shall be set forth in detail and communicated to him 
in writing. This section shall not apply to town employees whose working 
status is governed by the civil service laws of the Commonwealth. 

44 



Section 9-3. Salaries and Compensation of Elected Town Officers. 

Elected officers shall be compensated in an amount authorized by 
town meeting and provided for by a town meeting appropriation. 

Section 9-4. Salaries and Compensation of Appointed Town Officers. 

Appointed town officers shall receive such compensation for their 
services as the selectmen, or whoever appointed them, shall determine; 
but not exceeding the amounts appropriated for these salaries by the 
town meeting, and not inconsistent with salaries determined by collective 
bargaining contracts, civil service regulations, or the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 10. General Provisions. 

Section 10-1. Definitions. 

Where they appear in this charter the following terms shall be ex- 
plained: selectmen shall mean the board of selectmen; town shall mean 
the town of Medfield. 

Section 10-2. Relation of Charter to Town By-laws, Rules, Regulations, 
Orders, and Special Laws. 

Where provisions of this charter conflict with provisions of town by- 
laws, rules, regulations, orders, and special laws the charter provisions 
shall govern. All provisions of town by-laws, rules, regulations, orders, 
and special laws not superseded by this charter shall remain in force. 

Section 10-3. Severability. 

If any provisions of this charter are held invalid, the other provisions 
of the charter shall not be affected thereby. If the application of the char- 
ter or any of its provisions to any person or circumstance is held invalid, 
the application of this charter and its provisions to other persons and 
circumstances shall not be affected thereby. 

Section 10-4. Specific Provisions Shall Prevail. 

To the extent that any specific provision of this charter shall conflict 
with any provision expressed in general terms, the specific provision shall 
prevail. 

Section 10-5. Publication of Charter and By-laws. 

The board of selectmen shall, within one year of the adoption of this 
charter and thereafter at five year intervals, cause to be prepared a 

45 






recodification of all existing by-laws of the town. Copies of the said by- 
laws and copies of this charter shall be made available in suitable form 
in the office of the town clerk. An amount not to exceed the actual cost 
per copy of reproduction may be charged. 

Section 10-6. Charter Revision. 

Amendments to this charter relating in any way to the composition 
of the town meeting or the composition or mode of election or terms of 
office of the board of selectmen may be proposed only by a charter com- 
mission elected under the General Laws. 

Amendments to the charter relating to other matters may be pro- 
posed by a two-thirds vote at a duly called town meeting in accordance 
with the General Laws. 

Proposed amendments under this charter shall be acted upon by ballot 
of the whole town at a regular or special election of town officers in ac- 
cordance w T ith the General Laws. 

The board of selectmen shall ten years from the effective date of 
this charter form a committee to study the working of town government 
and recommend procedures to revise the charter if that is deemed 
advisable. 

Section 10-7. Continuity of Government. 

The board of selectmen shall have the power to declare a state of 
emergency. If a state of emergency exists and if one selectmen is unable 
to participate in directing remedial activities his duties shall be assumed 
by the treasurer to constitute a three man board. If the treasurer is un- 
available or if more than one selectman is unable to perform his duties, 
responsibility shall be assumed by the chairman of the planning board, 
the moderator or the town clerk in the order listed and as may be re- 
quired. 

ARTICLE 11. Transitional Provisions. 

Section 11-1. Continuation of By-laws. 

All by-laws, resolutions, rules, regulations, and votes of the town 
meeting which are in force at the time this charter is adopted, not incon- 
sistent with the provision of this charter, shall continue in force until 
amended or repealed, including by-laws, if any, which have been passed 
and have been approved by the attorney general but have not yet been 
published. 



Section 11-2. Continuation of Government. 

All departments, boards, commissions, and other town agencies, 
whether elected or appointed, shall continue in the performance of their 
powers, duties, and functions until successors have been elected or ap- 
pointed as provided by this charter, to perform their respective powers, 
duties and functions. 

Section 11-3. Continuation of Administrative Personnel. 

Any person holding an office or position in the administrative service 
of the town at the time this charter takes effect shall retain such office 
or position and continue in the performance of his duties until provision 
shall have been made, in accordance with this charter, for the perfor- 
mance of such duties or the discontinuance of such office or position. 

Section 11-4. Continuance of Contracts and Obligations. 

All contracts or obligations entered into by the town prior to the 
effective date of this charter shall continue in full force and effect. 

Section 11-5. Pending Actions and Proceedings. 

No action or proceedings, whether civil or criminal, pending at the 
time of this charter shall take effect, brought by or against the town or 
any department, board, commission, or other town agency thereof, shall 
be affected or abated by the adoption of this charter or by anything there- 
in contained. 

Section 11-6. Continuance of Tax Obligations. 

All taxes levied or assessed by the town prior to the effective date 
of this charter which have not been collected by the town shall be col- 
lected, with any penalties thereon, by the duly established town govern- 
ment and officers under this charter. 

Section 11-7. Transfer of Records and Property. 

All records, property and equipment whatsoever of any office, depart- 
ment, or agency or part thereof, the powers and duties of which are as- 
signed in whole or in part to another office or agency shall be transferred 
forthwith to the office, department, or agency to which such powers and 
duties are assigned. 

Section 11-8. Park and Recreation Commissioners; Method of Election. 



47 



Hie intent of this charter is to establish a seven member board of 
Park and Recreation Commissioners with three year terms. Three mem- 
bers shall be elected in one year and two members in each of the following 
two years. Once this pattern has been established the provisions of Article 
6-f shall prevail. 

The two additional Park and Recreation Commissioners created by 
this charter shall be elected at the first town elections held under the 
charter for terms to expire in 1975. 

Section 11-9. Effective Date of Charter. 

This charter shall become effective on the date it is approved by the 
registered voters of the town except for the provisions pertaining to the 
dates of town meeting and town elections. Those provisions shall become 
effective on December 31 immediately preceding the July 1 on which 
the town begins its fiscal year as required by the Commonwealth. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 
Gentlemen : 

Submitted herewith is a report of the Street Department for the 
year 1972. 

Hospital Road. In conjunction with the Chapter 90 construction of 
Hospital Road between the Hospital gate and Harding Street, the Water 
Department and the Street Department cooperated in moving hydrants 
and installing new water services from the main to property lines. Upon 
completion of the project, the Tree Department planted various types of 
trees in permanent places. In anticipation of construction, trees were 
planted in permanent places in 1967 which assures the residents of 
shade and beauty. 

Town Garage. The Street Department has worked with the Town 
Garage Committee and performed some of the work which reduces the 
cost of the building. The Water Department, assisted by the Street 
Department, installed the main, hydrant and service lines to the building. 
Other site work such as grading around the building, was performed by 

48 



the Street Department. It is planned to start the permanent access road 
to new Route 27 during the winter of 1973 so that gravel from West Street 
construction can be utilized. 

West Street Chapter 90 Construction. The Town voted in December 
of 1972 to construct West Street from Bridge Street to new Route 27. In 
order to expedite construction to coordinate with the Route 27 construc- 
tion, the sewer installations and to be able to perform regular summer 
maintenance, the Tree Department and the Street Department will cut 
the trees during the winter of 1973 and thereby expedite the moving and 
lowering of utility poles and wires which otherwise would be a time 
consuming process. 

Surfacing- Program. Streets or parts of Streets oiled under the Chap- 
ter 81 surface program were Bridge Street, Pleasant Street, Orchard 
Street, Hartford Street, Green Street, North Street, Summer Street, 
Granite Street, Dale Street, Pine Street, Foundry Street, Curve Street 
and Metacomet Street. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance. Under this program, the State, County and 
Town equally participate in maintaining streets originally constructed 
with Chapter 90 funds. In 1971 and 1972, 3,700 feet of High Street was 
resurfaced with Chapter 90 Maintenance Funds which leaves 5,100 feet 
to surface before the program is completed. 

Ecology. For over ten years, the Street Department has cooperated 
with Mrs. Myron Smith and the Garden Club and their semi-annual 
cleanup drives of roadsides, and to Mrs. Smith and the Garden Club 
the Department is very grateful. The Street Department transports metal 
cans deposited in landfill area to Millis at intervals. 

As a result of concentration by the several Highway Associations on 
the use of salt for snow and ice control, highway officials throughout the 
state are concerned about its effect on water supplies. In the interest of 
economics, Medfield purchased its first hydraulic spreader in 1963; hy- 
draulic spreaders will spread about one half the salt that the older type 
spreader applied. In saving money, there was less runoff of water con- 
taining salt. Newer and cheaper equipment, originally used in Europe, 
will permit a lesser, but more effective application of salt. Throughout 
the snow belt officials in charge of maintenance of public ways realize 
their responsibilities and are searching for new ways as well as improv- 
ing old ways so that water supplies will not be spoiled. 

TJphani Road Culvert. Funds were appropriated in 1972 for the re- 
placement of an ancient and partially collapsed culvert under Upham 
Road. By the time the pipe had arrived and other arrangements were 
completed, the Vine Brook watershed was saturated and holding back 
the water for the three days necessary for installation was doubtful. 

49 



Fortunately, the installation was not attempted because the Fall was one 
of the wettest ever recorded. 

During the past year, the Street Department assisted other depart- 
ments and in turn enjoyed the cooperation and assistance of various Town 

departments. 

Pauline Goucher and Frederick Conley of the Selectmen's Office were 
helpful in many ways that contributed to a successful year of highway 
maintenance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

william e. McCarthy 

Superintendent of Streets 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit the Annual Report of the Medfield Police Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1972. 

Accidents Reported 254 

Personal Injuries 64 

Ambulance Trips 200 

Arrests 79 

Assaults 5 

Accosting 3 

Arson 3 

Attempted Arson 1 
Assistance: 

Other Departments 197 

Motorists 182 

General 260 
Automobiles : 

Removed from Highways 8 



50 



Reported Stolen 


7 


Stolen MV Recovered 


8 


Citations Issued 


340 


Suspensions of Licenses 


37 


Bomb Scares 


13 


Breaking and Enterings 


60 


Attempted Breaking and Enterings 


15 


Burgular Alarms Answered 


236 


Civil Matters and Family Problems 


66 


Closed Homes Checked 


602 


Court Attendance 


285 


Disturbances 


12 


Doors Found Unlocked or Open 


148 


Windows Found Unlocked or Open 


67 


Intoxicated Persons 


6 


Emergency Calls 


166 


Fires Repsonded to by Police 


89 


Fires Put Out by Police 


6 


Funeral Escorts 


21 


Indecent Exposures 


2 


Investigation for Miscellaneous Complaints 


1584 


Investigations with other Departments 


37 


Larceny: 




Under $50.00 


89 


Over $50.00 


48 


Bicycles 


44 


Motor Vehicles 


7 


Attempted Larceny 


6 


Lost Children Reported 


12 


Lost Children Located by Police 


9 


Malicious Destruction to Property 


120 


Missing Patients Reported 


107 


Returned by Police 


49 


Missing Persons Reported 


23 


Located by Police 


6 


Messages Delivered 


97 


Permits Issued : 




Gunsmith 


1 


Ammunition Dealer 


3 


Firearms Identification Cards 


59 


Pistol Permits 


138 


Bicycles Registered 




Property Reported Lost 


69 


Lost Property Turned into Police 


137 


Prowlers 


47 


Street Lights Reported Out by Police 


102 


Power Failures 


6 


Robbery 


2 


Summonses Served 


166 



345 



51 



Suspicious .Motor Vehicles Reported 98 

Suspicious Persons Reported 123 

Suspicious Phone Calls Reported 70 

Wires Down 19 

Sudden Deaths Investigated 5 

False Alarms Investigated 5 

Committments to State and VA Hospitals 9 

During 1972, no new personnel were added to the Police Depart- 
ment. This Department presently consists of a Chief, two Sergeants, 11 
Patrolmen, a Secretary, and nine Traffic Supervisors. 

I am again requesting additional personnel. In order to patrol the 
Town effectively, check business areas, investigate accidents, man the 
ambulance, and investigate crimes, we must grow with the Town. 

The national average of Police Officers per 1000 population is 1.8. 
In Medfield, our ratio is 1.3 per 1000 population. 

Shortly after January 1, 1973, another vacancy will occur within the 
Department, with the resignation of Officer Patrick W. Clancy. 

The Division of Civil Service held a Police entrance examination dur- 
ing September and October, which was taken by approximately 17,000 
people .As of December 31, 1972, however, the marks have not been sent 
out. Therefore we still have two men working as full-time Patrolmen 
without benefits, raises or clothing allotments. These men are doing the 
same work as full time regular Patrolmen. 

I am requesting that the position of Provincial Police Officer be given 
step raises above that of the category of Special Police Officer. 

Considering the type of Civil Service exam that was given, and 
the suits pending against it, I doubt if we will ever get any certified 
names from the list enabling us to appoint full-time Officers. Until we 
make the Provisional position more attractive, we are going to have 
difficulty attracting qualified personnel. 

I also feel that the minimum salary for Permanent Patrolmen is 
too low, and that five steps are too many to reach maximum. I recom- 
mend three steps from minimum to maximum. 

Mrs. John Raffin has worked in the Department for the year, as 
Secretary, keeping records, typing reports and correspondence, and 
computing the payroll, thereby freeing the Officers for more duty. Due 
to changes in the federally-funded EEA program, I am requesting that 
the Town establish the position of part-time secretary for the Department. 
I am also requesting another Officer to be added to the Department in 



52 



1973, and would like to have one Officer available for full-time investi- 
gator. 

Another item of concern to me is the need for a third cruiser. We 
have two cruisers patrolling the Town most of the day and night. With 
so many residents living in the outer perimeters of the Town, such as the 
areas of Orchard Street, Granite Street, Stagecoach Road, Indian Hill 
and Gun Hill in the south end, and the Harding and Marlyn Estates in 
the north end, it is impossible to patrol effectively with one car. 

MEDFIELD'S BUSINESS CENTER AT NIGHT AFTER 
SNOWFALL. 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

Many times, we are left with only one car because of maintenance, or 
because we have to use one car to go to court. For the safety of the com- 
munity, we must purchase a third cruiser. We may find that we can 
utilize one car so that it needs replacement every 2, 3 or 4 years. During 
1972, our two cruisers were driven a total of 135,010 miles. 

I am again requesting that the Town Meeting create a committee to 
study the need for added space for the Police Department, either by ex- 
panding the present Station, or by building a new Police Station. W T e are 
in dire need of more space. 

During the year, drug talks were given by Chief Mann to Grades 4, 
5 and 6, and also to Religious Education classes, Kiwanis, Lions, and 
private groups. Safety talks and Safety film showings w T ere conducted by 
Chief Mann and Safety Officer John T. Garvey to private kindergartens, 
all grades of the public schools, Religious Education classes. Also to 
School Bus Drivers, as well as to the Traffic Supervisors, and private 
groups. 



53 



Many hours were spent on the Safety Campaign, and we believe it is 
a do finite aid in making our community safer. I have requested funds for 
Alms and equipment in order to continue and expand this program. 

Under the Highway Safety Program, the state will reimburse the 
Town for purchases of safety films and equipment. Also in conjunction 
wtih highway and pedestrian safety I am requesting funds to purchase a 
new radar timer, also reimburseable under the Highway Safety Program. 
The radar timer we are now using is almost 8 years old, and maintenance 
is costly. We have had many requests for speed traps in all parts of 
town. With the new radar, we could slow traffic at two locations for as 
long as the present radar is operable. 

In the furtherance of their Police Education and knowledge, Chief 
Mann attended the New England Police Institute at Babson College, for 
a course in Police Management; Sgt. lafolla and Officer Brady are con- 
tinuing their courses at the Police Science Institute at Dean Junior Col- 
lege; Officers Bishop and Clancy completed the tratining courses of 8 
and 10 weeks respectively at the State Police Academy in Framingham. 

In November, the Department purchased a Breathalyzer unit for use 
in cases involving drunkenness, with funds from the Highway Safety 
Program. Training to operate the Breathalyzer was received by Officers 
Bishop and Wheeler. 

In May, an Open House was held at the Police Station, in conjunc- 
tion with National Police Week. Over 100 citizens toured the Station, 
observing operation of the teletype machine, as well as various means 
of investigation such as the Identi-Kit, Fingerprint Kit, and ultraviolet 
light. 

On Hallowe'en, a party was held at the Dale Street School with 
over 500 children attending. Sponsored by the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, 
the idea had the complete backing and support of the Police Department. 
I wish to thank Peter DiMezza, David Munroe and Frank Simonetti, Jr., 
and all those who assisted in conducting this function, and hope that it 
will be an annual event. 

In December, the Fire Department Alarm transmitter was installed, 
reducing the time necessary to sound the alarm calling out the Firemen. 

The universal emergency phone number, 911, will be in effect in 
Medfield on or about May 1, 1973. When this is in operation, Medfield 
residents will be able to dial 911 for fire, ambulance and police emer- 
gencies. 

I wish to thank all department heads of the Town, and their person- 
nel for all the cooperation I have received throughout the year. We 

54 



could not perform many of our duties as well, if it were not for the fine 
help we receive from them. 

I wish to say "thank you" especially to Mr. Thomas Blake, who re- 
tired this year as Superintendent of Schools for his assistance to the 
Police Department in his many years of service in the Medfield School 
system. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM H. MANN 
Chief of Police 



WARRANT COMMITTEE DELIBERATES TOWN FINANCES. 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 



55 



REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my third annual report as Fire Chief for the year 
ending December 31, 1972. 

Patrolling of business & industrial areas is being done daily, which 
keeps the fire hazards down. 

Inspections and fire drills are held quarterly in all schools, the 
Nursing Home and State Hospital. 

Fire prevention programs were held in the elementary schools and 
Fire Station during Fire Prevention Week. 

One Fire Fighter attended Bristol Community College Fire Science 
Course, 4 men attended a week-end seminar sponsored by the Massa- 
chusetts Fire Academy and 5 men attended a Cardio-Pulmonary Resusci- 
tation Course sponsored by the Norwood and Milford Hospitals. 

Audio film training is conducted during the winter months and 
outdoor drills are held twice each month during the summer months. 

This year I will be asking for a Chief's vehicle and a chassis to 
replace the one on the forest truck. 

The Fire Alarm Transmitter was moved from Medfield State Hospi- 
tal down to the Police Station during the last week of December. 

The Mutual Aid Pact with surrounding towns proved its worth for 
Medfield during the Laundromat fire in our business district. 

The services rendered during 1972 are classified as follows: 

Buildings 27 

Brush & Grass 39 

State Hospital 1 

Automobiles & Trucks 13 

Rubbish 4 

Gasoline Washdowns 7 

Highway Accidents 5 

Electrical 14 

Oil Storage Permits 78 

Inspections 442 

Propane Gas Permits 11 



56 



Model Rocket Permits 

Investigations 

Oil or Gas Burners 

Mutual Aid 

Outside Assistance 

Lock Outs 

Bomb Scares 

Still Alarms 

False Alarms 

Pumping Cellars 

Station Duty 

Dump 

Blasting Permits 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 

Televisions 



10 
47 
10 
12 

2 

2 

14 
62 
14 

9 
17 


30 
74 

2 



I would like to extend my sincere thanks for the cooperation of the 
officers and men of the department, members of the Police Department, 
Secretaries in the Town office, building and gas inspectors, fire alarm 
operators and all other Town Departments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. RYAN 
Fire Chief 



BOY SCOUTS DELIVER TOWN MEETING NOTICES 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 



57 



REPORT OF OPERATION OF TOWN AMBULANCE 

Wc hereby submit the Annual Report of the Operation and Main- 
tenance of the Town of Medfield Ambulance Service for the year ending 
December 31, 1972: 

Ambulance trips made in 1972 200 

Budget expended in 1972 $3,953.87 
Insurance Coverage 97.07 

Total amount billed for 1972 3,440.00 

Outstanding bills for 1972 1,025.00 
Outstanding bills for 1970 420.00 



Total outstanding bills $1,445.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY A. KELLEHER, Chairman 
WESTON G. KOLSTI, Clerk 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 

Board of Selectmen 



REPORT OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

The many volunteers of the Civil Defense Department had had a 
busy and productive year. The auxilary police have held monthly meet- 
ings and drills, some providing extra police coverage on the more active 
holidays like Fourth of July and Halloween. 

New volunteers have been recruited for communications, shelter and 
emergency center operations. Many more are needed to fill the roster as 
required under Federal directives. 

The Civil Defense emergency truck has had many runs with the 
Fire Department under the direction of Chief Ryan. The lighting and 
power equipment have made many an emergency situation a safer one 
with good portable lighting and effecting a quicker rescue with the 

58 



proper equipment. This vehicle has been parked outside subject to the 
weather year round. Hopefully with the completion of the new highway 
garage it can be repainted and parked inside. 

The surplus property program continues to return the annual Civil 
Defense budget five or six fold in useful equipment and supplies to be 
used by all Town departments. Our elegibility for surplus property is 
based on the Town appropriating funds for Civil Defense and having an 
active organization. 

Thanks to the many volunteers giving of their time, talents and 
ideas, and the cooperation of the other Town departments, Medfield has 
one of the better Civil Defense organizations in the State. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. C. BUCHANAN 

Director 



REPORT OF THE WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

1971 1972 1973 1974 

Actual Actual Estimate Estimate 

Total Services 2,189 2,269 2,369 2,429 

New Services 14 80 100 60 

Thousand Gallons Pumped 296,112 269,884 338,000 184,000 

Thousand Gallons Sold 237,887 210,000 280,000 153,000 

Water Sold $130,355. $126,390. $152,000. $ 83,000. 

Departmental Operating 

Expenses $ 60,839. $ 59,555. $ 74,452. $ 41,903. 

Debt Services : 

Smith Station & Wells $ 35,775. $ 34,725. $ 33,675. $ 31,575. 



59 



Growth oi water consumption during the past year continued with both 
total sales and sales per customer increasing. Some portions of the water 
system were severely strained to meet the requirements of the customers. 
To meet present water requirements and projected immediate future 
growth, the Hoard started planning for improvement of portions of the 
distribution system. 

The water supply from the Town's three wells was adequate as peak 
demands were supplied from elevated water storage. Because of the in- 
creased consumption and future possible outage of the elevated water 
storage, the Board began planning to increase the supply with the addi- 
tion of a new well. 

Engineering of the new sewerage system and treatment plant was 
completed. The Board continued its planning for the new sewer facility. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN D. WILLIAMS, Chairman 

JOHN C. WILLIS, Clerk 

KENNETH W. MACEK 



REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Medfield Planning Board hereby submits its Annual Report for 
the year ending December 31, 1972. 

Meetings: The Planning Board held regular weekly meetings at the 
Town Hall. In addition to these meetings numerous inspections were 
made by Board members to examine areas proposed for new subdivisions 
and subdivisions already under construction. 

Subdivisions: Plans for new subdivisions were presented to the 
Board for its action. 

60 



A table is included showing subdivision lots approved for 
building, number of lots released during the year for building 
and the number of lots remaining in each subdivision to be 
built. The table runs from 1956 to date. 

(SEE SEPARATE SHEET FOR TABLE ) 

The portion of Colonial Road from Station 15 + 04 to Station 19 + 80 
was recommended to the Board of Selectmen for acceptance. 

Other Matters: A revision of the Zoning By-law of the Town of 
Medfield was approved by the Town Meeting in March 1972. This was a 
culmination of five years' work of the Board. During 1972 a subcommittee 
on a new Sign By-law was formed consisting of Mrs. Sandra G. Munsey 
and Mr. Robert A. Vanslette of the Planning Board and Messrs. Vincent 
Palumbo, Francis Rossi, Winfred Crocker and William Walsh, repre- 
senting the business community. 

The Planning Board worked with the Master Plan Implementation 
Committee and Mr. James Woglom of Metcalf & Eddy to make a 
Housing Impact Study as a continued updating of the original Master 
Plan as authorized by the Town Meeting of 1972. 

General: The Planning Board would like to express its appreciation 
to the many citizens, Town officials and builders who gave the Board 
their cooperation and assistance in 1972. 

All regular Planning Board meetings are open to the public. Requests 
for information may be obtained from the Planning Board Assistant, Mrs. 
John C. Willis, at either 359-8505 or 359-2726. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM F. ROGERS, JR., Chairman 
ROBERT A. VANSLETTE, V-Chr. 
F. GORDON YARLOTT, Secretary 
BURGESS P. STANDLEY 
SANDRA G. MUNSEY 



61 



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65 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Hoard of Selectmen: 

In line with updating the original Master Plan in parts, the Town 
voted at the Annual Town Meeting, March, 1972, as the second phase, 
a "Physical-Social-Economic Impact Study of Various Types of Housing 
Upon the Town of Medfield." MPIC members coordinated the sending of 
4 Housing Impact Questionaires: one to Town Officials, one to Apartment 
Owners, one to Tenants, and one to Realtors, Developers, Builders and 
Banks. Meetings were then held with representatives of the various 
Town Departments, MPIC, the Planning Board and 'Mr. James Woglom 
of Metcalf & Eddy. Mr. Woglom is now finishing the final report, based 
on results of the Questionaires and discussions with the Town Depart- 
ments — to be released before the March, 1973 Town Meeting. 

Other recommendations of the Master Plan acted upon by the 
Town: 

1. Start of construction of the Town Garage. 

2. Acceptance of a new Medfield Town Charter 

3. Acquisition of additional land on Noon Hill by the Conservation 
Commission. 

4. Dismissal of an article to relocate a portion of Green Street. 

5. Passage of a new Zoning By-law, except for signs. 

6. Start of construction on the relocation of Route 27 north of 
Route 109. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. ELIZABETH M. PLACE, Chairman 

MR. RICHARD STURTEVANT, V-Chr. 

MR. EDWARD MEEHAN, resigned 

MR. STANLEY ROSSIER 

MRS. GRACE P. RITCHIE, Secretary 

MR. JOSEPH DONNELLY 

MR. RICHARD KAERWER 

MR. PAUL HURD 

MR. JAMES LOER 

MRS. JEANNE SCHUTTE 



fi« 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The Board of Appeals on Zoning submits, herewith, the report for 
the year ending December 31, 1972. 

The Board was organized at a meeting held on April 6, 1972 as 
follows : 

Charles Kenny, Chairman 

James T. Regan, Clerk 

James O. Aronson 

Ralph C. Copeland, Associate Member 

Mrs. Karen Halloran, Secretary 

During the year nine hearings were held at the Town Hall and in 
summary, decisions were as follows : 

2 Permits for "Home Occupation" business. Granted. 

2 Permits for "Home Occupation" business. Denied. 

1 Variance for gasoline service station. Granted. 

1 Variance concerning on-site sewerage system. Denied. 

1 Permit for tennis-swimming pool club. Granted. 

1 Variance concerning inadequate lot frontage. Denied. 

1 Permit for kennel-veterinary hospital. Granted. 

In each case the decision of the Board of Appeals was unanimous. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES KENNY 

Chairman 



67 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Public use of library facilities in Medfield continued to increase in 
Circulation increased 9.o r /c last year to 59,223 volumes. Thirteen 
hundred and eleven (1,311) new volumes were purchased by the library 
which brought our collection to 17,084 books. 

The library has continued to add special services for Medfield citi- 
zens. The collection of large print books for citizens with visual difficulties 
was increased substantially. The enrollment in the children's preschool 
reading program was large enough to require two sessions per week. 
A new bookstack was added in the Dailey room. 

Once again, it is necessary to point out that the existing facilities are 
not adequate to provide the reading space, volume storage, and staff 
assistance for Medfield citizens. In a 1967 report written for the Trustees 
by a library consultant, our facilities were deemed inadequate by Ameri- 
can Library Association standards. Five years later, with approximately 
15% more population, our facilities are even more crowded. We trust 
that the Town will see the necessity for adding space to the Public 
Library within the next 2 to 3 years. 

The Trustees met eleven times last year and dealt with a variety of 
topics. Action was taken on the installation of a new bookstack, repairs to 
the front stairs, and repainting of the children's room. The Trustees 
Manual was completed giving each Trustee and the Town a history of 
the library and information on many policies developed for library man- 
agement. The Trustees met with students, Friends of the Library, and 
several Town Boards in an effort to provide adequate service last year. 

The Trustees wish to publicly acknowledge the fine work done by our 
Head Librarian, Assistant and Children's Librarians, Aides and Custodian 
over the past year. We also wish to acknowledge the cooperations and 
patience of our patrons. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KENNETH G. FETTIG, Chairman 
JAMES F. BARTON, V. Chairman 
LUCILE STURTEVANT, Secretary 
MARY HAY, Personnel 
LAURA SMITH, Repairs 
EDWARD JENKINS, Fin. Sec. 
Board of Trustees 



68 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

I hereby submit my fourth annual report as Librarian for the year 
ending December 31, 1972. 

STATISTICS 

Circulation Figures 



Adult Department 


38,390 




Children's Room 


20,637 




Interlibrary Loan 


196 




Total Circulation 




59,223 


New Books Purchased 






Adult 


959 




Juvenile 


352 




Total Acquisitions 




1,311 



Volumes owned as of December 31, 1972 17,034 

New borrowers registered during 1972 792 

A comparison of 1972 statistics with those of 1971 shows a 63% in- 
crease in books borrowed on interlibrary loan to fulfill requests for 
titles not available in our library. Also, over sixty films were obtained 
from Boston Public Library during the year, primarily for classes in the 
schools. This tapping of resources in surrounding libraries of which Med- 
field is a part. 

A further comparison of the statistics reveals it was possible to 
purchase only 5% more books in 1972 than in 1971 even though the 
amount of money in the book fund in 1972 was 10% higher. This situa- 
tion is caused by the continual increase in the price of books. The addi- 
tional money requested in the budget for book purchases was turned down. 

As a gesture of good will to the many senior citizens who use the 
library, the Trustees voted to eliminate charging fines for overdue 
books. Another change in policy was established by extending borrowing 
privileges to patients at Medfield State Hospital, Harding House and 
Our Brothers Place. The only requirement placed on these borrowers 
is a statement of approval by the applicant's physician or supervisor. 

The enormous undertaking of an inventory has begun and is about 
half finished. This has been accomplished without hiring extra per- 
sonnel and progress has necessarily been slow. 

69 



Because of its continued popularity, the story Hour for preschool 
children has again been held two afternoons a week. Over ninety chil- 
dren registered which meant some had to remain on a waiting list until 
openings became available. The craft projects included in the program 
have been popular as well as the parties celebrating holidays. A new 
record player was given to the library for use at Story Hour by Mrs. 
Lowell Cunningham, Mrs. John Crawley, and Mrs. Jerry Lake, and for 
this we are most appreciative. 

An increase of 42 % in the number of young readers involved in the 
Summer Reading Program kept competition keen for the prizes awarded 
to each age group. A record number of books read by one child was set at 
136 during the six week program. As a treat for all who read at least five 
books, a free movie was shown at the end of the six weeks. To facilitate 
use of the library during the summer the children's room was opened two 
additional hours in the mornings as well as the regular afternoon hours. 

An added feature to the activities offered for the children has been 
the availablility of puzzles and games which can be played at the library. 
To those who donated these materials, we are most grateful. 

In the area of personnel, it has been necessary to hire an additional 
staff member to work on our two busiest nights each week. By vote of 
Town Meeting, the Head Librarian's hours were increased from twenty 
to thirty hours a week. During the year I had the opportunity to serve 
as Vice-Chairman of the Wellesley Regional Library Advisory Board. 

The library will miss Mrs. Ernest Spencer, our Senior Library Aide, 
who retired in November after many years of excellent service. 

My sincere thanks to the Library Board of Trustees and my staff 
for their continued support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JANE B. ARCHER 

Head Librarian 



REGULAR STAFF 

Jane B. Archer, Head Librarian 
Alice S. Ripley Frances Copithorne 

Assistant Librarian Children's Librarian 



70 



AIDES 



Constance Yena 
Ruth Justice 
Barbara Gray 
Carla Billingham 
Kathleen Goodwin 



Deborah Kalweit 
Regina Kalweit 
Maria Lynch 
Deborah Hunt 
Ellen Morse 



CUSTODIAN 
Vincent Bravo 



August 18, 1972 

FLAG IS LOWERED BY POSTMASTER THOMAS SWEENEY 
AND ELIZABETH SWEENEY ON CLOSING OF HARDING 
POST OFFICE. 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 



71 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

Following the Town elections at which Charles Sloan was re-elected 
to a five-year term, the Authority reorganized as follows: 

David Iverson Chairman 

Herbert B. Burr, Sr. Vice Chairman 

Charles D. Sloan Treasurer 

Richard C. J. Palson Assistant Treasurer 

Hazel R. Frank Secretary 

Mrs. William Conners has continued as corresponding secretary for 
the year and has, as always, been a valuable asset to the Authority. 

Attorney Algernon Heine of Ashland has continued as legal adviser. 

Throughout the year the Authority has met the second and fourth 
Tuesday of each month at 7:30 P.M. at the Town House. We have investi- 
gated many proposals by private developers. None of the proposals were 
acceptable at this time. 

With the help of Mr. John Callow of the Senior Citizens Club, and 
the Council on Aging, the Authority conducted another survey for need 
of housing, and the results showed that approximately 100 apartments 
are needed to house the town's elderly. 

The Housing Authority has completed another long and ungratifying 
year. At this writing the Department of Community Affairs is following 
through in the paper work to take the Pound Street site by eminent 
domain. 

Hopefully, the Authority will be able to start construction of the 40 
unit Elderly Housing in the late spring of 1973. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID IVERSON 

Chairman 



72 






REPORT OF THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

As in the past our major goal has been land acquisition. Three par- 
cels of land were purchased and another obtained by gift. The latter 
consists of 5.3 acres and was generously donated by Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Baldwin. Several other properties will be acquired soon as a 
result of current negotiations. Furtheremore, the Town reecived $18,000 
from the Department of Natural Resources as the State's share of reim- 
bursement for 72 acres along the Charles River purchased last year. The 
Commission anticipates other reimbursements during the next year. 

The annual Fader Award was given to Mr. Daniel C. Hinkley who 
contributed much to the Town during his ten years of service on the 
Commission prior to his death in 1971. This year the Commission awarded 
a scholarship to Brian Murphy who attended the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp in Spencer. Details concerning eligibility for this 
scholarship during the upcoming year can be obtained by contacting 
any of the commissioners. 

Several members of the Commission have cooperated with Mr. 
Filliades, science coordinator in the Medfield Public Schools, in his efforts 
to better utilize the "Outdoor Classroom" adjacent to the Ralph Wheelock 
elementary school. We feel that much has been accomplished. The Boy 
Scouts are to be commended for lending valuable man-power assistance 
in clearing trails and setting up the classroom. Also, the Medfield Garden 
Club provided funds for plantings which will enhance the teaching value 
of the classroom. 

Since September much consideration has been given to the new Wet- 
lands Protection Act (Chapter 131 Section 40) which is a combination 
of the Hatch Act and the Jones Act as of October 16, 1972. This Act em- 
powers local Conservation Commissions to conduct hearings insofar as 
"the law requires that no person shall remove, fill, dredge or alter any 
bank, fceach, dune, flat, marsh, meadow or swamp bordering on any 
creek, river, stream, pond or lake or any land subject to flooding without 
riling written notice of intention including such plans as may be neces- 
sary to describe the proposed activity and its effect on the environment." 
This new Act should provide needed environmental protection throughout 
the State via closer local control. 

We w^ould like to gratefully acknowledge donations from the Med- 
field Garden Club and from Mr. Frederick Harrison. Thanks are also due 
Mrs. Caroline Standley, a new associate member, for her donation of 
secretarial services during the past year. 



73 



Please note thai anyone interested in becoming an Associate Member 
of the Commission should contact the Chairman. In addition, all persons 
are cordially invited to any of our meetings usually held the fourth 
Thursday of each month at 7:30 P.M. in the Town Hall. 

Respectfully submitted. 

DR. ROBERT HILTON, Chairman 

MRS. ELLEN GIFFORD 
JOSEPH DONNELLY, JR. 
DR. RICHARD HEILIGMANN 
PETER SCHROEDER 
ROBERT KINSMAN 
MARIO PEDERZINI 

Conservation Commission 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
CEMETERY COMMISIONER 

Honorable Board of Selectmen. 
Gentlemen: 

Although it has been a continuous battle against weather, weeds, 
drought and vandalism, we have enjoyed a successful season at the Vine 
Lake Cemetery. 

To report the good news, we wish to thank all the Town Departments 
for their assistance in our work. To the Executive Secretary, Fred 
Conley and his staff — our thanks for his devotion in keeping us within 
our budget and to the Highway Dept. for the use of their men and 
equipment when needed. 

The bad news: 

1 Shall we ask the Town to raise and appropriate a sum of 

money to erect a fence and suitable gates around the cemetery, and 
post hours of their opening? 

74 



2 — Ask the Town to sponsor a course of training to the parents in 
how to teach their children to respect the Cemetery — what it stands for 
and the respect for the rights of others? 

3 — To ignore the problem and ask for an additional sum of money 
in our budget to repair such damages as can be repaired! 

Quite often the damages are to such an extent and nature that it 
cannot be repaired, and a little bit of history is lost forever. 

The general public has been most helpful in aiding the department 
to keep the Cemetery in condition, and we acknowledge their co-operation. 

The 1973 season will have the same problems — weather, weeds, 
doughts and vandalism, and higher costs for what we purchase, on a 
higher-average budget. So be it! 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER F. REYNOLDS, JR. 
ALLISON T. CARR 
JOSEPH A. ROBERTS, JR. 
Cemetery Commissioners 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of the Town of Medfield: 

The following is the report of the Board of Health for the year 
beginning January 1, 1972 through December 31, 1972. 

The Board met regularly on the second and fourth Thursday of each 
month, and additional meetings were held with various Town depart- 
ments. Pertinent State meetings were also attended by Board members. 



75 



PERMITS 

The following permits wore issued during the year 1972: 

Retail Food Licenses 5 

Food Establishment Permits 14 

Catering Permits 3 

Milk & Oleo 8 

Horse Permits 25 

Effluent Cartage 7 

Laundromats 1 

Funeral Directors 3 

Septic Installers Permits 16 

On-Site Sewage Disposal Permits 54 

Church Food Sale Permits were also issued as well as food service 
permits for various civic organizations. 

Total income from all permits amounted to $1,668.00. 

GARBAGE 

The garbage contract was renewed with Francis J. Cassidy of Med- 
way with collections scheduled once a week during winter months and 
twice a week during summer months. This is the twenty-fifth year that 
Mr. Cassidy has been collecting in Medfield. 

REGULATIONS 

The Board adopted or amended the following septic rules during 
the year: 

1. The fee for an on-site sewage disposal permit was raised from 
$15.00 to $25.00. 

2. Paragraph 15 was amended to allow septic As Built plans to be 
drawn by our Registered Sanitarian as agent for the Board. 

3. Requirement that all plot plants submitted to the Board must 
show the Mean Sea Level elevations instead of assumed ele- 
vations. 

4. Use of Medfield School Health Forms mandatory in Day Care 
Centers. 

HORSES 

A total of 25 residents have registered their horses as required by 
State law. Other permits were also issued for the keeping of fowl, goats, 

76 



sheep and cows. Richard Ellsworth. Animal Inspector, works closely with 
the Board and with our Sanitarian, and his complete report may be found 
elsewhere. 

The Animal Inspector reminds all residents that all animal bites or 
scratches should be reported immediately to the police, Health Board, or 
directly to him in order that he may quarantine the animal, or make 
laboratory examinations. The keeping of wild animals or fowl is not 
permitted without a special license. 

SWIM POND 

The Board's Sanitarian, Mr. Ferial Morrissette, made weekly inspec- 
tions at the pond, with laboratory examinations made with each inspec- 
tion. The pond showed extremely low coliform counts constantly during 
the entire season. 

RABIES CLINIC 

The third Rabies Clinic was held in March in conjunction with the 
licensing of dogs by the Town Clerk. Under the direction of Dr. Gordon 
Goodband of Walpole, 197 dogs received rabies shots. According to State 
law, all dogs must be vaccinated for Rabies every 18 months. Dogs vac- 
cinated in 1971 should be immunized again in 1973. The Clinic is self- 
supporting with an approximate fee of S2 per vaccination. 

The fourth Rabies Clinic will be held in March of 1973. Dog licenses 
may be secured the same day as the Clinic from the Town Clerk, Mrs. 
Nancy Preston. 

REGISTERED SANITARIAN SANITARY INSPECTOR 

The Board accepted the resignation of Herbert B. Burr as Sanitary 
Inspector as of April first with much regret. Mr. Ferial Morrissette as- 
sumed the additional duties at that time. 

At the suggestion of Mr. Morrissette, the Board voted to waive their 
regulations regarding perc tests not being made in July and August due 
to the extremely high water table being experienced this year. Mr. Mor- 
rissette will also enforce the State rules on slopes of all nature with full 
approval from the State engineers. Under this rule, no leaching field may 
be situated less than 50 feet from where a slope is steeper than 1 vertical 
to two horizontal; also, all leaching areas must be back 25 feet from the 
edge of filled land on all lots lines. 



77 



SANITARY INSPECTOR 

A total of 51 permits were issued for on-site sewage during the year, 
all systems bein^ inspected for final installation as well as for original ob- 
servation pits and perc tests in accordance with Article XI, and the 
Medfield Septic Regulations. 

Over thirty complaints were investigated during the year, most of 
which involved septic overflow, and many consultations were held with the 
Health Board, as well as with local engineers and contractors. All engin- 
eers and builders were most cooperative regarding changes in septic 
plans and site placements. 

Over thirty inspections were made for backfilling systems during 
the year and Certificates of Compliance issued on completion. 

Many of the complaints emanating from overflowing septic systems 
were the result of extreme high water table, resulting in closer checks 
on all new systems. Other complaints regarding drainage are investigated 
by the Health Sanitarian, although such drainage problems result from 
lack of engineered street drainage, which drainage is the prerogative of 
Town engineers who obtain the necessary engineering data on street 
drainage to be made available to the building department as well as the 
health department and planning board. While this information is always 
available in sub-divisions, old Town streets and roads with poor drainage 
still remain a problem to the Town, and can only be corrected by 
vote at Town meetings. 

PUBLIC HEALTH INSPECTIONS 

Mr. Morrissette, R. S. reports that all food service establishments, 
school cafeterias, mobile canteens, caterers and retail food stores were 
inspected quarterly. All food service establishments were found to be in 
compliance with the Mass. Sanitary Code regarding sanitizing of eating 
utensils, with all such establishments now having automatic dishwashing 
equipment. Day Care Centers were inspected and found to comply with 
the Regulations of the Mass. Dept. of Public Health. 

During the shellfish emergency, the Sanitarian visited all neces- 
sary restaurants and retail food stores to insure no contaminated shell- 
fish would be sold. Notices promulgated by the Dept. of Public Health 
were left with each establishment, and follow-up calls made from time 
to time to keep the store managers aware of changes in orders. 

Other inspections included private and commercial stables, the po- 
lice lockup, funeral home, and nursing home. All were found to be in good 
condition with the bacterial count on the nursing home utensils excellent 
and kitchen cleanliness above average. 

78 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Visiting Nurse Association, under Mrs. Porter Whitney, who 
serves as the Public Health Nurse in Medfield for the Board of Health, 
reports a total of 327 visits made in Medfield, covering 74 cases. These 
visits include bedside care, therapeutic nursing, public health nursing 
involving TB prevention and follow-ups, communicable diseases, new 
born, maternal care, health teaching and referrals and premature infants. 

Mrs. Whitney made 8 inspections during the year at the Day Care 
Centers in Town, giving a teaching session on general hygiene for each 
school, and checking all health certificates regularly. 

Two Immunization Clinics were held immunizing 217 persons for 
Rubella, Mumps, Diptheria, Tetanus, Whooping Cough, Polio, Measles and 
Smallpox, and the Glaucoma Clinic was also attended by the Public 
Health Nurse. 

Mrs. Whitney made 7 visits to the Senior Citizens Club testing 67 
persons for blood pressure and giving minor health counseling. Two 
flu clinics were held for the club immunizing 54 persons. 

Other duties of the Public Health Nurse involves assisting at Pre- 
school Vision testing, telephone conferences for advice and/or referral 
(of which 57 calls were handled) ; lending of sick room equipment such as 
beds, wheel chairs, walkers, crutches, serving 23 persons with such 
equipment. 

The Board of Health has established a Vaccine Center under the 
direction of Mrs. Whitney who stocks and inventories same, making vac- 
cines and various test kits available to local physicians. 

Tine Testing for TB is handled by the public health agent, Mrs. 
Madeleine Harding, School Nurse, and all records maintained by her. 

The Public Health Nurse also serves on the Medfield Home Commit- 
tee, American Cancer Organization, as well as prepared statistics for the 
Mass. Dept. of Public Health, attending its meetings and seminars. 

The Board wishes to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Morrissette, 
Mrs. Whitney, Mr. Ellsworth, the Town Clerk, and Dr. A. R. Stagg con- 
sulting physician, Mrs. Kathleen Conners for their continuing efforts in 
the administration of the Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK X. CURRY, Chairman 
FREDERIC C. TEMPLE, Clerk 
GERARD F. GALLAGHER 

Medfield Board of Health 
79 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
MEDFIELD COUNCIL ON AGING 

IV): Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
Residents of Medfield 

With the pasage of 1972, your Council On Aging has marked the 
second anniversary of its formation. During 1972, we have continued 
in our endeavours to, first, determine the common needs and aspirations 
of our senior citizens and, secondly, to formulate and finance programs 
to meet same. While the matter of housing for the elderly is not speci- 
fically within our jurisdiction, it remains, perhaps, the primary need of 
many of our senior brethren. For this reason, the Council On Aging has 
interceded for the senior citizens in this regard and feel confident that 
during the forthcoming year construction of this facility will be com- 
menced. In our capacity as intercessors, we have also sought to explain 
reasons attending delays in the execution of this project and to allay the 
concerns of our senior brethren, so many times expressed to us. 

At last year's Town Meeting, we had originally requested an appro- 
priation of $250.00 for capital expenditures and $750.00 for programs for 
seniors. Our original request for program funds was deferred, pending 
clarification of our responsibilities as a Council. At a subsequent Town 
Meeting, our earlier request was approved and we were able to initiate 
further programs and recreational activities for the seniors, which we 
hope to continue. These funds were used to defray the cost of several bus 
tours, sponsored for the benefit of our senior citizens to various sites, 
including Woods Hole, Cathedral of The Pines, Lasalette Shrine, Attle- 
boro Zoo and a Christmas Shopping Tour to Natick Mall. These trips 
proved most popular and enabled participation by all interested seniors. 
In addition, arrangements for senior consultations with a visiting nurse 
at the Community Center on a weekly basis have been concluded. Addi- 
tionally, under the heading of medical services, a program enabling 
seniors to obtain physical exams and lab tests at Medfield State Hospital 
for the low cost of $2.00 has been initiated. The senior citizens are also 
busied with a variety of other activities, including crewel classes, sewing 
classes, bowling, whist parties, monthly general meetings and monthly 
entertainment meetings. Additional capital expenditures to support these 
programs have been made, including the purchase of card tables, chairs, 
speaker system, turntable and sound projector and screen. 

The Council has expanded its own horizons of involvement in senior 
citizens' matters by becoming affiliated with a regional group of Councils 
from neighboring towns. Representatives from the Medfield Council have 
been meeting regularly with this Regional Group to explore and exchange 
ideas and goals for seniors. 

We are anxious to establish a full-time permanent drop-in center 
for senior citizens in Medfield, comparable to those existing in neighboring 

80 






communities. Because of the heavy schedule of use imposed on the 
Community Center, we do not feel this facility is adequate for this pur- 
pose and hope to find another location, where such a full-time drop-in 
center might be established. 

The Council notes with regret the passing of one of its Charter 
Members, Orrin Wilkins, who contributed so much in terms of time, 
constructive effort and ideas to the formation and direction of the 
Medfield Council On Aging. The vacancy, occasioned by his decease, 
has been filled by the appointment of Reverend David Flanders to the 
Council. Two original Council members, Ardus Hjelmstad and Jeanne 
Harding, due to the press of other commitments, tendered their resigna- 
tion in November of this year. We remain most grateful to these ladies 
for their contributions to our growth and their full cooperation and 
dedication during their two years of service. Mr. Gerald Bangs has 
been appointed by the Board of Selectmen to fill one of the vacancies 
thus created and we are hopeful that the remaining vacancy will be 
filled soon. 

We remain grateful to the Senior Citizens, the Officers and residents 
of the Town of Medfield for their cooperation and support of our en- 
deavours. We look forward to further progress in the realization of our 
goals in 1973 and feel confident of the continuing support of all in these 
matters. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH GOOD, JR., President 
VIRGINIA COUPER, Secretary 
WILLIAM CLEAR Y, Treasurer 
MADELENE HARDING 
CHARLES BOURKE 
CHARLES DOYLE 
GERALD BANGS 
REV. DAVID FLANDERS 

Council On Aging Commission 



81 



REPORT OF THE 
PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 

and residents of the Town of Medfield: 

1972 has been a very active year for the Park & Recreation Commis- 
sion. Under our sponsorship, various recreational programs and activi- 
ties have been provided for virtually every day of the week, encompassing 
all age groups. 

Basketball for adults, senior high school boys, junior high school 
boys, and an instructional class and game for fourth, fifth, and sixth 
grade boys, provided plenty of activity in this area. 

Soccer continued to be a major activity with three teams entered 
in the Boston Area Youth Soccer League (BAYS) and two teams in the 
Pioneer Youth Soccer League. Also, a Senior High School team was 
organized by the Park & Recreation Commission to play in the Norfolk 
Soccer Association. A girls soccer program, involving over a hundred 
girls, was organized and played intra-mural games. The Commission was 
able to secure the services of Mr. Hubert Vogelsinger, Head Soccer 
Coach of Yale University, to head up several instructional clinics, and a 
series of clinics were held for referees and game officials under the 
direction of professional and well known soccer personalities. Our boys 
were invited to attend several of the local college games and even served 
as ball boys for some of these. They also attended a professional game. 

The Swimming Pond enjoyed another successful season with 1455 
registered swimmers, contributing $2145.00 in fees to the Town. More 
than 1140 signed up for swimming instruction, ranging in age from pre- 
school to adults, and from beginners to senior life saving classes. A 
most competent staff, under the direction of Arnold Marcus, with Margo 
Mastropieri as head swimming instructor, provided excellent instruction 
and direction. The Medfield Marlins swimming team again competed in 
matches with neighboring towns. The Pond was greatly benefited by the 
installation of the aeration/destratification system, authorized at last 
year's annual Town Meeting. The water consistently met all tests for 
purity and cleanliness. 

The Playground Program had a high in attendance of 150, with a 
daily average of about 130. In addition to the usual games and classes in 
arts and crafts, the youngsters enjoyed a bicycle rodeo and a "Christmas 
in July" party. Field trips were made to a Red Sox Baseball game, to 
Duxbury Beach, and other historic and interesting spots. A visit from the 
Franklin Park Zoo Mobile was a high point of the session. 



82 



The vagaries of the weather did not permit much skating at the Swim 
Pond, although as many as 350 skaters did take advantage of the few 
times the ice permitted. The Commission will again undertake to keep 
the Pond clear of snow and available for skating, if the w r eather permits. 

The Youth Center, under the presidency of Glen Stokes, continues its 
successful activities and weekly entertainment for the young people of 
the Town, and continues to contribute greatly to the maintenance and 
upkeep of the Recreational Building. 

MEDFIELD SWIM POND'S FINEST. 




I J*!: 



Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

Other activities included a Ski Club, with as many as 60 making trips 
to nearby ski slopes, weather permitting, resulting in many novices becom- 
ing adept at this sport. A Cheerleading Group, meeting weekly, was most 
popular with over 200 taking part. A Baton Twirling Group of 20 to 30 
girls, meeting weekly, marched in Medfield's Memorial Day Parade and 
took part in parades in Marlboro and Norwood. Also, a Photography Club, 
a women's morning exercise club, and many other activities were suc- 
cessfully sponsored by the Commission. 

The first of twelve planned monthly programs for the Senior Citizens 
was a Square Dance in February, but action of the Annual Town Meeting 
and the May 15th Town Meeting removed the recreational activities of 
this group from the responsibility of the Park & Recreation Commis- 
sion and placed them under the Council on Aging. 

During the year, we suffered from serious and costly vandalism. The 
Recreation Building was broken into, resulting in considerable damage 
and the theft of equipment. The Bath House at the Swim Pond was also 
broken into, with major damage done. Several flags were stolen from the 



83 



parks, the halyards cut and stolen, and the pulleys destroyed. Several 
signs and other equipment were damaged or destroyed. All possible 
measures have been taken to prevent further such losses, but we urgently 
ask all citiz mis to be watchful and immediately report any suspicious in- 
cidents of this nature. 

In the year 1973 it is expected that all of our existing activities will 
be continued and enlarged upon and that several new programs will be 
initiated. We expect to increase the number of soccer teams in league 
play, to initiate a field hockey program for girls, to increase participation 
in volley ball, basketball, and numerous other sports. Also planned is 
an increase in instructional classes. It is hoped that monthly, or bi-month- 
ly entertainment programs can be arranged that will appeal to adults and 
interested groups. 

Our building and facilities are being used to maximum capacity, and 
the gyms and playing fields of the school department are used whenever 
available. As Medfield has grown, so have the demands for recreational 
programs and facilities. It is imperative that further facilities be provided 
to meet this demand and to permit the enlargement of existing programs 
and the initiating of new ones. The Park & Recreation Commission will be 
increased from the present five elected members to seven elected mem- 
bers at the March election. This will provide some of the needed man- 
power for the expanded programs. Also, efforts are being made to put 
Metacomet Park into use for badly needed playing fields. Some work has 
already been done toward this end, but money will be required to com- 
plete it and an Article will appear in the Annual Town Warrant for this 
purpose. If approved, we expect to complete, and put into use in 1973, soc- 
cer fields, Softball diamonds, volley ball courts, and other playing fields in 
this area. 

Robert Morrison resigned from the Commission and on May 2, 1972, 
by joint action of the Board of Selectmen and the Commission, Andrew F. 
Thompson, Jr. was appointed to fill the unexpired term. 

An election at Medfield High School resulted in Jill Vollmuth being 
the student selected to attend our meetings in 1972. Elected for 1973 are 
^Nancy Carlisle, Kay Cheeseborough, Kevin Cleary, Darlene Dogerty, Tom 
Henry, Kris Hansen, and Lucia Martino. We welcome the participation 
of these young people in our activities. 

Our thanks go to Richard Cantrell, Recreation Coordinator and 
Playground Director, for his unstinted time and efforts in making our 
various programs a success. We would like to thank, too, the many, many 
interested citizens who have volunteered their time and services in so 
m.'iny helpful ways, but the list is too long to name them. Also, we have 



H4 



enjoyed the whole-hearted cooperation and help of the other Town 
Departments and to them we express our deepest gratitude. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWARD M. BAYLISS, Chairman 
ROBERT H. LUKE, JR., Clerk 
BRIAN BYRXE 
WARREN E. SHEARD 
ANDREW F. THOMPSON, JR. 

Park & Recreation Commission 



FLOOD ON CAUSEWAY STREET, MARCH, 1972. 







&- -^fe* 



Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 



85 



REPORT OF THE 
NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Norfolk County Mosquito 
Control Project of its activities in the Town of Medfield for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1972. 

Aerial applied larvicide 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblowers 

Catch basin application for 

larvicide and adulticide 
Adulticide mistblowing from trucks 
Aerial U. L. V. adulticide application 
Drainage ditches cleaned 
Brush obstructing drainage cut 
Culverts cleaned and opened 
Drainage ditch construction 
Recorded calls for information and assistance 55 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALBERT W. HEUSER 
Superintendent 



1425 


acres 


232 


acres 


578 




4665 


acres 


3590 


feet 


300 feet 


25 




6 


feet 



OFFICE OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report for Veterans' Benefits Assistance and 
Veterans' Services for the year ending December 31, 1972. 

The case load of Veterans receiving ordinary assistance decreased 
from twenty in 1971 to fourteen in 1972. 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered 
Medfield Veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commis- 
sioner of Veterans' Services: 
Veterans' Benefits: 

86 



This assistance includes food, clothing, fuel, and medical expenses 
for Veterans and their dependents which the state reimburses fifty per- 
cent to the community. 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 24 

Benefits Administered 14 

Veterans' Services: 

This program is designed to orient and educate the veteran with 
regard to Federal and State programs of assistance and direct them 
toward the institutional programs. 

Hospitalization 7 

Education 20 

Burial Allownce 10 

Civil Service 6 

Social Security 17 

Pension Assistance 15 

I wish to thank Marie Burke, Charlotte Randolph, Philip Burr, Town 
Officials, Veterans Organizational Officers and Community Physicians for 
their cooperation and assistance this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PAUL F. CURRAN 
Veterans' Agent 



TOWN OF MEDFiELD 
1972 JURY LIST 

John R. Abernethy, 234 Causeway — Branch Manager 
Richard P. Ackerman, 3 Crest Circle — Director 
Dwight E. Adams, 22 Miller St. — Internal Auditor 
Ralph A. Baker, Jr., 36 Frairy St. — Machine Operator 
Ralph A. Baker, Sr., 39 Frairy St. — Maintenance 

87 



Donald H. Batting, IS Longmeadow Rd. — Radio News Announcer 

John Belmont, 40 Frairy St. — Machinist 

John C. Bertram, 16 Belknap Rd. Regional Manager 

Marion M. Blanchard, 32 Flint Locke Lane — Accounting Clerk 

John E. Booth, 20 Marlyn Rd. — Consultant 

Robert W. Boughton, 11 Charlesdale Rd. — Operations Analyst 

Thelma L. Bowditch, 79 Adams St. — Executive Cost Accountant 

Nancy Bravo, 336 Main St. — Cafeteria-Baker 

Raymond R. Brickley, 82 Adams St. — Electronics Supervisor 

Betty L. Burgess, 220 South St. — Housewife 

Margaret H. Cheesbrough, 34 Cross St. — Housewife 

Carlton S. Cheney, 23 Farm St. — Farmer-Self Employed 

Robert C. Chick, 253 Main St. — Manager, American Legion Hall 

Anthony J. Cieri, 5 Hearthstone Dr. — Administrative Sales Manager 

Harold A. Cloran, 26 Flint Locke Lane — Representative 

Anthony J. Cloutman, 4 Haven Rd. — Account Executive 

Richard G. Connors, 45 Curve St. — Comm'l. Insur. Account Executive 

Robert H. Cunningham, Snyder Rd. ■ — Manager Retail Sales 

Clara A. Denucci, 63 Frairy St. — Housewife 

Richard M. Devens, 15 High St. — Sales Engineer 

Joseph A. DiMezza, 26 Frairy St. — Foreman 

Thomas W. Eburne, 140 North St. — Senior Cost Estimator 

Barbara Ellsworth, 45 Hospital Rd. — Housewife 

Jessie A. Erskine, 5 Johns Ave. — Housewife 

William A. Felske, 101 Green St. — Accounting-Controller 

Eugene C. Fetteroll, Jr., 18 Pound St. — Director of Training 

Robert M. Finn, 19 Curve St. — Manager 

James J. Flynn, 16 Knollwood Rd. — Vice President 

Kenneth A. Fowler, 123 Harding St. — Development Eng. 

Walter M .Frank, 363 Main St. — Investment Banking 

James L. Gray, 6 Bow St. — Business Manager 



88 



Claire Green, 9 Spring Valley Rd. — Housewife 
June B .Harrison, 60 Orchard St. — Housewife 
Joseph S. Harvey, 56 Millbrook Rd. — Ass't. Sales Manager 
Donald A. Hay, 20 Hillcrest Rd. — Vice-President & General Manager 
Ralph S. Henry, 49 Elm St. — Investment Broker 
Douglas S. Heyman, 36 Adams St. — Salesman 
Kenneth W. Hill, 10 Belknap Rd. — District Sales Manager 
Edna M. Hinkley, 84 Harding St. — Housewife 
George W. Hinkley, Jr., 84 Harding St. — Power Plant Engineer 
Ernest B. Hinsman, Jr., 29 Cross St. — Laboratory Foreman 
Clara J. Hoell, 399 Main St. — Housewife 
Eugene G. Hoell, 399 Main St. — Security Officer 
William E. Horan, 41 Nebo St. — Electrician 
Richard S. Horton, 1 Curve St. — Painting Foreman 
Eric A. Iafolla, 35 Brook St. — Journeyman Cable Splicer 
Lucy Jackson, 19 Lowell Mason Rd. — School Bus Driver 
Richard J. Janssen, 20 Arnold Dr. — District Sales Manager 
Edward P. Jenkins, 87 Adams St. — Insurance Broker 
Herbert E. Johnson, 26 Pine St. — Real Estate Salesman 
Robert Keers, 119 Harding St. — Retired 
William C. Kneer, 35 Ledgetree Rd. — Sales Representative 
Mary F. Knehr, Claypit Rd. — Billing Clerk-Typist 
Edward J. Kornasky, 7 Kenney Rd. — Golf Professional 
Mary C. Lannon, 93 North St. — Secretary- 
Joseph R. Lanseigne, 135 Harding St. — Maintenance Foreman 
Ivan Little, 63 South St. — Machinist 
Ruth K. McClinton, 10 Fox Lane — Housewife 
Charles D. McHale, 58 Blacksmith Dr. — Sales Manager 
Roy A. McQuillan, 14 Miller St. — Project Engineer 
Carl J. Mellea, 28 Hillcrest — Project Manager 
Melville V. Mills, 3 Bartlett Ave. — Appraiser 



89 



Stanley F. Minnaert, 3 Castle Ave. Ass't. Manager 
Donald T. Munsey, Jr.. 8 Clark Rd. — Research Microbiologist 

Ed* aid 1 ). Murphy, 10 Gun Hill Rd. — Vice President 

P 
David J. Xoonan. 7 Castle Ave. — Mechanic 

Paul E. Nyren, 7 Johns Ave. — Ass't. Supervisor of Engineering 

Josephine Palumbo, 57 Frairy St. — Housewife 

Rebel Palumbo, 57 Frairy St. — Retired 

George M. Patterson, 4 Cedar Lane — Manager-Personnel 

Henry Plimpton, 6 Linden Ct. — Machine Shop Foreman 

Ralph F. Poli, 35 Frairy St. — Branch Manager 

Mary H. Pope, 26 Hillcrest Rd. — Housewife 

Howard A. Powers, 22 Philip St. — Engineer 

Theresa G. Procaccini, 54 Frairy St. — Housewife 

Walter F. Reynolds, Sr., 4 Curve St. — Retired 

Elva M. Ricker, 52 Adams St. — Housewife 

Andrew E. Ritchie, Jr., 22 High St. — Product Manager 

Walter E. Rohnstock, 19 Forest St. — Shipper-Checker 

Guy B. Savage, Jr., 16 Elm St. — Truck Driver 

Guy B. Savage, Sr., 50 Adams St. — Retired 

Edward V. Sinatra, Jr., 78 Granite St. — Manager 

Burgess P. Standley, 75 Elm St. — Self-employed 

Stanley W. Swain, 66 Foundry St. — Insurance Broker, Self-employed 

Richard P. Thompson, 18 Orchard St. — Salesman 

William Tighe, 6 Johns Ave. — Lineman 

William R. Tothill, 24 Green St. — Insurance Sales 

Albert T. Tray, 7 Maplewood Rd. — Planning Engineer-Communications 

Robert W. Van Ness, 61 Colonial Rd. — Director-Personnel 

Alfred Vasaturo, 4 Lowell Mason Rd. — Mail Carrier 

Ray W. Warburton, 12 Nebo St. — Design Engineer 

John C. Willis, 14 Hearthstone Dr. — Manager 

Annie M. Wills, 358 Main St. — Retired 

Edith E. Wills, 358 Main St. — Retired 

90 



REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Dog Officer for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1972: 

During the year received 87 complaints which were investigated and/ 
or resolved. 



Dogs returned to owners 
Dogs killed by automobiles 
Dogs picked up by dog officer 
Dogs returned to other towns 
Dogs registered 1972 
Kennels registered 1972 
Dogs restrained by Dog Officer 



32 

4 
51 

3 

1162 

22 

11 



Respectfully submitted, 
HOWARD L. KILMER 
Dog Officer 



REPORT OF THE ANIMAL INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Following is my report as Animal Inspector for the year ending 
December 31, 1972. 

Forty-four (44) dogs alleged to have bitten, or scratched people 
were quarantined for a period of ten (10) days. When these animals 
were checked at the end of the quarantine period, none of them showed 
any evidence of rabies. 

One dog and one cat were sent to the Wasserman Laboratory for 
a rabies check. Neither one showed positive for rabies. 



91 



Twenty-nine (29) stables used as shelters for horses, sheep, goats, 
beef cattle, or swine were examined for general cleanliness, water 
supply, sufficient light, and conformation to Board of Health Rules and 
Regulations. 

For the annual inspection a total of 73 horses, 20 ponies, 16 beef 
cattle. 41 sheep, 3 goats, 3 swincs, and 1 donkey were inspected for and 
appeared to be free of any communicable diseases. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD A. ELLSWORTH, JR. 
Animal Inspector 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of the Town of Medfield 

The following is my annual report for the year ending December 
31, 1972. 

I have issued a total of 226 Building Permits (1971-216) as listed 
below, and have made a total of 863 inspections together with Rebel 
Palumbo, Assistant Inspector, as against 796 inspections made in 1971. 

The following is a breakdown of permits issued: 

r 

New Single family dwellings 56 

Additions from Single to two-family dwellings 3 

Additions to private dwellings 56 

Renovations to private dwellings 17 

New construction-Industrial 2 

New Gasoline Station 1 

Town Garage 1 

Addition to Industrial Building 1 

Renovation to Industrial Building 1 

Additions to Business Buildings 2 

Renovations to Business Buildings 2 

92 



Renovations to Gasoline Station 1 

Private Swimming Pools 27 

Private Horse Stables 1 
Reshingling roofs and installation of new side walls 44 

Demolitions 3 

Relocation of one family dwellings 2 

Foundation for relocated dwelling 1 

Relocation of one-car garage 1 

Foundation for relocated garage 1 

Temporary Trailer office (Jaycees) 1 

Private Tennis Courts 2 



TOTAL PERMITS 226 

Total Income from Building Permit fees $ 3,184.50 

(1971 — $2,649.00) 

Estimated Construction Costs on New Dwellings $1,554,000.00 

(1971 — $1,426,000.00) 

Estimated Construction Costs Renovations, 

additions, pools, shingling & sidewalls $ 357,000.00 

(1971 — $221,600.00) 

New Construction on Industrial/Business $ 426,000.00 

(1971 — $27,500.00) 

The courses conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Com- 
munity Affairs at Bentley College in Waltham and at Holy Cross College 
in Worcester for Building Inspectors of all towns and cities of the State 
have been attended by both Mr. Palumbo and myself. The BOCA Building 
Code has been approved by the Massachusetts legislature and attendance 
at these courses is the first requisite for inspectors to be qualified and 
certified as Building Inspectors. 

I wish to thank the Town officials, Mr. Fred Conley, the Executive 
Secretary, the other department inspectors, the administrative secretaries 
in the Town Hall, and Mrs. Kathleen C. Conners for the assistance and 
cooperation they have rendered me during the past year. 

The local and out-of-town builders and contractors continue to be 
very cooperative in the performance of their work with the Town in 
abiding by the Town of Medfield Building Code. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT B. BURR 
Building Inspector 



93 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of the Town of Medfield 

The Building Code Committee held meetings this year as problems 
were brought to the attention of the Committee by the Building Inspec- 
tor. All such problems have been settled in an opinion. 

The Committee deems it advisable not to work on any further 
amendments to the Medfield Building Code untli the Legislation recently 
passed by the Commonwealth is resolved that all towns and cities adopt 
the BOCA Basic Building Code. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NICHOLAS LAVERGHETTA, Chairman 
JOSEPH T. CUNNING, Vice-Chairman 
FRANCIS J. MASTROPIERI 
JOSEPH RYAN, Chief of Fire Dept. 
HERBERT B. BURR, Clerk 
JAMES BROCK, Associate Member 

Medfield Building Code Committee 



REPORT OF THE GAS INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Gas fitting for the year 
ending December 31, 1972. 

Number of permits issued 122 

Total fees collected $866.00 

Inspections by Gas Inspector 148 

Inspections by Acting Gas Inspector 18 

Total monies expended $1,051.00 

I wish to thank the Town Officials, the Secretaries at the Town 
Hall, and the other Inspectors for their help and cooperation during 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER R. NYE 
Inspector of Gasfitting 



94 



REPORT OF THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Gentlemen: 

I hereby submit my report as Plumbing Inspector for the period be- 
ginning January 1, 1972 through June 30, 1972. 

Number of Permits Issued 56 

Number of Inspections 142 

Permit Fees $1,077.00 

I wish to thank the Town Officials, Secretaries at the Town House, 
and other Inspectors for their cooperation and assistance during the past 
years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. ROGER PETRIE 
Plumbing Inspector 



REPORT OF THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

For the half year, July 1, 1972 to December 31, 1972: 

Plumbing Permits Issued 47 

Plumbing Inspections made 119 

Amount turned over to Treasurer $587.00 

Permits Inspected, July 1, to September, by Acting Inspector Walter 
Nye, Sr., 55. 

Permits Inspected September, to December 31, by Plumbing In- 
spector George Nye, 64. 

I wish to thank Marie Burke and the office personnel for their help 
since my appointment. 

GEORGE E. NYE 



95 



REPORT OF THE WIRING INSPECTOR 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I hereby submit my report as Inspector of Wires for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1972. 

Permits Issued 215 

Inspections Made 318 

Income from Wiring Permits $1,842.00 

Department Expenses $2,060.00 

At this time I would like to thank the administrative secretaries and 
the other inspectors for their help and cooperation during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH F. ERSKINE, JR. 
Inspector of Wiring 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Following is my annual report for the year ending December 31, 
1972. 

Sealed 

Scales 

Over 10,000 lbs. 

5,000 to 10,000 lbs. 

100 to 5,000 lbs. 8 

Under 100 lbs. 20 

Weights 

Avoirdupois 45 

Apothecary 39 

Liquid Measure 

One Gallon or less 

Automatic Measures 

Gas Pumps 50 

Grease Pumps 3 

Yard Sticks 5 

Tapes 



Total 170 



96 



Trial weighing of commodities 120 

Expenses: 

Salary $165.00 

Telephone & Transportation 60.00 

Bond 10.00 

Supplies 21.82 



Total S256.82 
Receipts 

Sealing Fees $190.90 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD A. ELLSWORTH 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 



97 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
REPORTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1972 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The reports following, detail the progress of your school system over 
the past year. 

1972 was marked by the retirement of Thomas A. Blake as superin- 
tendent. Mr. Blake has earned our gratitude by serving us ably for fifteen 
years. After exhaustive investigation on the part of the Superintendent 
Selection Committee, comprised of faculty and citizens, we were most 
pleased to welcome, in August, Dr. Bruce Pulsifer, as our new superin- 
tendent. 

Our school population showed a net increase of 67 students as of 
October, 1972. As in the past few years, the trend of a leveling off at 
some of our elementary schools has continued, and the increase con- 
tinues to be at the upper levels. The introduction of kindergartens in 

1973, as mandated by the State, will, of course, increase the elementary 
school population. The addition of teaching personnel is necessary in 
areas of increasing population. At the same time, the administration is 
making corresponding reductions where the enrollment decreases. 

For budgeting purpcses we are moving to a fiscal year comparable 
to that of the State, rather than our present calendar year. Thus, our 
budget is an 18 month one, running from January 1, 1973 to June 30, 

1974. A 509c increase, therefore, is built into this budget due to the addi- 
tional six months. Included also are teaching salaries for July and August 
of 1974, as recommended by the State and the cost of adding kinder- 
gartens. 

The format of the budget as presented to the School Committee and 
Warrant Committee this year was far more detailed, permitting us to 
develop better controls of our expenditures. This is a preliminary step 
towards a possible program management system which would ultimately 
give us the greatest accountability. 

An increasing emphasis is being placed on evaluation of our system, 
as regards both educational quality and use of space. Inservice days en- 
able our staff to develop objectives and define ways of measuring them. 
Our Goals Committee has been evaluating our system in terms of State 
Department of Education goals and will continue to work with us in 
implementing these goals. The Space Needs Committee is working on 
up-dating population projections, proper utilization of existing space, and 
exploring alternatives to building. Both the above groups are composed 
of hard-working citizens who are providing invaluable research and 
ideas to the School Committee. 



101 



In addition, the Kindergarten Committee includes active towns- 
people who have spent many hours In developing what we hope will be 
an outstanding kindergarten program. We are also fortunate in having 
many parents volunteering (AVIS) in our libraries, as clerical aides, 
and in various other capacities. To all of the above, the School Commit- 
tee expresses its deep appreciation. Their efforts play a great part in 
the improvement of our school system. 

DAWN I. AUSTIN, Chairman 
GORDON W. THOMAS, Vice-Chairman 
PHILIP J. BURR, Secretary 
SON J A J. SIDERS, Financial Secretary 
JAMES D. SULLIVAN, M.D. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Chairwoman and Members of the School Committee : 

I am pleased to submit my first annual report which is the twenty- 
first in a series of annual reports of the Superintendents of Schools in 
Medfield. 



102 



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112 



Health 



Stagg, A. Ritchie, M.D. 
Harding, Madeleine, R.N. (Mrs.) 
Kashalena, Nancy C, R.N. (Mrs.) 
Ribak, Sidney I. 



School Physician 

School Nurse 

School Nurse 

Psychologist 



School Lunch Director 

Avery, Dorothy (Mrs.) 

Custodians 



Pritoni, Harold F. 
Boudreau, Joseph I. 
Boudreau, William F. 
Bridges, Frank W. 
Capocci, William L. 
Chevarie, Paul F. 
DiNardo, John 
Giard, Arnold U. 
Grover, John T. 
Hallowell, Vincent D. 
Iafolla, Ercole 
Kilmer, Howard L. 
LaPlante, Thomas M. 
Lori, John 

McCormack, John D. 
Motes, Carlis E. 
Suereth, Eric T. 
Sweet, Arthur L. 
Sweet, Reginald 
Timmerman, Joseph W. 



Second Term: 
Third Term: 
Fourth Term: 
First Term: 



Head Custodian 

Groundskeeper 

Elm Street 

Dale Street 

Junior High/Memorial 

Dale Street 

Groundskeeper 

Junior High 

Maintenance 

Elm Street 

Memorial 

High School 

Junior High 

Maintenance 

Memorial 

Dale Street 

Elm Street 

High School 

Junior High 

High School 



School Calendar 



January 2 through February 16 

February 26 through April 13 

April 23 through June 22 

September 6 through December 21 



No-School Signal 



Junior and Senior High Schools — Fire Alarm at 6:45 A.M. 

Elementary Schools — Fire Alarm at 7:00 AM. 

Also radio broadcasts on stations WBZ, WHDH, WKOX. 



113 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



New Personnel 



Appointment Effective 



ADMINISTRATION 



Bruce C. Pulsifer, Ed.D., Superintendent of Schools 
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



July 



Jewel Knovvles, French 

Morris Simson Chemistry/ Biology 



September 
September 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Donna Atwood, Mathematics 
Ralph LeClere, Industrial Arts 
Beverly Haigh, Secretary 



September 
September 
September 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



Peter A. Bradley, Social Studies 

Patricia A. McGill, English 

Arlene Mollo, Art 

Daniel S. Rose, English/Social Studies 



September 
November 
September 
September 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



Maura M. Burke, Art 
Marilyn Juda, Grade 3 



September 
September 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Nancy Featherman, Grade 2 
Catherine Hinkley, Special Education 
Sarah Gaffney, Math/Science 
Laura Saunders, Science 
Marilyn A. Schofield, Grade 2 
Polly S. Selkoe, Reading 
Theresa Shay, Grade 1 
Jessica Werner, Art 

SPEECH THERAPY 

Jonathan Schwamm, Elementary schools 



September 
September 
September 
October 
November 
September 
September 
September 



March 



114 



GUIDANCE 
Carol S. Baine, Senior High 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE 



September 



Roseanne Gross 
Sandra Mitchell 
Diane Jackson 
Janet Hurley 



September 

December 

April 

September, 1971 



TERMINATIONS 

ADMINISTRATION 
Thomas A. Blake, Superintendent of Schools 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



August 



Jean L. MacDonald 
David Porter 
Claire W. Reed 



June 
April 
June 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



David M. Mead 
Henry A. Mangili 



June 
June 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



Nina M. Dow 
Sandra Goltz 



August 
November 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



Katherine Farley 
Mary Lahnston 
Ann E. Vogel 



June 
April 
June 



WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Helene Choby 
Judith Close 
Dorothy M. Coombs 
Nancy P. Edwards 
Sarah S. Gaffney 



June 
June 
June 
June 
November 



115 



G. Evelyn Keneflck October 

Jennifer Lucas June 

GUIDANCE 

Lois J. Marshak June 

SPEECH 

Gerrianne Goldstein February 



Enrollment Commentary 

As of October 1, 1972, a gain of 54 students was noted over the en- 
rollment figure of October 1, 1971 — a percentage increase of 1.98%. 

A reveiw of recent enrollment projections is currently being under- 
taken as part of the School Committee appointed Space Needs Commit- 
tee work. Indications point to a lowering of projected enrollment com- 
pared with recent reports and based upon inclusion of the most recent 
enrollment and population figures in Medfield. If these newer projections 
accurately portray the future, w T e will experience pupil increases through 
1976 followed by a period of stabilization. Any building boom in town 
would inflate these projected figures which are based in part upon our 
current housing start level of 60 per year. 

Implications for new school building or additions are also being care- 
fully studied by the citizens serving on the Space Needs Committee. The 
School Committee and administration look forward to the Space Needs 
report in late winter or early spring. Until such time, school officials are 
holding in abeyance any planning for new construction. 

Student increases are anticipated for the fall of 1973. Approximately 
195 kindergarten children will be attending half day sessions as this new 
and welcome addition to the school program is initiated. Another in- 
crease of about the same amount as this year is expected across grades 
1-12. All the 1973 anticipated increases can be absorbed into our present 
facilities with careful scheduling of staff and students. 



FEDERAL FUNDS 

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, Public Law 
89-10, Title I funded $18,350 to "Project ADVANCE", a summer school 
program held at the Junior High School involving children from Memorial 
and Dale Street Schools. The growing Federal emphasis in these pro- 

116 



grams is to provide relatively large sums of money for relatively few 
children in order to make significant educational gains for those in need 
— especially at the pre-school and primary grade levels. For this reason 
many of our students cannot be served by this particular program. Last 
summer the Wheelock School attendance area was ruled ineligible to 
participate in the program. Similar restrictions may be enforced next year 
as well. 

The National Defense Education Act, Public Law 85-864, Public Law 
89-10, Title II funded $4,135 for library materials. 

The Vocational Education Amendments of 1968, Public Law 90-576 
funded $16,312 to assist in the continuance of the Occupational Educa- 
tion Program. Funds from this source were not available beginning with 
the school year 1972-1973. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

In August, Superintendent Thomas A. Blake concluded 15 years in 
the position — marked by the occasion of his well deserved and well noted 
retirement. Under Mr. Blake the school system grew to include the 
Medfield High School, the Medfield Junior High School and the Ralph 
Wheelock Elementary School. The solid school programs and fine quality 
of professional and non-certificated personnel which he has assembled are 
fitting tributes to his professional and good-natured leadership. I am 
personally indebted to Tom for the smooth and helpful transition in office 
which he effected with me this summer — and for his willingness to share 
from his store of experience and knowledge when called upon since then. 
Best wishes and "visit us often" exclamations are extended to Tom and 
his wife, Rita, for the years ahead. 

We in the schools are grateful to the Town officials and their staffs, 
the Departments of Police, Fire, Highway, Trees and Water for continued 
and able assistance in school business. 

I am impressed and pleased by the obvious interest in and support 
of our students practiced by health and cafeteria staffs, custodians, secre- 
taries, teachers, counselors, supervisors and administrators. The office 
staff — Virginia Kerr, Mary Shugrue, Ruth McCarthy, and May Alex- 
ander — have all been most helpful to me and the school system during 
the past few months. Special notice is made of the invaluable assistance 
and support regularly provided to me by James H. Morris, Assistant 
Superintendent. 

Many citizens have actively participated in studying aspects of the 
schools and promoting quality education, and others have helped ably 
through their valuable volunteer and substitute work. Chairman Frank 



117 



Angelis, Leo McCabc, and Russ Devereau of the Space Needs, Goals 
and Kindergarten committees, respectively, have given much time, 
energy, and wisdom to those most crucial areas of study and deserve the 
thanks of the entire community. 

Finally, the members of the School Committee and School Planning 
and Building Committee have provided yeoman service during 1972 to 
further good education for Mcdfield's boys and girls. I am pleased to be 
able to work with all of these fine people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BRUCE C. PULSIFER 
Superintendent of Schools 



ENROLLMENT BY GRADE — OCTOBER 1, 1972 

SPED 123456789 10 11 12 Total 

Boys 9 113 140 116 123 115 120 128 139 118 110 105 95 1431 
Girls 3 108 100 108 123 134 117 123 109 117 122 98 88 1350 
Totals 12 221 240 224 246 249 237 251 248 235 232 203 183 2781 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

With pleasure I submit my second Annual Report as Principal of 
Memorial School. The year ending December 31, 1972 has witnessed 
some changes in personnel, enrollment, and programs which are notable. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

Enrollment on opening day, September 7, 1972, was 399 children, de- 
crease of 10 pupils from the close of school in June. The appreciable differ- 
ence in enrollment was most significant in grade one where one First 
Grade classroom has been eliminated from the school organization. Cur- 
rently the building is staffed with seventeen classroom teachers and 
seven special area personnel on either a shared or full-time basis. New 
teachers filled the positions of one third grade classroom, Art specialist, 
I.M.C. Media specialist, and Speech and Hearing specialist. Our present 
overall teacher-pupil ration is 23.2 in the basic self-contained classrooms. 



118 



PROGRAM 

A significant change in the physical organization of Memorial School 
was conducted during the summer months to structure the school into 
three units, each of which contains classes from grades 1-3. Teachers 
are organized in teams of two to facilitate sharing of materials and 
ideas. With the implementation of Kindergarten in 1973, additional re- 
organization will be necessary. 

An Early Release Program welcomed first grade children to their 
first public school experience in September. For the first seven days of 
school the children were dismissed early and the afternoon sessions were 
used for parent orientation, conferences, screening evaluations, and 
teacher planning and preparation sessions. In a three-phased evaluation 
oF Early Release during the month of November, participating parents 
and teachers determined that the program had been highly successful and 
recommended its continuance. 

The addition of a full time Media Specialist in the I.M.C. has greatly 
increased the services offered. In addition to the open concept throughout 
the school day, children are now offered formalized book talks, audio- 
video presentations and library skills lessons on a scheduled basis. Again 
the outstanding participation of Volunteer Aides has benefited our I.M.C. 
and entire school, 



COMMUNITY-SCHOOL 

a. The traditional Open House was held earlier in the school year 
on September 21. Presentations by classroom teachers and the 
Principal outlined the school program and policies for parents. 

b. Evening Parent-Teacher Conferences were held on November 
15 and 21. Three hundred sixty-nine conferences were conducted 
during these evenings and provisions were made for many addi- 
tional follow-up meetings. 

c. During the past year several discussion nights have been held at 
the school. The opportunity to discuss any facet of the school's op- 
eration has been well received by many interested parents. 

d. Invitations to visit classrooms during American Education Week 
brought many parents to Memorial School to observe their chil- 
dren in the classroom situation. 

Sincere appreciation is extended to the staff of Memorial School, 
parents and volunteers, Superintendents, Assistant Superintendent, School 



119 



Committee and other school personnel for their cooperation and support 
throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUSSELL A. DEVEREAU 
Principal 

REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, I submit my tenth Annual 
Report for the year ending December 31, 1972. 

PROGRAM 

The school program of basic skill development was strengthened 
and improved by the introduction of new and/or different materials, 
teaching techniques and learning experiences. Of particular note are 
the following: 

1. Expansion of our guest speaker's program for appropriate 
classes and grades. 

2. Curriculum oriented field trips for the classes of Social Studies 
and Science. 

3. Introduction of mini-courses during achievement testing week. 

4. Acquisition of new equipment for the reading program, such as 
listening centers and recorded material. 

5. Introduction and use of Video-taping in the English program for 
creative arts projects. 

6. A day in the Spring for orientation and visitation for sixth 
graders at the Junior High School and for third graders at the 
Dale Street School. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 

r- 

Students in grades 4, 5, and 6 continue to exhibit enthusiastic partici- 
pation in the program of intramural activities. A full schedule of flag 
football, basketball, indoor hockey, volleyball, square dancing and gym- 
nastics enabled students to participate in a wide range of interesting 
events. 



120 



The chorus and band participated in a musical exchange program 
with the Millis Elementary School for the fourth year. 

A successful Open House was held in October with a large attendance 
of interested parents. Refreshments were served by members of Avis 
under the direction of Mrs. Ippoliti. 

I wish to thank the Superintendents, Assistant Superintendent, School 
Committee, the Faculty, and the citizens of Medfield for their cooperation 
and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALLAN K. BELCHER 
Principal 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

As Principal of the Ralph Wheelock School, it is a pleasure to submit 
my fourth annual report for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1972. 

Our total enrollment was 590 which represents a decrease of 5 stu- 
dents from last year. Average class size was 25 with 4 sections in each 
grade and a trainable class of 4 students. 

The school year commenced with the first grades engaging in the 
early release program, whereby they were dismissed before lunch on 
September 7, 8, 11, 12, and after lunch on September 13-15. This proce- 
dure met with great success, based on the observations of first grade 
teachers and the results of a parent questionnaire. The manner in which 
children adjusted to their new environment indicated that this program 
should be continued at the beginning of the next school year. 

Regularly scheduled conferences were held in grades 1-3 in Novem- 
ber. Both parents and teachers have found this means of exchanging in- 
formation exceedingly valuable. Attention will be focused on improving 
the scheduling and techniques of this reporting system. 

In grades 1-3, teachers are developing a more "open" approach to 
learning so that children will have an opportunity to be more creative 
and to select an area of interest. This organizational pattern develops in 
a very relaxed atmosphere which is conducive to the learning situation. 

121 



The elementary guidance program is developmental which stresses 
identification and prevention of academic, social and emotional difficul- 
ties. It also focuses on developing an understanding of self and others. 

"Project Help" is a new guidance program which is directed to help- 
ing children on particular skills. Volunteers work in conjunction with the 
classroom teachers, specialists, guidance counselor and administration to 
implement a program which is directly suited to the child's needs. This 
procedure is being piloted in grade 1. Its success will determine expansion 
of the project into other grade levels. At this writing, every first grade 
student who needs special attention is being instructed on an individual 
basis by the remedial reading teacher and by the volunteers. 

During the past year the Wheelwright Outdoor Classroom area has 
acquired a new look. Volunteers from the Boy Scouts and other interested 
townspeople have set up new teaching stations and improved existing 
path areas. Many classes from the Wheelock School have taken advantage 
of the proximity of this ecosystem . . . supplementing, especially, lessons 
in Social Studies, Math and Science. It is anticipated that the Outdoor 
Classroom area will be used extensively throughout the year in many 
areas of study. 

Children at the fourth grade level were scheduled daily for Reading 
and English during periods 1 and 2. This 'block of time gave the teachers 
more opportunities to correlate subject matter, to provide a wider scope 
of activities and to give individual attention. It also enabled the students 
to adjust more readily to departmentalization. 

During study periods mini-courses were initiated in sewing, needle- 
craft, and child care and development (babysitting) to fifth and sixth 
grade girls. Plans were being formulated to continue and extend the 
offerings for more students. 

The Instructional Materials Center (library) has been the center 
of activity. Students were utilizing more of the non-print media (film- 
strips, tapes, etc.) for their assignments and information. Teachers were 
becoming more familiar with the materials and sendees available as it 
relates to their course of study. Utilization of the entire facility has in- 
creased almost fifty percent over last year. Instruction in IMC use has 
been integrated with the classroom program. 

I wish to extend my gratitude to the Superintendents, Assistant 
Superintendent, School Committee, Coordinators and all school person- 
nel for their assistance. Appreciation is also extended to volunteers and 
parents for their support and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK J. HOFFMAN 
Principal 

122 



SCHOOL OFFICIALS POINT OUT POPULATION STATISTICS 
AT TOWN MEETING. 



Population 




Photo by Frank Simonetti, Jr. 

1. to r. Ralph Parmigiane, Chairman of School Planning & 
Building Committee and School Committee members 
Dawn Austin and Sonja Siders. 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

With pleasure I am submitting the annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1972. 

As of this writing, the student census is 738 distributed over three 
grades as follows: 251 at Grade 7; 246 at Grade 8; 233 at Grade 9; and 
8 Special Education students. 

During the past year, an ecology course was added to the Science 
curriculum at the 8th and 9th grade levels. Also introduced this Sep- 
tember was a Basic Life Science program in Grade 7 designed to meet 
the needs of students with learning difficulties. 



123 



The Social Science Department introduced two new programs at the 

7th and 8th grade levels, revised course descriptions, expanded the 
heterogeneous grouping program, and conducted several special activities 
during the year including an "Election '72" unit in which all students 
participated in the processes of poll taking, campaigns, registration and 

election. 

In the area of Mathematics, an Individualized Algebra program has 
been developed for implementation in 1973. Teacher-made materials have 
helped the Individualized Math program at each level to be expanded. 
The accelerated seventh and eighth grade classes were increased to two 
at each grade level in order to give more students the opportunity for 
advanced work. In addition, inventory tests have been developed and 
implemented by the department to help identify more accurately student 
achievement level and need. 

The English department has focused its attention in the following 
areas; continuing to update the curriculum, stressing continuity of skills 
and concepts at each grade level, establishing continuous evaluation of 
writing standards, and incorporating the use of multi-media as a supple- 
mentary learning process. 

The Thomas A. Blake Instructional Media Center continues to in- 
crease its service to the total school. All media is selected to supplement 
the curricula, thereby giving students the opportunity to use these mate- 
rials as further information sources in conjunction with their classroom 
activities. 

The I.M.C. book collection numbers over 5,300 volumes including 
several sets of encyclopediae, over 800 information file folders, over 550 
audio visuals in the forms of filmstrips, records, slides, and tapes. In ad- 
dition the I.M.C. has subscriptions to fifty student and professional 
journals. 

In June, the Student Council presented the I.M.C. with a Super 8mm 
camera, projector, and film editor for class-related film projects. 

With increased field trip activity this year, we are gratefully indebted 
to those volunteers, including members of A.V.I.S., who enabled us to 
provide richer educational opportunities for our student body. 

I thank the Superintendents, Assistant Superintendent, members of 
the School Committee, the faculty and school personnel for there assist- 
ance and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES W. O'CONNELL 
Principal 

124 



REPORT OF THE 
AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

The official enrollment for the high school this past fall was 618 stu- 
dents, an increase of sixty-eight students from the previous school year. 
There were 151 graduates in the Class of 1972, three of whom graduated 
at the end of their junior year and two of whom had met diploma require- 
ments at the conclusion of the first half-year of their senior year. 

Upon successful attainment of diploma requirements, 13 seniors plan 
to leave school at the end of January, 1973, and 16 juniors expect to grad- 
uate early, in June of 1973. 

The introduction of English electives to sophomores this year will en- 
able more students, if they and their parents feel they are ready, to 
graduate from high school earlier than the traditional four-year program 
normally permits. Through meeting local and State requirements such 
students have the opportunity to either enter areas of direct employment 
or to pursue further education beyond high school, sooner than otherwise 
might be expected. 

Fifty professional staff members serve the students of Medfield High 
School, either on a full-time or part-time basis. Of these, advanced de- 
grees are held by 62%. 

During this past year five students distinguished themselves by re- 
ceiving Honorable Mention as the result of their achievement in the 
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Quali- 
fying Test. 

An average of the last five-year statistics indicate that our graduates 
further their education or enter immediate training and employment as 
follows: Four-year colleges, 47%; Two-year colleges, 15%; Nursing 
schools, 2%; Non-college institutions, 12%; Military service, 3%; Em- 
ployment, 18%; and Other, 3%. 

We are pleased to have two foreign exchange students with us this 
year. Miss Myriam Munda, from Italy, is sponsored by the American 
Field Service, and Miss Ann Pollnow from Sweden, is sponsored by the 
Student International Service. 

We gratefully acknowledge all of the Medfield clubs and organiza- 
tions for their support in our local scholarship program. Also, we express 
our appreciation to the Medfied Boosters Club and the Medfield Music 
Boosters for their respective support of our school programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUSSELL H. JOHNSTON, JR. 
Principal 



125 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 

of 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1972 

Gymnasium 4:00 p.m. 

Sunday, June 4, 1972 

Program 

Processional CLASS OF 1972 

Pomp and Circumstance Elgar 

MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL BAND 

Douglas W. Godfrey, Director 

MARSHALS 

GREGORY J. ELLEN A GLENN D. STOKES 

Invocation The REVEREND LAWRENCE M. RYAN 

Welcome 

ROBERT JAMES LARKIN, JR., President, Class of 1972 
Honor Essays 

KAREN RUTH FINN STEPHEN JAMES HUGHES 

Glee Club 

No Man is an Island Whitney and Kramer 

Presentation of Student Council Scholastic Award 

SCOTT FREDRIC CAMPBELL, President, Student Council 
Presentation of American Field Service Student 

HARRY A. KELLEHER, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
Presentation of Awards 

RUSSELL H. JOHNSTON, JR., Principal 



126 



Presentation of Scholarships 



MRS. DAVID L. WILMARTH, President, Hannah Adams Club 

ROBERT W. FELTMATE, President, Medfield Lions Club 

MR. HENRY G. BO WEN, Medfield Jaycees 

JOSEPH F. McHUGH, President, Medfield Teachers Association 

MR. STEPHEN KRISTOF, V.F.W. Auxiliary, Post 6644 

MR. GEORGE W. HINKLEY, A.L. Auxiliary, Beckwith Post No. 110 

MRS. ARTHUR G. MAGUIRE, 

Medfield Youth Center Adult Advisory Board 
GLENN D. STOKES, President, Medfield Youth Center 
EDWARD W. CALLOW, Commander, A.L. Beckwith Post No. 110 

Presentation of American Legion Medals 

MR. LEO G. SHIELS, A.L. Beckwith Post No. 110 

Glee Club 



You'll Never Walk Alone 
Presentation of Diplomas 



Rogers and Hammerstein 



MRS. CHARLES A. AUSTIN, 3rd, Chairman, Medfield School Committee 

THOMAS A. BLAKE, Superintendent of Schools 

RUSSELL H. JOHNSTON, JR., Principal 



Benediction 
Recessional 

Consecration of the House 



The REVEREND DONALD G. MISENER 



Beethoven 



Class of 1972 



John Michael Anes 
Wayne Joseph Arsenault 
Darini Shereen Arulpragasm 
Laura Jean Arzberger 
; Susan Louise Avery 
Steven IMichael Berry 
Barbara J. Block 
'Donald Ernest Booth 
Linda Ann Bravo 
: Shaun Ann Brayton 
'Paul Kenneth Bready, Jr. 
Stephen M. Brewer 
Wayne Carter Brewster 
Carol Elisane Bryan 
Sandra Lee Buchanan 
Brian David Buckley 
Dennis Paul Budwey 



* Elizabeth Susan Gilmore 
Melanie Jean Gorman 
David Elwyn Gottberg 
Robert Richard Grover 
Elaine Claire Guenette 
Paula Jean Guerra 
Ronald Eric Gustavson 
John James Hanley 
Thomas Donald Hansen 
John Gregory Harding 

* Robert James Harner 

* Bruce Harris 

* Susan Mary Hay 
Russell Allen Herman 
Walter James Hersee 
Gary Clyde Hobel 
Bente Hoist 



127 



Susan Gay Burry 
Donald L. Bush 

Linda Marie Calo 
Christine Ellen Campbell 
Laurie Green Campbell 
Scott Fredric Campbell 
Michael James Cellucci 
Suzanne Jane Champagne 
Anthony Paul Cioto 
Debra Ann Cook 
Elaine Marie Crump 
Karen Ann Crump 
Aldo D. D'Angelo 
Stephen George Danyla 
Diane Lynn Davis 
Steven Edford Demers 
Kimberly Anne Dick 
John Ralph DiGiacomo 
Deirdre Ann Doherty 
-"Christl Gertrude 
Romana Duernberger 
Jeffrey Francis Ellena 
Robin Denise Erichsen 
Karen Ruth Finn 
Dennis Morgan Flaherty 
Laura J. Forsythe 
Dana Paul Friend 
J. Jeffrey Gablehart, Jr. 
Roberta Lynn Gannon 
* Barbara Jane Geller 
John F. Gilbert 
Timothy Zane McFadden 
William George McKnight 
Susan Dorothy Meader 
Kim Kathleen Meagher 
Robert Edward Meaney, Jr. 
Brian Carl Mellea 
■Lionel Albert Menard 
Todd Whitney Milligan 
Brenda Lee Miner 
Cynthia Kay Morse 
Cathleen Ann Munger 
Constance Elizabeth Nash 
Martha Ann Norlie 
Gail Marie Nyren 
Susan G. O'Brien 
: James Michael O'Malley 
Donna Marie O'Neill 
Suzanne Perry Osmer 



i -una hi AlbinHoyt 

Lloyd David Hughes 
^Stephen James Hughes 

Georgia Ann Hultz 
:: Joy Ann Iafolla 
:: Teresa Louise Ingles 

David Richard Iverson, Jr. 
"Barbara Lynn Kaerwer 

Lillian Cecilia Kalweit 

Mary Patricia Kane 
"Martha Anne Kenney 

Brenda Jane Keris 

* Janis Prescott Kibbe 
Joyce Katherine Kilmer 
William Albert Kingsbury 
Evelyn Kohn 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 
Robert James Larkin, Jr. 
:: Deborah Stone Lea veil 
Deirdre Lennon 

* Nancy Jill Lingel 
Jeanne Susan Lovelace 
Peter Joseph Maggioni 
Lynn Ann Maguire 
Jeanne Marie Maliff 
Brian Albert Manganello 
Peter Francis Martino 
Scott Richard Mathewson 
Julie Ann Mayfield 

* Dorothea Mary McCarthy 
Suzanne Marie McCarthy 
Carolyn Temple Robie 
Donald Rogers 

Diane Jean Sander 
Barbara Blake Sanford 

:|: Linda Elizabeth Sargent 
Edmund Joseph Sarno 
Stephen Guy Savage 
Linda Ann Sergi 
Susan Jean Smith 
Sandra Ivon Stewart 
Wayne Robert Stokes 

:: Robin Louise Stuart 
Philip Willson Sugg III 
Arthur Whitney Swanson 
Margaret Sargent Swanson 
Sharon Elaine Swanson 

1 Horace M. Thayer, Jr. 
Eileen Patricia Timmerman 



128 



Richard Palumbo Karen Ann Tortorici 

Karie Kathleen Patterson Teri Lynn Toubeau 

Beverly Jeanne Peebles Jill Marie Vollmuth 

Mary Winthrop Perry Laura Wallingford 

Catherine Ann Pilipski Cynthia Ann Watson 

Deborah Jean Poor Nancy Ann Wicker 

Steven Elward 'Raffin Laura Ruth Willman 

Lynn Randolph * David Douglas Wilmarth 

Daniel James Reed * Patricia Lynn York 

Janette Helen Reynolds Michael William Zemina 

* Honor Society Members 

t American Field Service Student 



Ml 



REPORT OF GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Guidance Director of the Medfield Public Schools, I am pleased 
to submit my ninth annual report. This encompasses the period from 
January 1 1972 to December 31, 1972. 

At the elementary levels, time has been spent by the counselors in 
the identification and prevention of concerns common to children at this 
level. Emphasis is also directed towards the human development program 
that helps children to learn about themselves and others through the 
mediums of group dynamics, role playing, classroom observations and in- 
dividual counseling. Consultations are held with concerned individuals 
such as teachers, parents, and outside referral agencies. 

Programs such as Project Help have been initiated. This is a tutorial 
program for youngsters that need additional academic assistance utilizing 
parents from the community on a volunteer basis. 

At the junior high level the counselors subdivide the 7th, 8th and 
9th graders, making it possible for students to be followed through 
three years by the same counselors. The orientation is the same as at the 
elementary level but there is more emphasis in the decision-making 
regarding course selection and placement in appropriate classes. 

The counselors have been instrumental in helping construct a master 
schedule for classes but it is earnestly hoped that through the medium 
of computerized processing this role will be minimized as it removes 
the counselors from their basic assignment of supportive and adjustive 



129 



counseling. Referral agencies such as the Needham Family Service, the 
area Mental Health Clinic, the town pastoral counseling services, and 
our own Tri-Valley Special Education Program have extended their func- 
tions this past year. 

At the high school level, a greater proportion of students are apply- 
ing to our state-supported colleges and these institutions are becoming 
more receptive to this demonstrated need by expanding their programs. 
More emphasis is now being given in guidance to career education and 
developing in teachers awareness of how their course content relates to 
the eventual work goals of their students. 

Of paramount concern, substantiated toy our pre-school screening 
results, is the child identified as presenting a learning disability. Actually 
this pattern has been found to exist at all grade levels. Therefore, we 
are strongly recommending the addition of learning disability specialists 
to assist in diagnostic and remedial procedures on the behalf of these 
children. 

With a larger school system servicing an increasing number of stu- 
dents, we are becoming more discreet and perceptive in meeting the 
concerns of our student clientele as outlined in the substance of this re- 
port. However, the need for a coordinated system of services comprising 
guidance, learning disabilities, and speech and hearing specialists to help 
each pupil to develop his potential and maintain his individuality is a 
practical necessity. 

Our thanks to all who have contributed in so many supportive ways 
to the functioning of pupil services in the Medfield Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALAN E. HASTINGS 
Guidance Director 



130 



REPORT OF OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

It is my pleasure to submit the third annual report on Occupational 
Education. 

Participation in courses in Business Education, Industrial Arts, and 
Home Economics have remained constant as compared to the previous 
year. Although enrollments in the High School Business Education pro- 
gram are less than in 1971, the Junior High typewriting program has 
shown substantial increase offsetting this decrease. 

Enrollments in the Art program reflect the interest of the student 
body in the Crafts area. Establishment of the additional facilities incor- 
porated into the revised High School plan should cause marked growth 
in this area. 

The Work Study and Teacher Aide programs, under which students 
are released from the High School to work in part-time employment or 
assist our teachers in the Elementary and Secondary schools has in- 
creased considerably, with enthusiastic response from employers, teach- 
ers, and students. 

Curriculum, definition and devolpment by members of each De- 
partment during the In-Service program have reaffirmed the need for 
expanded facilities and programs incorporated in the revised High School 
plan presented to the Town for approval. Efforts to attract students with 
career Education programs aimed at entry-level job skills are not and 
will not be totally effective until such time as suggested facilties become 
a reality. 

I wish to thank the Superintendents, Assistant Sueprintendent, 
School Committee, and all school personnel for their assistance and 
cooperation during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. RENNICK, JR. 
Director 



131 



REPORT OF ADULT EDUCATION 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 4, 1972 was the beginning of the second semester of the 
1971-1972 Adult Education Program. A total of 23 classes in eighteen 
different courses was continued by the Director. The courses continued 
were, Flower Arrangement, Clothing I and II, Tailoring, Typing, Painting 
I and II, Woodworking, Gym for Men, Gym for Women, Tennis, Con- 
versational Spanish, Intermediate Spanish, Amateur Photography, Yoga 
I and II, Bridge and Drivers Education. Courses discontinued for lack of 
enrollment were Slipcovering, Securities, Knitting, Great Decisions-'71 
and a course on Drugs. All courses were offered on either Tuesday, 
Wednesday or Thursday evenings between 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. for the 
second semester. 

The 1972-1973 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of 
24 different courses, 19 of these classes were established with a double 
offering in Woodworking, Tennis and Driver Education. Two of the new 
courses offered were Cake Decorating and Advanced Flower Arrange- 
ment. 

Three-hundred and ninety-seven people registered for the above 
courses in September of 1972. Eighty additional students were also en- 
rolled in the Driver Education Program in January of 1972. 

Driver Education is the most popular of all courses with an en- 
rollment of 105 students this past September. Classes were offered on 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday mornings for 12 weeks. The State 
Aided courses still proved to be more popular than the tuition courses. 

This year we requested and received State Funds to support the 
Adult Education Program. The School Committee has approved a tuition 
increase from $10.00 to $12.00 per course beginning in September 1973. 

Achievement Night for the 1972-1973 Adult Education Program will 
be held on March 21, 1973. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN CUOCO 

Director of Adult Education 






132 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF ATHLETiCS 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

I respectfully submit my second report as the Director of Athletics 
for the year ending December 31, 1972. The junior high and senior high 
athletic program herein reported is considered as an integral part of the 
curriculum. 

Interscholastic teams were fielded in three boys sports at the junior 
high school. Basketball and baseball teams were organized for seventh, 
eighth, and ninth graders. Special permission was granted for eighth 
grade boys to play on the freshman football team. Following is listed 
the coaching staff at the junior high : 

Basketball — Seventh & Eighth graders — Mr. Robert Hunter. 
Baseball — Seventh & Eighth graders — Mr. Stuart Maynard. 
Basketball — Freshman — Mr. Gordon Hodne. 
Baseball — Freshman — Mr. James Georgian. 
Football — Freshman — Mr. George Ruggiero. 
Football — Freshman — Mr. William Toof (Assistant) . 

Interscholastic teams at the high school were fielded for boys in 
football, basketball, baseball, cross-country, tennis, outdoor track, and 
indoor track. Girls teams competed in basketball, softball, field hockey, 
and cheerleading. Following is listed the coaching staff at the senior high 
school: 

Basketball (Varsity) — Mr. George Ruggiero — head coach. 

BasketbaU (J.V.) —Mr. David Gibbs. 

Baseball (Varsity) — Mr. Gordon Hodne — head coach. 

Baseball (J.V.) — Mr. Gary Stockbridge. 

Tennis — Mr. Robert Hunter. 

Outdoor Track — Mr. Robert Belmont. 

Cross-country — Mr. Robert Belmont. 

Indoor track — Mr. Gary Youlden. 

Football (Varsity) — Mr. William Young — head coach. 

Mr. Gary Youlden — assistant. 
Football (J.V.) — Mr. David Gibbs. 
Softball — Miss Karen Klosowski. 
Basketball — Miss Karen Klosowski. 
Field hockey — Mrs. Nancy Kelley — head coach. 

Mrs. Roseann Dugger — assistant. 
Cheerleading I & II — Miss Linda Grady. 

All teams competed in the Tri- Valley League, except the indoor 
track team, which competed in the Massachusetts Suburban Indoor 
Track League. Boys golf was played under Tri-Valley auspices as an 

133 



unofficial sport with Dr. James Sproul as mentor on a volunteer basis. 
Girls tennis also was played as an unofficial sport with Miss Susan Carney 
as a volunteer coach. Honors went to the Big Blue Basketball Team as 
Tri-Valley Division I champions. The girls basketball team won first 
place in the Southbridge Invitational Tournament. All teams were suc- 
cessful in imparting good sportsmanship, teamwork, and school spirit. 

At the annual sports award assembly, every boy and girl who parti- 
cipated in athletic is during the school year, received a letter, a certificate, 
or a sweater. Trophies were given to the most valuable players. The 
Edward Keyes School Spirit Award, which is a plaque, and a $300.00 
prize given by the Medfield School Boosters, was presented to Jeffrey 
Gabelhart. The Scholar Athlete Award for boys was awarded to Steve 
Hughes. No Scholar Athlete Award for girls was presented. 

A group of interested citizens again approached the School Committee 
for the addition of soccer to the athletic program. A goal of the athletic 
program will be the addition of sports where the need is demonstrated, 
and the total support for existing sports programs to assure the proper 
functioning of curriculum, supervision, and safety in the athletic program. 

R-espectfully submitted, 

BERNARD J. SHEA 
Director of Athletics 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

It is with pleasure that I submit this annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1972. 

The following is a list of schools and cafeteria managers: 

Senior High School (Mrs.) Alice Stewart 

Junior High School (Mrs.) Margaret Hansen 

R,alph Wheelock School (Mrs.) Mary Horgan 

Dale Street School (Mrs.) Mildred Grover 

Memorial School (Mrs.) Marjorie Sloan 

These managers and workers are responsible for the properly pre- 
pared lunches. 

134 



The State aids our program. This means that it is mandatory to 
provide the daily requirements in our menu of the "A" Type lunch. This 
is as follows: two ounces of lean meat, poultry or fish; or two ounces of 
cheese; or one egg; or one-half cup cooked dry beans or peas; or four 
tablespoons of peanut butter; or an equivalent quantity of any combina- 
tion of the above listed foods : a three-fourths cup serving consisting of two 
or more vegetables or fruits or both, in raw or cooked form; one slice 
whole grain or enriched bread; one teaspoon of butter or fortified mar- 
garine and one half-pint of whole unflavored milk. 

You have asked about serving more often the most popular menu, 
such as pizza, hamburg on roll, and frankfort on roll. From a nutritional 
standpoint, the students should try other foods. A variation should be 
provided in the menu rather than conventional foods continuously. Varia- 
tion will help a child develop more desirable eating habits. 

The combined cafeterias served 298,237 "A" Type lunches this 
year, (5715 lunches were for "needy" children), 121,456 cartons of milk 
were served. Parents who feel their child is eligible for "needy" lunches 
should contact the school principal or the lunch director. 

In September, Memorial School installed a much-needed new top 
burner stove, a convection oven, and the latest steam pressure cooker and 
kettle, plus some new tables and benches in the cafeteria. These addi- 
tions were made possible with financial aid from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts School Lunch Program. The equipment being installed in 
the kitchen was the reason for "sandwich lunches" being served last 
September. 

In January of 1973, Memorial School kitchen will be extending its 
baking program so that students will be able to have hot rolls and 
French bread. 

Nutrition Week was observed in January and National Lunch Week 
in October. On October 11th the universal lunch was served consisting of 
spaghetti with meat and tomato sauce, chef's salad, French bread and 
butter, peaches, peanut butter cookie and whole milk. 

The "lunch program" has been self-supporting. With the increase in 
cost of food, equipment, and labor, additional funds may be required. 

I sincerely thank the Superintendents, Assistant Superintendent, 
School Committee, Cafeteria Staff, and other personnel for their assist- 
ance. 

Respectfully submitted, 
DOROTHY E. AVERY 
School Lunch Director 

135 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 
I. Health Appraisal Services: 

A. Health examinations are conducted by a school physician in 
the presence of the school nurse, who enters the doctor's ob- 
servations on the school health records. 

B. All students in the fourth, seventh and tenth grades are to be 
examined under Chapter 71 of the General Laws of the Mass- 
achusetts Department of Public Health. Because the family 
physician has a comprehensive knowledge of the health status 
of the child we encourage that the physical examination be 
done by the family physician. 

C. Preschool children are to be examined by their own physi- 
cians prior to entering first grade in September. All pupils en- 
tering first grade and pupils transferring in from another 
school system are required to be immunized against communi- 
cable diseases such as diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and 
measles. These records are reviewed by the school nurse 
periodically. 

D. All pupils participating in competitive sports are examined 
before the start of practice. 

II. Vision Test: 

All pupils in grades one through twelve are vision tested annually. 
The Titmus Vision Tester is used. All failures are retested and all 
defects are reported to parents. Referral and follow-ups are con- 
ducted by the school nurse. 

The Lions Club, as a service to the people of Medfield, sponsors a 
Preschool Eye Clinic in the spring with the cooperation of a doc- 
tor, school nurses and other trained personnel. This is most benefi- 
cial to the parents as it gives them the opportunity to take the 
necessary steps to correct any defects before the child enters school 
in the fall. 

III. Hearing Tests : 

All pupils in grades one through twelve are individually tested an- 
nually by means of the Pure Tone Audiometer. All defects are indi- 
vidually charted on an audiogram by the nurse and notices are sent 
to the parents. Follow-ups are then conducted by the nurse. 



136 



IV. Chest X-Ray and Tuberculosis Screening: 

All school personnel are required by law to be X-rayed every three 
years. This program is carried on by Norfolk County Tuberculosis 
Association. All the records are kept by the School Nurse. This 
fall Tine Testing for T.B. was offered to all children in the first and 
ninth grades as well as the twelfth grades whose parents re- 
quested it be done. The School Nurse is responsible for recording 
these results. 

The Department of Public Health feels that case finding of tuber- 
culosis should be concentrated on those areas in which continued 
high rates of tuberculin-positive school children show that the com- 
munity contains uncontrolled active cases. As of now Medfield 
will no longer have test material available as we are in the low- 
risk category. This will be reviewed annually. 

V. First Aid: 

First Aid is administered by the nurse to all pupils for accidental 
injuries, sudden illnesses and other emergencies. First Aid is the 
immediate and temporary care given a pupil in school at the time of 
an accident or sudden illness until he can be returned to class, sent 
home, or the services of a physician obtained. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MADELEINE HARDING, R.N. 
NANCY C. KASHALENA, R.N. 

School Nurses 



137 



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REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR OF BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

To the Superintendent of Schools : 

It is a pleasure to submit my fourth annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1972. 

UiU- 

The following is a compilation of repair, replacement, additions and 
preventive maintenance done on our schools during the past year. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Repaired: All doors and locks in building, underground roof drain, 
tunnel steam lines, roof fans, univents, numerous roof repairs. 

Replaced: All steam heat traps in building, exit door in library, 
kitchen stove, oven, steamer, cafeteria tables, and chairs, seven boxes 
of floor tile. 

Purchased: Two fire extinguishers, two mobile chair racks, one 
step ladder. 

DALE STREET 

Repaired: Fire boxes in boilers, vacuum pump, chairs in auditorium, 
exterior doors, market forge steamer. 

Replaced: Section of boiler, all old door locks. 

Purchased: One 20' extension ladder, one 6' step ladder, two fare 
extinguishers, one wet vac, sump pump. 

Refinished: Classroom blackboards, gym and stage floors. 

WHEELOCK 

Painted: All outside doors. 

Refinished: 16 blackboards. 

Repaired: 7 univents, bearings and motors, check valve No. 1 cir- 
culator, caps on septic system. 

Purchased: One shampoo machine, one fire extinguisher. 

JUNIOR HIGH 

Painted: Main office, Principal and assistant Principal's offices, 
locker room floors. 



139 



Repaired: Telephone booth, book shelves in corridor, exterior doors, 
No, 1 check valve. 

Installed: Heater in Generator Room. 

SENIOR HIGH 

Repaired: Generator, roof, all outside doors, inside doors, toilet par- 
titions, thermostats, cafeteria tables, kitchen equipment, cold water make 
up units No. 1 and No. 2, fire boxes No. 1 and No. 2, kiln in art room. 

Purchased: Two fire extinguishers, two buffers. 

Painted: Locker room floors. 

In addition, all boilers, chimneys, and smoke pipes were cleaned. 
Glass, broken mainly by vandalism, was replaced throughout the system. 

All fields were fertilized and the baseball diamonds at the Senior and 
Junior High Schools were rebuilt. 

Personally, I wish to recognize Mr. John Grover and Mr. John Lori 
of our maintenance staff for the excellent work they have done in the 
past year. Their efforts have resulted in the saving of much time and 
money for our department. 

I am grateful for the support given to me by our day and night cus- 
todians and our groundsmen. 

Sincere appreciation is extended to the School Committee and to 
our new Superintendent for their cooperation and assistance during the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAROLD F. PRITONI 

Director of Buildings 
and Grounds 



140 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1972 



VITAL STATISTICS 



141 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Chapter 45 of the General Laws of Massachusetts requires that 
every physician shall within fifteen days after the birth at which he has 
officiated, report the same to the Town Clerk of the Town in which 
the birth took place. 

Parents within forty days after the birth of a child and every house- 
holder, within forty days after a birth in his house shall cause notice 
thereof to be given to the Town Clerk of the Town in which the birth 
took place. 

Failure to give such notice is punishable with a fine. 

Blanks for the return may be obtained upon application to the 
Town Clerk. 

Parents and others are requested to carefully examine the following 
lists and if there are any errors or omissions, report such at once to 
the Town Clerk. This is important so that we may have as accurate 
and complete a record of Vital Statistics as possible. 



142 



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TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elec- 
tions and in town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said 
Medfield, on Monday, the sixth clay of March A.D., 1972 at 6:00 o'clock 
A.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all town Officers required to be elected 
annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator, One Town Clerk, all for one year. 
One Selectman, One Assessor, One Treasurer, Two Trustees of the 
Public Library, Two Members of the School Committee, One Member 
of the Board of Health, One Cemetery Commissioner, One Member of 
the Water and Sewerage Board, One Member of the Park Commis- 
sion, all for three years. 
One Member of the Planning Board for five years. 

QUESTION OF ADOPTING A CHARTER 

"Shall this Town approve the new Charter recommended by the 
Charter Commission as summarized below?" 

Yes □ No □ 

Main features of proposed Charter: 

(a) Increased information for voters through an expanded Annual 
Town Meeting Warrant Report and public hearing prior to its 
publication ; 

(b) Dates of Town Election and Town Meeting changed in view 
of change in Town's Fiscal year required by law; 

( c ) Open Town Meetings ret ained ; 

(d) Three-member Board of Selectmen retained; 

(e) All present elective officers retained except four, which will 
become appointive to permit improved supervision of essen- 
tial Town services (Board of Health, Cemetery Commission, 
Tree Warden and Water and Sewerage Board.) 



157 



QUESTION OF PUBLIC POLICY 

"Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, holding or 
conducting a game commonly called Beano?" 

Yes □ No D 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 
8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the thirteenth day of March A.D. 1972 commencing at 
7:30 P.M., the following articles will be acted on the Amos Clark 
Kingsbun' School Gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate sums of 
money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, 
Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town 
for the current year or such other sums as the Town may determine 
as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. ^ 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of 
the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1972 and Jan- 
uary 1, 1973, in accordance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of Gen- 
eral Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use 
all means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected 
to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and com- 
pensation of the following elected officers : 

Moderator 
Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Board of Health 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Water and Sewerage Commissioners 

Planning Board 



158 



Park Commissioners 
Tree Warden 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 16 of 
the Personnel Administration Plan by changing the first sentence to 
read as follows: 

Regular full-time employees exclusive of the Department Heads 
will be paid one and one-half time for all hours worked in excess 
of forty (40) hours per week within the Department where the 
employee is regularly employed, effective July 1, 1972. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board & Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend certain positions 
under Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel 
Administration Plan as follows: t 



Position 




Rate Ran 


ge 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 


Mini- 


2nd 3rd 


4th 


Maxi- 




mum 


Step Step 


Step 


mum 


Sergeant 


9,600 


10,000 10,500 






Patrolmen 


7,260 


7,810 8,360 


9,000 


9,600 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 12 of the 
Personnel Administration Plan by deleting the table of Time Employed 
and substituting the following therefor: 

As of June 1st Each Year Length of 

Vacations 

6 months up to one year 5 days 

1 year, but less than five years 10 days 

5 years, but less than ten years 15 days 

10 years and over 20 days 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 10. To see what change the Town will vote to make in the 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Adminis- 
tration Plan as it pertains to the position of Recreation Coordinator, or 
take any other action relative thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 11. To see what action the Town wishes to take with regard 
to amending the Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules of the 
Personnel Administration Plan to read as follows: 



159 



REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 

Mini- 2nd 3rd 4th Maxi- 
mum Step Step Step mum 
LIBRARY 

Librarian annual 4,455 4,785 5,115 5,445 5,940 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court to enact legislation to remove 
the position of Chief of Police of the Town of Medfield from the opera- 
tion of the Civil Service Law, or take any other action relative thereto. 

( Personnel Board ) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan by adding a Section 24 as follows: 

For the purpose of this by-law, a Temporary Intermittent Police 
Officer working as a full-time scheduled officer shall be considered 
a regular part-time employee in the application of Section 12 (Vaca- 
tions), Section 14 (Sick Leave), and Section 15 (Holidays) and shall 
be paid or given time off accordingly. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 

Administration Plan as follows: 

1) by adding to section 14 (Sick Leave), sub-section "a" the follow- 
ing: 

Upon completion of 30 days of regular part-time employ- 
ment, an employee in a Regular part-time position paid on an 
annual basis shall be allowed one normal working day of 
sick leave with pay for each month of employment completed 
in any given calendar year provided such leave is caused by 
sickness or injury or by exposure to contagious disease, but 
not by injury sustained in other employment. 

2) by inserting in Section 23 (Funeral Leave) after the phrase 
"Regular full-time employees" the following: 

and regular part-time employees paid on an annual basis 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Trustees of the Memorial Public Library) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classifica- 
tion of Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration 
Plan so that it reads as follows: 



160 



CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 

Position Mini- 2nd 3rd 4th Maxi- 

mum Step Step Step mum 
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 

Admin. Secretary Annual 5,940 6,380 6,820 7,260 7,660 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote a Step-increase or a 5.5% 
pay increase for the following positions in the Street Department Pay 
Schedule: 

Foreman, Equipment Operator Repairman, Heavy Equipment Oper- 
ator and Light Equipment Operator, and to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money therefor, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote a 5.5% pay increase for 
the folowing positions in the Water and Sewerage Department Pay 
Schedule : 

Foreman, Light Equipment Operator and Secretary, and to raise 
and appropriate a sum of money therefor, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Water 
and Sewerage Board to appoint one of its members as Water Superin- 
tendent, and to fix the compensation for said position, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. (Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Cemetery 
Commissioners to appoint one of its members as Superintendent, and 
to fix the compensation for said position, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Cemetery Commissioners) 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 26 of 
the Annual Town Meeting of March 11, 1963 as follows: 

After the first sentence, insert the following sentence- 

"No such person shall solicit after dark, unless by prior ap- 
pointment." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to substitute the follow- 
ing for Section 14 of Article IV, Police Regulations, of the Town By- 
laws: 

"Article IV, Section 14. 

"No person shall fire or discharge any firearm within the limits of 
any park, playground, or other public property except with the 

161 



consent of the Board of Selectmen, or hunt or fire or discharge 
any firearm or any private property except with the consent of the 
owner or legal occupant thereof. This by-law shall not apply to the 
lawful defense of life or property, or to any law enforcement officer 
acting in the discharge of his duties. Any person violating any of 
the provisions of this by-law shall be punished by a fine of not more 
than twenty (20) dollars for each offense." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to purchase and 
equip one or more vehicles for use as police cruisers, and to authorize 
The Board of Selectmen to trade or sell the present cruisers as part of 
the purchase price, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

( Police Department ) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Nineteen Thousand Dollars ($19,000.) for the purchase of 
a truck chassis and body for the Street Department and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price a 1954 
White chassis, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds the sum of Two Thousand, Two 
Hundred and Forty Dollars ($2,240.) for the instalation of storm 
drainage in Pleasant Street between Curve Street and Metacomet Street, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds the sum of Fifty-nine Hundred 
Dollars ($5,900.) for the purpose of replacing a drainage culvert in 
Upham Road, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars ($1,500.) as the Town's Chapter 
90 share for the maintenance of Chapter 90 roads; said funds to be used 
with funds allotted by the County and State, or take any other action 
relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
Six Thousand, Five Hundred and Twenty-five Dollars ($6,525.) as the 
Town's Chapter 90 share for the reconstruction of Hospital Road and 
Harding Street and/or North Street, and to authorize the Selectmen 
to enter into any and all contracts necessary or incidental thereto, said 
money to be used with funds allotted by the County and State, or take 
any action relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 



162 



ARTICLE 28. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to raise 
and appropriate, borrow or transfer from available funds, including 
the stabilization fund, for the construction of a Town Garage; and to see 
if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into 
contracts for the same, to approve payment of bills and to accept the 
work when completed, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Garage Committee and Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways 

the following named streets or parts thereof: 

Lakewood Drive from Station 1 + 20.91 to Station 6 + 75.00 

Lee Road from Station 14 -f 90.00 to Station 20 + 89.76 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred 
to in the Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's Office and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage ease- 
ments as may be necessary to accomplish such purpose, or take any 
other action relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds the following sums for the purpose 
of paying land damages arising from the relocation of the following 
named streets : 

North Street $512.08 

Philip Street 270.00 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of Eight Thousand Dollars ($8,000.) for the purpose of ad- 
justing town utilities in conjunction with the construction of proposed 
Route 27, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way 
a portion of Green Street extending in a westerly direction approxi- 
mately one hundred and eighty (180) feet from its intersection with 
Brook Street, and an easterly direction approximately four hundred and 
sixty (460) feet from its intersection with Brook Street to Tow*n-owned 
property, as relocated by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on a 
plan by Cheney Engineering Company, Inc., entitled, "Relocation of a 
Portion of Green Street", dated January 11, 1972 and filed with the 
Town Clerk, to authorize the Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain 
or otherwise such rights, titles and easements in such lands as are ne- 
cessary therefor to accomplish said purposes and further to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the payment of land damages therefor, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to appoint a committee to study the feasibility of having 



163 



the records of the town departments maintained by electronic data 
processing or similar processing, and to see what sum of money the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate for the expenses of said com- 
mittee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws by 
adding Section 23 to Article 11 as folows: 

"The Board of Selectmen may apply for and enter into contracts 
for grants or gifts of funds from the federal government, the state 
government, a charitable foundation, a private corporation, or an 
individual; provided, however, that no contract calling for expendi- 
ture of funds by the Town shall be entered into until such time 
as the funds have been appropriated by vote of the Town. The 
School Committee shall have the same powers as the Board of 
Selectmen regarding grants or gifts of funds for educational pur- 
poses." 

or take any other action relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer a sum of money for the purpose of providing recreation 
for the physically and mentaly handicapped, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 36. To hear and act on the reports of any special committee 
appointed at any previous Special Town Meeting or Annual Town Meet- 
ing or appointed by the Moderator or Selectmen as authorized by the 
vote of the Town. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds the sum of Twelve Thousand 
Dollars ($12,000.) to the Conservation Fund for the purchase of Lot 
726 as shown on the Assessors' plans, 10.3 acres, located on Noon 
Hill Road, now or formerly belonging to James F. Gilmore, Frederick 
H. Gilmore, Warren R. Gilmore and Samuel R. Gilmore, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission 
to apply to any and all Federal, State and private agencies or individuals 
for grants, gifts or other reimbursements for all or part of the purchase 
price, or take any action relative thereto. (Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars 
($20,000.00) to the Conservation Fund, to purchase Lot 737 as shown 
on the Assessors' Plans, 9.9 acres, on Noon Hill, now or formerly be- 
longing to Delmer Kelley, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen and 
the Conservation Commission to apply to any and all Federal, State and 
private agencies or individuals for grants, gifts or other reimbursements 
for all or part of the purchase price or take any action relative thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 



164 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money to the Conserva- 
tion Fund to purchase lot 1179 as shown on the Assessors' Plans, 
25.8 acres, located on Noon Hill Road and portion of lot 1178 as 
shown on the Assessors' Plans, approximately 2.5 acres, abutting 
Stop River, now or formerly belonging to Catherine M. Ramsdell, and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission 
to apply to any and all Federal, State and private agencies or individu- 
als for grants, gifts or other reimbursements, for all or part of the 
purchase price, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds the sum of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.) for the "Conservation Fund", or do or act anything in re- 
lation thereto. (Conservation Commission) 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer the sum of Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars ($950.) for the 
paving of the diagonal sidewalk in Baxter Park, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. (Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow or transfer from available funds the sum of Sixty-one 
Hundred Dollars ($6,100.) to repair approximately 170 feet in length 
of bulging retaining wall at Baker's Pond; and authorize the Park 
and Recreation Commission to enter into contracts for the work to 
approve payment of bills for the work and to accept the work when 
completed, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow or transfer from a.vailable funds Two Thousand Dollars 
($2,000.) to repair the retaining wall and sidewalks at Baker's Pond, 
corner of Frairy and North Streets; and authorize the Park and Recre- 
ation Commission to enter into contracts for the work, to approve 
payments of bills for the work and to accept the work when completed, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow or transfer from available funds Five Hundred Dollars 
($500.) to reset granite caps in certain areas of Baker's Pond retaining 
wall; and authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to enter into 
contracts for the work, to approve payment of bills for the work and 
to accept the work when completed, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow or transfer from available funds Four Hundred Dollars 
($400.) to repair the Baker's Pond granite retaining wall on the south- 



165 



cast corner facing North Street; and authorize the Park and Recreation 
Commission to enter into contracts for the work, to approve payment 
of bills for the work and to accept the work when completed, or take 
any other action relative thereto. (Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or borrow or transfer from available funds the sum of One Thou- 
sand Dollars ($1,000.) to replace and/or repair fencing at Baker's 
Pond; and authorize the Park and Recreation Commission to enter into 
contracts for the work, to approve payment of bills for the work and 
to accept the work when completed, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/cr transfer the sum of Two Thousand Six Hundred Dollars 
($2,600.) for the purpose of purchasing and installing an aeration/cir- 
culation system at the Corporal Stephen Hinkley Memorial Park, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
and/or transfer the sum of Three Thousand Dollars ($3,000.) to be 
disbursed by the Park and Recreation Commission, for the purposes 
of employing engineering consultants, securing plans and specifications, 
and initiating preliminary work to present a comprehensive plan for 
the development of Metacomet Park as a recreational and sports area, 
to the Massachusetts Bureau of Natural Resources and/or the Federal 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, or other govern- 
mental agencies having funds for this purpose, for approval as a joint 
project, eligible for joint funding, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Park and Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to form a School Survey 
Committee, to be appointed by the Moderator, to consist of one member 
from the School Committee, one member from the School Planning 
and Building Committee, one member from the Finance Committee, 
one member from the Planning Board and three members at large, 
said committee to be charged with the responsibility of making an 
in-depth study of the Town's public school curriculum, facilities and 
management, to make recommendations and to assist with the im- 
plementation of such recommendations, and that said committee be 
empowered to retain consultants to assist with carrying out the pur- 
poses of this article and that a sum of money, to be expended over a 
three-year period, be raised and appropriated for this purpose, or 
take any other action relative thereto. (Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 50. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds for the 
purpose of updating the Master Plan, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (Planning Board) 



166 



ARTICLE 51. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the 
purpose of replacing the 1954 chassis for the 1954 forest truck for 
the Fire Department, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department ) 

ARTICLE 52. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for 
the purpose of purchasing a new 1000 gallon per minute Class A Pumper 
for the Fire Department, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to make an engineering survey and to drill test wells in 
order to seek new water supply, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the 1972 Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to substitute the following 
for the existing Zoning By-law, upon approval of the Attorney General: 

ZONING BY-LAW 

for the 

Town of Medfield, Massachusetts 

SECTION 1 

SCOPE 

1.1 TITLE 

This Bylaw shall be known and may be cited as the Zoning 
Bylaw for the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, which herein 
is called "this Bylaw." 

1.2 AUTHORITY 

This Bylaw is adopted by virtue of and pursuant to the author- 
ity granted to the Town of Medfield by Chapter 40A of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as now 
existing or hereafter amended herein called the Zoning Ena- 
bling Act. 

1.3 PURPOSE 

To promote the health, safety, convenience and welfare of 
the inhabitants of Medfield by lessening congestion in the 
streets; securing safety from fires, panic, or other danger; 
providing adequate light and air; preventing the overcrowding 
of land; avoiding undue congestion of population; facilitating 



167 



the adequate provision of transportation, water, sewerage, 
schools, parks, and other public requirements; and by other 
means in accordance with a comprehensive Master Plan pre- 
pared during the years 1963 and 1964. 

SECTION 2 

DEFINITIONS 

2.1 For the purpose of this Bylaw, certain terms and words shall 

have the meaning given herein. Words used in the present 
tense include the future. The singular number includes the 
plural, and the plural the singular. The words used or occu- 
pied include the words designed, arranged, intended or offered 
to be used or occupied. The words building, structure, lot, 
land or premises shall be construed as though followed by 
the words "or any portion thereof." The word shall is always 
mandatory and not merely directory. 

Terms and words not denned herein but denned in the Med- 
field Building Code shall have the meanings given therein 
unless a contrary intention clearly appears. Words not defined 
in either place shall have the meaning given in Webster's 
Unabridged Dictionary, Third Edition. Uses listed in the Table 
of Use Regulations under the classes Retail and Service Trades 
and Wholesale Trade and Manufacturing shall be further defined 
by the Standard Industrial Classification Manual published 
by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. 

2.1.1 Abandonment — The visible or otherwise apparent 
intention of an owner to discontinue a nonconform- 
ing use of a building or premises, or the removal 
of the characteristic equipment or furnishing used 
in the performance of the nonconforming use, with- 
out its replacement by similar equipment or furnish- 
ings, or the replacement of the nonconforming use 
or building by a conforming use or building. 

2.1.2 Alteration — Any construction, reconstruction or other 
action resulting in a change in the structural parts 
or height, number of stories, size, use or location of a 
building or other structure. 

2.1.3 Board — The Board of Appeals of the Town of Med- 
field, Massachusetts. 

2.1.4 Building — A combination of any materials, whether 
portable or fixed, having a roof, to form a structure 
for the shelter of persons, animals or property. For 
the purposes of this definition "roof" shall include 
an awning or any similar covering, whether or not per- 
manent in nature. 



168 



2.1.5 Building Accessory — A detached subordinate build- 
ing, the use of which is customarily incidental and 
subordinate to that of the principal building, and 
which is located on the same lot as that occupied by 
the principal building. 

2.1.6 Community Facilities — Premises owned and operated 
by a governmental or other chartered nonprofit organ- 
ization but not including fraternal, sports or similar 
membership organizations. 

2.1.7 Driveway, Legal Service — An open space, located on 
a private lot, which is not more than 24 feet in width 
built for access to a private garage or off-street park- 
ing space. 

2.1.8 Drive-In Establishment — A premise in which per- 
sons while in cars are served, view, purchase and/or 
consume as appropriate; food, movies, goods, materials 
or equipment. 

2.1.9 Dwelling, Multi-Family — A building containing three 
or more dwelling units. 

2.1.10 Dwelling, Row — A dwelling, building containing three 
or more attached one-family dwelling units each with 
its own exit. 

2.1.11 Dwelling Unit — One or more living or sleeping 
rooms arranged for the use of one or more individuals 
living as a single housekeeping unit, with cooking, 
living, sanitary and sleeping facilities. 

2.1.12 Eessential Services — The erection, construction, al- 
teration, or maintenance by public utilities or govern- 
mental agencies of underground or overhead gas, elec- 
trical, steam, or water transmission or distribution 
systems, collection, communication, supply, or disposal 
system, including poles, wires, mains, drains, sewers, 
pipes, conduits, cables, fire alarm boxes, police call 
boxes, traffic signals, hydrants and other similar 
equipment and accessories in connection therewith, but 
not including buildings necessary for the furnishing of 
adequate service by such public utilities or governmen- 
tal agencies for the public health or safety or general 
welfare. 

2.1.13 Family — One or more persons, including domestic 
employees, occupying a dwelling unit and living as a 
single, nonprofit housekeeping unit. 

2.1.14 Flood Plain District — The Flood Plain District is 
superimposed over any other district established by 



169 



this bylaw. The Flood Plain District is defined as all 
lands along or sloping to the Stop River and Charles 
River whose elevation is below 125 feet Mean Sea 
Level based on the Massachusetts Geodetic Datum of 
1929 and as shown on the Zoning Map of the Town 
of Medfield. 

2.1.15 Floor Area, Net — The sum of the areas of the sev- 
eral floors of a building, measured from the exterior 
face of the walls. It does not include cellars, un- 
enclosed porches, or attics not used for human occu- 
pancy or any floor space in accessory buildings or in 
the main building, intended and designed for the park- 
ing of motor vehicles in order to meet the parking re- 
quirements of this Bylaw, or any such floor space 
intended and designed for accessory heating and ven- 
tilating equipment. 

2.1.16 Floor Area Ratio (F.A.R.) — The ratio of the net 
floor area of the principal building to the total lot area. 

2.1.17 Height — The vertical distance from the adjacent 
ground to the top of the structure or higest roof 
beam of a flat roof, the mean level of the higest gable, 
and slope of a hip roof. 

2.1.18 Home Occupation — An accessory use which by cus- 
tom has been carried on entirely within and only by 
the occupants of a dwelling unit, which use is inci- 
dental and subordinate to the dwelling use, and which 
does not in any manner change the residential charac- 
ter of the building. 

2.1.19 Loading Space — An off-street space used for loading 
or unloading and which is not less than 14 feet in 
width, 45 feet in length and 14 feet in height and con- 
taining not less than 1300 square feet, including both 
access and maneuvering area. 

2.1.20 Lodging Unit — One or more rooms contained in a 
lodging house for the use of one or more individuals 
not living as a single housekeeping unit and not hav- 
ing cooking facilities. A "Lodging Unit" shall include 
a boarding unit, tourist house unit, or a rooming unit. 

2.1.21 Lot — An area or parcel of land in the same ownership 
or any part thereof designated by its owner or owners 
as a separate lot. For purposes of this Bylaw a lot 
may or may not have boundaries identical with those 
recorded in the Norfolk County Court House. 



170 



2.1.22 Lot, Corner — A lot at the point of intersection of 
and abutting on two or more intersecting streets, the 
angle of intersection of the street lot line, or in case 
of a curved street extended lot lines, being not more 
than 135 degrees. 

2.1.23 Lot Depth — The mean horizontal distance between 
the front lot line and the rear lot line. 

2.1.24 Lot Line, Front — The proprety line dividing a lot 
from a street. On a corner lot only one street line 
shall be considered the front line, except in those 
cases where the latest deed restrictions specify another 
line as the front lot line. 

2.1.25 Lot Line, Rear — The lot line opposite from the front 
lot line, except in the case of corner lot, the owner 
shall have the option of choosing which of the two 
lot lines which are not street lines is to be considered 
the rear lot line. 

2.1.26 Lot Line, Side — Any lot line not a front or rear lot 
line. 

2.1.27 Lot, Nonconforming — A lot lawfully existing at the 
effective date of this Bylaw, or any subsequent amend- 
ment thereto, which is not in conformity with all pro- 
visions of this Bylaw. 

2.1.28 Lot, Through — An interior lot, the front and rear 
lot lines of which abut streets, or a corner lot two 
opposite lines of which abut streets. 

2.1.29 Lot Width — The horizontal distance between the side 
lot lines as measured at the required front yard depth 
which may or may not coincide with the actual front 
setback line. 

2.1.30 Membership Club — A building used to house a non- 
profit social, sports or fraternal association or organi- 
zation which is used exclusively by members and their 
guests and which may or may not contain bar facilities. 

2.1.31 Open Area Residential Development — A residential 
development of a tract of land over 10 acres subject 
to area regulations less than the minimum required 
per individual lot as specified in table of area regula- 
tions wherein the total number of lots does not exceed 
the number of lots which can be developed under 
Planned Residential Development. 

2.1.32 Owner — The duly authorized agent, attorney, pur- 
chaser, devicce, trustee or any person having vested or 



171 



equitable interest in the use, structure or lot in ques- 
tion. 

2.1.33 Parking Space — An off-street space having an area of 
not less than 200 square feet, plus access and maneu- 
vering space, whether inside or outside a structure 
for exclusive use as a parking stall for one motor 
vehicle. 

2.1.34 Person - The word "person" shall include one or 
more individuals, a partnership, an association and a 
corporation. 

2.1.35 Planned Development — Any development involving 
the construction of two or more principal dwellings 
or community facility buildings on a single lot. 

2.1.36 Recorded — Recorded in the Norfolk Registry of Deeds 
or registered in the Norfolk Registry District of the 
Land Court. 

2.1.37 Residential Area — A residential area is any area situ- 
ated within a district zoned primarily for residential 
purposes under the Zoning Bylaw. It includes RE, RT, 
RS and RU. 

2.1.38 Sign — The word "sign" shall include any letter, word 
symbol, drawing, picture, design, device, article, and 
object that advertises, calls attention to or indicates 
any premises, person or activity, whatever the nature 
of the material and manner of composition or con- 
struction. 

2.1.39 Sign, Accessory — Any billboard, sign or other ad- 
vertising device that advertises, calls attention to, or 
indicates the person occupying the premises on which 
the sign is erected or the business transacted thereon, 
or advertises the property itself, or any part thereof 
as for sale or to let, and which contains no other 
advertising matter. 

2.1.40 Sign, Nonaccessory — Any billboard, sign or other ad- 
vertising device that does not come within the fore- 
going definition of an accessory sign. 

2.1.41 Sign, Advertising — A sign used to direct attention to 
a service, sale or other activity not performed on the 
same premises upon which the sign is located. 

2.1.42 Sign, Business — A sign used to direct attention to a 
service, product sold or other activity performed on 
the same premises upon which the sign is located. 



171 



2.1.43 Sign, Identification — A sign used simply to identify 
the name, taddress and title of an individual family or 
firm occupying the premises upon which the sign is 
located. 

2.1.44 Sign, Size — In applying the maximum height and 
width limitations prescribed in this Bylaw for signs, 
any intermediary removable surface to which a sign 
is affixed shall be deemed to be a part of the sign. 

2.1.45 Sign, Standing — The term "standing Sign" shall in- 
clude any and every sign erected on or affixed to the 
land and any and every exterior sign that is not at- 
tached to a building. 

2.1.46 Sign, Surface Area of 

2.1.46.1 For a sign, either free-standing, or attached, 
the area shall be considered to include all 
lettering, wording, and accompanying de- 
signs and symbols, together with the back- 
ground, whether open or enclosed, on which 
they are displayed, but not including any 
supporting framework and bracing which are 
incidental to the display itself. 

2.1.46.2 For a sign painted upon or applied to a 
building, the area shall be considered to in- 
clude all lettering, wording, and accompany- 
ing designs or symbols together with any 
backing of a different color than the finish 
material of the building face. 

2.1.46.3 Where the sign consists of individual letters 
or symbols attached to or painted on a sur- 
face, building, wall or window, the area shall 
be considered to be that of the smallest qua- 
drangle which encompasses all of the letters 
and symbols. 

2.1.47 Special Permit — A use of a structure or lot or any 
action upon a premises which may be permitted under 
this Bylaw only upon application to and the approval 
of the Board and in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 13. 

2.1.48 Store — A "store" shall include any establishment, 
office or place of business. 

2.1.49 Story — A "story" is defined ias that part of a building 
between any floor and the floor or roof next above. 
For the purposes of this Zoning Bylaw, where a build- 



173 



ing Is not divided into stories, a story shall bo con- 
sidered fin con (15) feet in height. 

2.1.50 Street A way which is dedicated or devoted to public 
use by legal mapping by the user, or by any other 
lawful procedure, and includes any avenue, boulevard, 
parkway, road, land, public square, highway and similar 
public ways which affords the prescribed means of 
principal access to an abutting lot. 

2.1.51 Structure — A combination of materials assembled at 
a fixed location to give support or shelter, such as 
a building, bridge, trestle, tower, framework, retaining 
wall, tank, tunnel, tent, stadium, reviewing stand, 
platform, bin, fence, sign, flagpole, swimming pool 
or the like. 

2.1.52 Structure, Nonconforming — A structure lawfully ex- 
isting at the effective date of this Bylaw or any subse- 
quent amendment thereto, which is not in conformity 
with all provisions of this Bylaw. 

2.1.53 Substantially Different Use — Any use which is not 
permitted either by right, or by Special Permit of 
the Board of Appeals within the district in which 
the lot is located. 

2.1.54 Substantially Greater Extent — An accessory use which 
exceeds 40 percent of the floor area of the existing 
structure or any principal use which encroaches into 
any yard or set back area. 

2.1.55 Usable Open Space — Space in a yard or within a set 
back area on a lot that is unoccupied by buildings, 
unobstructed to the sky, not devoted to service drive- 
ways or off-street loading or parking spaces and 
available to all occupants of the building on the lot 
expressed as a percentage of gross floor area. 

2.1.56 Use — ■ The purpose for which a structure or lot is 
arranged, designed, or intended to be used, occupied 
or maintained. 

2.1.57 Use, Accessory -- A use customarily incidental and 
subordinate to the principal use of a structure or 
lot, or a use not the principal use which is located 
on the same lot as the principal structure. 

2.1.58 Use, Nonconforming — A use lawfully existing at the 
effective date of this Bylaw or any subsequent amend- 
ment thereto which is not in conformity with the 
provisions of this Bylaw. 



174 



2.1.59 Use, Principal — The main or primary purpose for 
which a structure or lot is designed, arranged, or 
intended, or for which they may be used, occupied 
or maintained under this Bylaw. Any other use within 
the main structure or the use of any other structure 
or land on the same lot and incidental or supplemen- 
tary thereto and permitted under this Bylaw shall 
be considered an accessory use. 

2.1.60 Variance — Such departure from the terms of this 
Bylaw as the Board, upon appeal in specific areas is 
empowered to authorize under the terms of Section 13. 

2.1.61 Watershed Protection District — The Watershed Pro- 
tection District is superimposed over any other dis- 
trict established by this Bylaw. The Watershed Protec- 
tion District is defined as all land area along the 
streams and brooks for a horizontal distance of at least 
25 feet on each side of the centerline thereof and 
adjacent low, marshy areas, as shown on the Zoning 
Map of the Town of Medfield. The Watershed Protec- 
tion Dsitrict shall also include all land that lies within 
a horizontal distance of 25 feet from the normal 
high water line of major water bodies. (See Section 
11.2.1 and 11.2.2.) 

2.1.62 Yard — A portion of a lot, other than a court on the 
same lot as the principal building, unobstructed arti- 
ficially from the ground to the sky, except as other- 
wise provided herein. 

2.1.63 Yard, Front — A space extending for the full width 
of the lot between the front line of the nearest build- 
ing wall and the front lot line. 

2.1.64 Yard, Rear — A space, unoccupied, except by an acces- 
sory structure or accessory use as herein permitted, 
extending for the full width of the lot between the 
rear line of the building wall and the rear lot line. 

2.1.65 Yard, Side — An unoccupied space extending for the 
full length of a building between the nearest building 
wall and the side lot line. 

2.1.66 Zoning Bylaw — The Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Medfield as from time to time in force and effect. 
2.1.67 Zoning Enabling Act — Chapter 40A of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts and amendments thereto. 



175 



SECTION 3 
ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONING DISTRICTS 
vl DIVISION INTO DISTRICTS 

The Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, is hereby divided into 

seven zoning districts to be designated as follows: 

Full Name Abbreviation 

Residential Estate R-E 

Residential Town R-T 

Residential Suburban R-S 

Residential Urban R-U 

Business B 

Business-Industrial B-I 

Industrial Extensive I-E 

3.2 ZONING MAP 

The location and boundaries of the Zoning District are hereby 
established as shown on a map and titled "Zoning Map, Medfield, 
Massachusetts" dated January 11, 1972, which accompanies 
and is hereby declared to be a part of this Bylaw. The authenti- 
city of the Zoning Map shall be identified by the signature of 
the Town Clerk, and the imprinted seal of the Town under 
the words: "This is to certify that this is the Zoning Map of 
the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, referred to in the Zoning 
Bylaw of the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, which was 
adopted by the Town Meeting commencing March 6, 1972." 
Any subsequent change in the location of boundaries of a 
Zoning District hereafter made through the amendment of this 
Bylaw shall be authenticated in the same manner. The Zoning 
Map shall be located in the Office of the Planning Board. 
Photographic reductions of this large scale zoning map may 
serve as copies of the zoning map in any subsequent printing 
of this Bylaw. 

3.3 BOUNDARIES OF DISTRICTS 

Where any uncertainty exists with respect to the boundary of 
any district as shown on the Zoning Map, the following rules 
apply: 

3.3.1 Where a boundary is indicated as a street, railroad, 
watercourse or other body of water, it shall be con- 
strued to be the centerline or middle thereof, or where 
such boundary approximates a Town boundary then to 
the limits of the Town boundary. 

3.3.2 Where a boundary is indicated as following approxi- 
mately or parallel to a street, railroad, watercourse, or 
other body of water, it shall be construed to be parallel 
thereto and at such distance therefrom as shown on 
the Zoning Map. 

176 



3.3.3 Where a boundy is indicated as a definitive eleva- 
tion, it shall be construed as the datum mean sea level 
of the United States Geological Survey. 

3.3.4 When a district boundary line divides any lot in 
one ownership of record at the time such line is 
adopted, a use that is permitted on one portion of 
the lot may be extended 30 feet into the other portion 
provided the first portion includes the required fron- 
tage. This allowance does not apply to Flood Plain 
or Watershed Protection Districts described in Sec- 
tions 10 and 11. 

SECTION 4 
INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATION 

4. 1 INTERPRETATION 

The provisions of this Bylaw shall be interpreted to be the 
minimum requirements adopted for the promotion of the 
health, safety, or the general welfare of the Town of Medfield, 
Massachusetts, and except for the Zoning Bylaw adopted by 
the Town Meeting on April 21, 1938, and all subsequent amend- 
ments thereto, the provisions of this Bylaw are not intended 
to repeal, amend, abrogate, annul or in any way impair or 
interfere with any lawfully adopted law, statute, ordinance, 
bylaw, covenants, regulations or rules. Whenever the regula- 
tions made under the authority hereof differ from those pre- 
scribed by any law, statute, ordinance, bylaw or other regula- 
tions, that provision which imposes the greater restriction or 
the higher standard shall govern. 

4.2 APPLICATION 

Except as herein provided, or as specifically exempted by a 
shall clause of the Zoning Enabling Act, the provisions of this 
Bylaw shall apply to the following: the erection, construction, 
reconstruction, alteration, or use of buildings and structures 
or use of land. Any existing conforming use, structure or 
lot shall not by any action become nonconforming and any 
existing nonconforming use, structure or lot shall not become 
nonconforming or further nonconforming except as provided 
herein. 

SECTION 5 

USE REGULATIONS 

5.1 APPLICABILITY OF USE REGULATIONS 

Except as provided by the Zoning Enabling Act or in this 
Bylaw in each district no building, structure, or land shall be 



177 



used or occupied except for the purposes permitted in the 
district in this Section applicable thereto. Any use not listed 
shall be construed to be prohibited. 

5.2 PERMITTED USES 

In the following Table of Use Regulations, the uses permitted 
by right in the district shall be designated by the word 'Yes." 
Those uses that may be permitted by Special Permit in the 
district, in accordance with Section 13, shall be designated by 
the letters "SP". Uses designated by the word "No" shall not 
be permitted in the district. 

5.3 USES SUBJECT TO OTHER REGULATIONS 

5.3.1 Uses permitted by right or by Special Permit shall 
be subject, in addition to use regulations, to such 
regulations of height, area, yard, setback, lot size, lot 
area, lot width, floor area ratio, usable open space, 
parking, loading, sign and all other provisions of this 
Bylaw. 

5.3.2 In any district no building or premises shall be 
erected, altered or used for any purpose injurious, dan- 
gerous, noxious, or offensive to the community by 
reason of the emission of odor, fumes, dust, smoke, 
vibration, noise or other cause. 

5.3.3. No vehicular access to an Industrial District shall be 
on land that is zoned Residential. Vehicular access 
to an Industrial District shall be over a public way. 

5.3.4 New public ways and ways into Industrial Districts 
will be constructed in accordance with the latest Land 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations for the Town of 
Medfield, Massachusetts. 

5.3.5 Existing public ways, when rebuilt, will be constructed 
to conform reasonably with the latest Land Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations for the Town of Medfield, Mass- 
achusetts. 

5.3.6 For multifamiiy dwellings, all waste water shall be 
disposed of by means of adequate connection to the 
sewage system of the Town of Medfield. 

5.4 TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 

The Table of Use Regulations that immediately follows is de- 
clared to be part of this Bylaw. 



178 



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183 



SECTION 6 
AREA, HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 
6. 1 APPLICABILITY OF AREA, HEIGHT AND 

BULK REGULATIONS 

The regulations for each district pertaining to minimum lot 
area, minimum lot width, minimum lot depth, maximum 
height of buildings, maximum number of stories, maximum 
floor area ratio, minimum usable open space, minimum front 
yard depth, minimum side yard width, minimum rear yard 
depth, and minimum residential net floor area shall be as spe- 
cified in this section and set forth in the Table of Area Regula- 
tions and Table of Height and Bulk Regulations, and subject to 
the further provisions of this Section. 

See Table of Area Regulations, plus attached notes which 
are declared to be part of this Bylaw. 






184 



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185 



6.2 Tabic of Area Regulation Notes 

6.2.1 Except for Planned Developments, Community Facil- 
ities and public utilities (See Section 13.) only one 
principal structure shall be permitted on one lot. 

6.2.2 A corner lot shall have minimum street yards with 
depths which shall be the same as the required front 
yard depths for the adjoining lots. 

6.2.3 A side yard which is used for legal service driveway 
shall have a minimum width of 12 feet. 

6.2.4 At each end of a through lot, there shall be a set- 
back depth required which is equal to the front yard 
depth required for the district in which each street 
frontage is located. 

6.2.5 Building within the Flood Plain District or Water- 
shed Protection District shall be subject to Sections 
10 and 11. 

6.2.6 Projections into required yards, or other required open 
spaces are permitted subject to the following: 

ET _ 

a. Balcony or bay window limited in total length to 

one half the length of the building, not more than 
two feet. 

b. Open terrace, or steps or stoop under 4 feet in 
height up to one half the required yard setback. 

c. Steps or stoop over 4 feet in height, window sill, belt 
course, chimney, roof eave, fire escape, fire features, 
not more than 2 feet. 

6.2.7 In "B" and "B-I" Districts all uses shall be conducted 
within a completely enclosed building, except dis- 
pensing of food, beverages or goods at a drive-in or 
stand; dispensing of gas, water or lubricants at a 
garage or gasoline service station; vegetation; permit- 
ted parking or loading area; and permitted exterior 
signs. 

6.2.8 Screening and buffers shall be required in the Indus- 
trial-Extensive (I-E) District. There shall be a land- 
scaped buffer strip along each boundary which adjoins 
a residential district. This strip shall be at least 150 feet 
in width and shall be portioned as follows: 

a. The portion of such buffer strip within one hun- 
dred feet of the district boundary line shall be used 
only for, and maintained as, a planting area for 



186 



trees, shrubs, or other landscape materials to pro- 
vide a parklike area of separation between districts. 

b. The remaining fifty (50) feet of space may be used 
for off-street parking or other permitted open 
uses, but shall not contain any permanent struc- 
ture. 

6.2.9 In a Business District or a Business -Industrial Dis- 
trict or a lot in a R-U District on which a multi- 
family dwelling is placed, there shall be a landscaped 
buffer strip along each boundary which adjourns a resi- 
dential lot. The strip shall be at least 10 feet in width 
and shall contain a screen of plantings in the center 
of the strip not less than five feet in width and six 
feet in height at the time of occupancy of any lot. 
Individual bushes or trees shall be planted not more 
than three feet on centers, and shall thereafter be 
maintained by the owner or occupants so as to main- 
tain a dense screen year round. One hundred percent of 
the plantings shall consist of evergreens. No building 
shall be placed within this buffer strip. 

6.2.10 In any "R" District any permitted accessory building 
shall conform to the following provisions: It shall not 
occupy more than 40 percent of the required rear yard; 
it shall be not less than 60 feet from any street lot 
line, except on a corner lot if used for garage pur- 
poses, then the same distance as the required depth 
of the front yard for the adjacent lots; it shall not be 
less than six feet from any lot line. 

6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 

See Table of Height and Bulk Regulations, plus notes which 
are declared to be part of this Bylaw. 
r 

6.3 TABLE OF HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS 



District 

R-E 

R-T 

R-S 

R-U 

B 

B-I 

I-E 



Maximum 


Permitted 


Maximum 


Height 


Height 


Floor Area Ratio 


(feet) 


(Stories) 


Inc. Ace. Bldgs. 


35 


2V 2 


0.20 


35 


2V 2 


0.25 


35 


2V 2 


0.35 


35 


3 or 4* 


0.40 


30 


2 


0.75 


30 


2 


0.75 


ee Appendix 


G, 


0.50 



Building Code, Town 

of Medfield, Massachusetts 



187 



for maximum permitted height 
in feet and the maximum number 
of story heights permitted) 



District 



R-E 
R-T 
R-S 
R-U 



B 

B-I 

I-E 



Minimum 


Minimum 


Multi-family 


Usable 


Residential 


Dwelling 


Open space 


Net floor area 


Minimum Unit 


Percent 


(sq.ft.) 


Floor area (sq. ft.) 


40 


768 


Not Permitted 


40 


768 


Not Permitted 


40 


768 


Not Permitted 


25 


768 


500 
450** 


5 


Not Permitted 


Not Permitted 


5 


Not Permitted 


Not Permitted 


10 


Not Permitted 


Not Permitted 



* See Section 6.3.4 

** 450 sq. ft. required for Housing 
for the Elderly 

6.3.1 Any maximum height permitted in this Bylaw shall 
be further subject to the restrictions of the Medfield 
Building Code and shall not apply to: 

6.3.1 a. Community facility and public utility structures, 
provided that the side and rear yards or setbacks 
required in the district for the highest permitted 
principal structure shall be increased 2 feet in 
width for each foot by which the height of such 
structure exceeds the height permitted in the dis- 
trict. 

6.3.1 b. Necessary appurtenant structures such as church 
spire, belfry, cupola, dome, smokestack, monument, 
derrick, conveyor, flagpole, radio or television tower, 
mast, antenna, aerial, airplane hangar, roof tank, 
building service equopment, roof structure other 
than a penthouse, chimney or parapet wall, or any 
similar appurtenance provided that any such struc- 
ture shall be set back from the vertical plane of the 
required setback building line one foot horizontally 
for each two feet that the height of such structure 
exceeds the height permitted in the district. 

6.3.1 c. Special industrial structure; such as a cooling 
tower, grain elevator, sugar refinery, gas holder or 
other similar structure where the industrial pro- 
cess requires a greater height, provided that any 
such structure shall not occupy more than 15 per- 



188 



cent of the lot area and shall be not less than 50 
feet from any lot line. 

6.3.2 A fence, hedge, wall or other enclosure may be main- 
tained on a corner lot, provided that it shall not ob- 
struct visual clearance at intersecting streets by being 
between 3V 2 feet and 10 feet above the grade within 
the triangular area formed by the intersection of the 
curb lines and a straight line joining said curb 
lines at points which are 25 feet measured from 
the intersection of the curb lines. Where curbs do not 
exist, the lines shall be where such curb would be re- 
quired if built. 

6.3.3 A basement or cellar, to be inhabited, must have the 
ceiling not less than five (5) feet above the average 
elevation of the land immediately surrounding the 
building foundation wall. 

6.3.4 Where four (4) stories are built, only three (3) stories 
may be inhabited. 

SECTION 8 

OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

8.1 OFF-STREET PARKING AND/OR LOADING REQUIRE- 
MENTS 

In any district, if the use of any structure constructed, enlarged, 
or extended and any use of land established, or any existing use 
is changed, after the effective date of this Bylaw, parking and 
loading spaces shall be provided in accordance with the follow- 
ing tables. A structure enlarged or a use extended after the 
effective date of this Bylaw shall be required to provide loading 
spaces in accordance with the following Table of Off-Street 
Parking Standards (See the Table of Off-Street Parking Stand- 
ards which is declared to be a part of this Bylaw) for the entire 
structure or use unless the increase in units or measurements 
amounts to less than 15 percent maximum as a whole whether 
such increase occurs at one time or in successive stages. 

8.2 GENERAL PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

8.2.1 Accessory parking or loading spaces being maintained 
in any district in connection with any existing use 
on the effective date of this Bylaw shall hereafter be 
maintained so long as said use remains, unless an 
equivalent number of parking or loading spaces is 
constructed elsewhere conforming to the requirements 
of the above tables, provided: these regulations shall 
not require the maintenance of more parking or 
loading spaces than is required according to the tables. 

189 



8.2.2 When units or measurements determining number of 
required parking or loading spaces result in a require- 
ment of a fractional space, any fraction over one- 
half shall require one parking or loading space. 

8.2.3 Off-street parking spaces required hereunder shall be 
provided either on the same premises with the parking 
generator, or on any premises associated therewith; 
provided, however, that the walking distance between 
the farthest point of the parking area and the main 
pedestrian entrance to the building or use in question 
shall not exceed five hundred (500) feet, except that 
in the case of parking space for employees only, the 
distance may be increased to eight hundred (800) feet. 



8.1 



TABLE OF OFF-STREET PARKING STANDARDS 



Use 



Dwelling 



Lodging house, motel 
or hotel 

Retail, service, finance, 
insurance or real estate 
establishment 

Wholesale establishment 



Manufacturing or indus- 
trial establishment 

Auditorium, stadium, 
theatre, church or other 
places of assemblage 

Hospitals, sanatoriums 
or nursing homes 

Housing for Elderly 

Medical offices and 
clinics 

School or college 



Number of Parking Spaces 
per Unit 

Two per unit 

One and one-half per rental unit 

One per each 75 square feet of net floor 
space 

One per each 300 square feet of net floor 
space 

One per each 1000 square feet of net floor 
space 

One space for each four seats therein to be 
based on the maximum seating capacity 

Two per bed at design capacity 

One fourth per unit 

Five spaces for each doctor having office 
space therein 

Two per classroom in an elementary and 
junior high school and four per classroom 
in a senior high school plus spaces needed 
above for auditorium or gymnasium 
whichever has the larger capacity 



190 



Business, community One per 300 square feet or fraction there- 

facility (church, town of of net floor space 

building, recreation, etc.) 
or public utility establishment 

Restaurants, night clubs One space for each 50 square feet of floor 

or eating places area 

Bowling alley Seven spaces for each bowling lane 

Barber shop, beauty Two spaces for each chair installed, and 

parlor One space for each two operators 

Self-service dry cleaners One space for each two machines installed, 

and self-service laundries including dryers 

Gasoline and service Two spaces for each service bay 

stations 

8.2 GENERAL PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

8.2.1 Accessory parking or loading spaces being maintained 
in any district in connection with any existing use 
on the effective date of this Bylaw shall hereafter be 
maintained so long as said use remains, unless an 
equivalent number of parking or loading spaces is 
constructed elsewhere conforming to the requirements 
of the above tables, provided: these regulations shall 
not require the maintenance of more parking or load- 
ing spaces than is required according to the tables. 

8.2.2 When units or measurements determining number of 
required parking or loading spaces result in a require- 
ment of a fractional space, any fraction over one- 
half shall require one parking or loading space. 

8.2.3 Off-street parking spaces required hereunder shall be 
provided either on the same premises with the park- 
ing generator, or on any premises associated there- 
with; provided, however, that the walking distance 
between the farthest point of the parking area and 
the main pedestrian entrance to the building or use 
in question shall not exceed five hundred (500) feet, 
except that in the case of parking space for employ- 
ees only, the distance may be increased to eight hun- 
dred (800) feet. 

8.2.4 Where required parking spaces are provided away 
from the lot on which the use, other structure, or lot 
they are intended to serve is located, such spaces shall 
be in the same possession, either by deed or long-term 
lease, as the property occupied by the use, structure or 
lot to which the parking spaces are accessory. 



191 



8.2.5 The loading spaces required for the uses listed in the 
above table shall in all eases be on the same lot as the 
use they are intended to serve. In no case shall the 
required loading spaces be part of the area used to 
satisfy the parking requirements of this Bylaw. 

8.2.6 No accessory off-street parking shall be permitted 
within the required front yard or side yard in any "R" 
District, except in a legal service driveway. 

8.2.7 For any use not enumerated in this section, the re- 
quired off-street parking facilities shall be determined 
by a unit of floor area or number of employees or 
some other unit measurement as specified by the 
Building Inspector with the advice of the Planning 
Board, which shall be guided in its determination by 
the requirements of this section applicable to com- 
parable uses. 

8.2.8 Where differing uses occur on a single parcel of land, 
the off-street parking facilities to be provided in re- 
spect of such parcel shall be aggregate of the require- 
ments under this section for each such use. 

8.3 PARKING AND LOADING SPACE STANDARDS 

All parking or loading areas containing over five spaces, includ- 
ing automobile service and drive-in establishments, shall be 
either contained within structures, or subject to the following: 

8.3.1 The area shall be effectively screened on each side 
which adjoins or faces the side or rear lot line of a lot 
situated in any "R" District. The screening shall con- 
sist of that required for buffers as specified in Section 
6, paragraphs 6.2.8 and 6.2.9. The screening required 
by the subsection shall be set back from each street 
the same as if it were a main building wall. 

8.3.2 The area and access driveways thereto shall be sur- 
faced with a durable and dustless material and shall be 
graded and drained so as to dispose of all surface water 
accumulation. 

8.3.3 A substantial bumper of masonry, steel, heavy timber 
or concrete curb stop shall be placed at the edge of 
surfaced areas except driveways in order to protect 
abutting structures, properties and sidewalks. 

8.3.4 Any fixture used to illuminate any area shall be so ar- 
ranged as to direct the light away from the street and 
away from adjoining premises used for residential 
purposes. 



192 



8.3.5 Any repair or service facility for use by vehicles such 
as gas, oil, or water shall not be less than 25 feet from 
any lot line. 

8.3.6 Any parking area shall also be subject to the following: 

8.3.6 a. There shall not be any motor vehicle parked with- 

in 5 feet of any front side or rear lot line. 

8.3.6 b. There shall not be any vehicle repair facilities or 
any repair made to any vehicles. 

8.3.6 c. There shall not be any storage of material, or 
equipment. 

8.3.6 d. Except for driveways, parking shall not be located 
within the required front yard area in any "R" 
District. 

8.3.6 e. Parking and loading spaces shall be so arranged as 
not to permit backing of automobiles onto any 
street. 

8.3.6 f. Any portion of any entrance or exit driveway to the 
area shall not be closer to an intersecting street 
than 150 feet. No more than two driveways shall 
serve any one area. 

8.3.6 g. Any two driveways leading from a street to a single 
area shall not be within 50 feet of each other at 
their intersections with the front lot line. 

8.3.6 h. Any entrance or exit driveway shall not exceed 20 
feet in width, except for a suitable radius of curva- 
ture at the entrance. All entrance and exit drive- 
ways in "B" and "I" Districts shall be one way. 



SECTION 9 
. NONCONFORMING USES, STRUCTURES AND LOTS 

9.1 NONCONFORMITY BY INITIAL ENACTMENT OR 
AMENDMENT 

The provisions of this Section affecting nonconforming uses, 
structures and/or lots cited herein and certain related noncon- 
formities shall apply under the provisions of the Bylaw and 
established districts as enacted initially or as subsequently 
amended. 

9.2 EXTENSION AND ALTERATION 

9.2.1 Any nonconforming use except primarily for agricul- 
ture, horticulture or floriculture, or a portion of any 



193 



open space on a lot outside a structure shall not be 
extended. 

9.2.2 Any nonconforming use except primarily for agricul- 
ture, horticulture, or floriculture, or a lot not occupied 
by a structure shall not be extended. 

9.2.3 Any nonconforming principal use of a structure shall 
not be extended. 

9.2.4 Any conforming principal use of a nonconforming 
structure my be extended throughout the existing 
structure. 

9.2.5 Any nonconforming accessory use of a portion of a 
structure or any conforming accessory use of a portion 
of a nonconforming structure may be extended up to 
a maximum of 40 percent of the floor area of the 
existing structure. 

9.2.6 Any nonconforming structure located in any "R" Dis- 
trict, may be altered and the use, if conforming, may 
be extended throughout the altered portion provided: 
any conforming use shall not be made nonconforming; 
and any resultant alteration shall not cause the struc- 
ture to violate the maximum floor area ratio and yard 
regulations of the District in which it is located. 

9.2.7 Any nonconforming structure or portion thereof which 
has come into conformity shall not again become non- 
conforming. 

9.3 RESIDENTIAL LOT OF RECORD 

Any nonconforming lot lawfully laid out by plan or deed duly 
recorded or any nonconforming lot shown on a plan endorsed 
by the Planning Board with the words "approval under the 
subdivision control law not required" or words of similar im- 
port which complies at the time of recording or such endorse- 
ment whichever is earlier with the minimum area, frontage, 
width and depth requirements, of any of the zoning bylaws then 
in effect may be built upon provided it is in accordance with 
the Zoning Enabling Act and all other requirements of this 
Bylaw. 

9.4 REDUCTION OR INCREASE 

9.4.1 Any nonconforming lot or open space on the lot (yards, 
setbacks, courts, usable open space, or floor larea ratio) 
if already smaller or greater, as the case may be than 
that required shall not be further reduced or increased 
so as to be in greater nonconformity. 



194 



9.4.2 Any nonconforming off-street parking or loading spaces, 
if already less than the number required to serve their 
intended use shall not be further reduced in number. 

9.5 CHANGE 

9.5.1 Any nonconforming use of a structure may not be 
changed to another nonconforming use. 

9.5.2 Any nonconforming use which has been once changed 
to a permitted use shall not again be changed to an- 
other nonconforming use. 

9.5.3 Any nonconforming lot which has come into conformity 
shall not again be changed to a nonconforming lot. 

9.6 RESTORATION 

9.6.1 Any nonconforming structure damaged less than 50% 
by fire or other cause may be rebuilt if in accordance 
with the Area and Yard Regulations of this Bylaw. 
Such a nonconforming use will require a new variance. 

9.6.2 Any conforming structure damaged more than 50% by 
fire or other cause located on a nonconforming lot as 
described in paragraph 9.3 of this Bylaw may be re- 
stored or rebuilt. No such restoration or rebuilding 
shall be permitted which otherwise changes the use 
or structure to a nonccnforming use. 

9.7 ABANDONMENT 

Any nonconforming use, except for agriculture, horticulture or 
floriculture use, or a structure and/or lot which has been aban- 
doned for a continuous period of one year or more shall not be 
used again except by a conforming use. 

9.8 MOVING 

Any nonconforming structure shall not be moved to any other 
location on the lot or any other lot unless every portion of such 
structure, the use thereof and the lot shall be conforming. 

9.9 UNSAFE STRUCTURE 

Any structure determined by the Building Inspector to be un- 
safe may be restored to a safe condition, provided such work 
on any nonconforming structure shall not place it in greater 
nonconformity, and provided, further if the cost to restore any 
structure shall exceed 50 percent of its physical replacement 
value, it shall be reconstructed only as a conforming structure 
and used only for a conforming use unless a new variance is 
secured. 



195 



SECTION 10 
FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT 

10.1 PURPOSE 

The purpose of this section is to promote: 

a. The health and safety of the occupants of lands subject to 
seasonal or periodic flooding in the Charles and Stop Rivers 
Flood Plain District. 

b. The preservation of the natural flood control characteristics 
and the water storage capacity of the Flood Plain District. 

c. The safety and purity of water; control and containment of 
sewage; safety of gas, electric, fuel and other utilities from 
breaking, leaking, shortcircuiting, grounding, igniting, elec- 
trocuting or any other dangers due to flooding. 

10.2 DEFINITION 

The Flood Plain District is superimposed over any other district 
established by this Bylaw. The Flood Plain District is defined 
as all lands along or sloping to the Stop River and Charles River 
whose elevation is below 125 feet Mean Sea Level based on the 
Massachusetts Geodetic Datum of 1929 and as shown on the 
Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield. 

10.3 USE 

10.3.1 Land in the Flood Plain District may be used for any 
purpose otherwise permitted in the underlying district 
except that: 

10.3.1.1 No building, wall, dam or other structure shall 
be erected, constructed, altered, enlarged or 
otherwise created or moved for any purpose 
unless a Special Permit from the Board of 
Appeals is issued. 

10.3.1.2 Dumping, filling, excavating or transferring of 
any earth material within the District is pro- 
hibited unless a Special Permit from the Board 
of Appeals is issued. 

10.3.1.3 No ponds or pools shall be created or other 
changes in water courses, for swimming, fish- 
ing or other recreational uses, agricultural 
uses, scenic features or drainage improvements 
or any other uses unless a Special Permit from 
the Board of Appeals is issued. 

10.3.2 Proper operation and maintainence of dams and other 
water control devices are permitted uses under this 

196 



section. This includes the temporary alteration of the 
water level for emergency or maintenance purposes 
and the removal of any and all flashboards of a private- 
ly-owned dam in order to lower the water level. 

10.3.3 Municipal use, such as waterworks, pumping stations 
and parks, is permitted under this section. 

10.4 APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL PERMIT 

10.4.1 Any person desiring a Special Permit for any use set 
out in Section 10.3.1 above within the Flood Plain Dis- 
trict shall submit an application to the Board of 
Appeals, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
40A of the Massachusetts General Laws as amended, 
and a copy thereof to the Building Inspector. The appli- 
cation shall be accompanied by plans of any construc- 
tion and of the premises on which it is to be situated. 
All plans shall show existing and proposed finished 
ground contours at two-foot intervals. Contours shall 
be delineated within 200 feet of the proposed con- 
struction. 

10.4.2 Copies of the application for Special Permit to the 
Board of Appeals with accompanying plans shall also 
be sent to the Building Inspector, Board of Health and 

..._••. Planning Board for their recommendations to the 

Board of Appeals, as to their approval, disapproval or 
appropriate recommendations. 

10.4.3 All such plans shall be certified by a Registered Land 
Surveyor or a Registered Professional Civil Engineer. 

10.5 ISSUANCE OF SPECIAL PERMITS 

10.5.1 The Board of Appeals, after holding a public hearing, 
shall issue a permit under this section if it finds that 
the use of the premises will not endanger the health 
or safety of the occupants thereof or of other land 
in the Flood Plain District. In deciding applications for 
a Special Permit under this section, but without limit- 
ing the generality of the foregoing, the Board of Ap- 
peals shall assure: 

10.5.1.1 That the basement floor elevation for any 
structure having sustained living occupancy 
shall be at least 125 feet above Mean Sea 
Level, and the top of the foundation wall shall 
be at least 132 feet above Mean Sea Level. 

10.5.1.2 That structures be so designed and secured 
that during flooding: 

a. The foundation would not be undermined. 



197 



b. The structure will not be floated off, bat- 
tered off or swept away. 

10.5.1.3 That safe vehicular and pedestrian movement 
to, over and from the premises is provided on 
ways having a profile no less than 125 feet 
above Mean Sea Level. 

10.5.1.4 That because of the location or elevation of 
the building, filling of the area, or for other 
reasons, there will be no danger of pollution to 
public or onsite water facilities. 

10.5.1.5 That the containment of sewage; safety of gas, 
electric, fuel and other utilities from breaking, 
leaking, shortcircuiting, grounding, igniting, 
electrocuting or any other dangers due to flood- 
ing will be adequately protected. 

10.5.1.6 That the methods of drainage are adequate. 

10.5.1.7 That other land in the Flood Plain District is 
protected against detrimental or offensive uses 
of the premises. 

10.5.2 If any land included in the Flood Plain District is 
found by the Board of Appeals not in fact to be subject 
to seasonal or periodic flooding, the Board of Appeals 
may grant a Special Permit for the use of such land 
for any purpose permitted in the underlying district. 

10.5.3 No building permit shall be issued until the Board of 
Health has issued a permit under this section approving 
the proposed sanitary and storm drainage system or 
has allowed forty-five (45) days to elapse after the 
receipt of the application. 

10.5.4 No occupancy permit shall be issued until the Board of 
Appeals, the Building Inspector, the Board of Health 
and the Planning Board have received a certified plan 
showing the foundation and floor elevations, grading 
of the premises, elevations of the completed construc- 
tion and all elevations of the various elements that 
make up the sewage disposal system, and that all re- 
quirements of all permits are satisfied. 

10.5.5 In consideration of any of the items under "Section 
10.5 — Issuance of Special Permits," the Board of 
Health and the Board of Appeals shall consider the 
minimum ground water level in the Flood Plain District 
to be 125 feet above Mean Sea Level, unless data indi- 
cates a higher ground water level. 



198 



10.6 LIMITS OF AUTHORITY 

Nothing contained in this Section 10 shall limit the authority of 
the Board of Health with respect to premises in the Flood Plain 
District or limit the applicability of the Medfield Building Code 
to any structure in the Flood Plain District. 



SECTION 11 

WATERSHED PROTECTION DISTRICT 

11.1 PURPOSE 

The purpose of this section is : 

a. To preserve and protect the streams and ether water courses 
in the Town of Medfield and their adjoining lands. 

b. To protect the health and safety of persons and property 
against the hazards of flooding and contamination. 

c. To preserve and maintain the ground water table for water 
supply purposes. 

d. To protect the community against the detrimental use and 
development of lands adjoining such water courses. 

e. To conserve the watershed areas of the Town of Medfield 
for the health, safety and welfare of the public. 

11.2 DEFINITION 

11.2.1 The Watershed Protection District is superimposed 
over any other district established by this Bylaw. The 
Watershed Protection District is defined as all land area 
along the streams and brooks for a horizontal distance 
of at least 25 feet on each side of the centerline there- 
of and adjacent low, marshy areas, as shown on the 
Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield. The names of 
the brooks included within the District are as follows: 
Great Pond Brook, Horse Brook, Mill Brook, Mine 
Brook, North Brook, Saw Mill Brook, Sewall Brook, 
South Plain Brook, Tubwreek Brook, Turtle Brook "A" 
through "J" inclusive as shown on the Zoning Map of 
the Town of Medfield. 

11.2.2 The Watershed Protection District shall include all 
land that lies within a horizontal distance of 25 feet 
from the normal high water line of the following 
major water bodies: Baker's Pond, Cemetery Pond, 
Chickering Lake, Danielson Pond, Echo Lake, Flynn's 
Pond, Holt's Pond, Jewell's Pond, June Pond, Kings- 
bury's Pond, Little Chickering Lake, North Pond, 



199 



Parker's Pond and all other ponds that are shown on 
the Zoning Map of the Town of Medfield. 

11.3 USE 

l" 

11.3.1 Land in the Watershed Protection District may be 

used for any purpose otherwise permitted in the un- 
derlying district except that: 

11.3.1.1 No building, wall, dam or other structure shall 
be erected, constructed, altered, enlarged or 
otherwise created or moved for any purpose 
unless a Special Permit from the Board of 
Appeals is issued. 

11.3.1.2 Dumping, filling, excavating or transferring 
of any earth materials within the District is 
prohibited unless a Special Permit from the 
Board of Appeals is issued. 

r 

11.3.1.3 No ponds or pools shall be created or other 
changes in water courses, for swimming, fish- 
ing or other recreational uses, agricultural 
uses, scenic features or drainage improvements 
or any other uses unless a Special Permit from 
the Board of Appeals is issued. . 

11.3.2 Proper operation and maintenance of dams and other 
water control devices are permitted uses under this 
section. This includes the temporary alteration of the 
water level for emergency or maintenance purposes 
and the removal of any and all flashboards of a pri- 
vately-owned dam in order to lower the water level. 

11.3.3 Municipal use, such as waterworks, pumping stations 
and parks, is permitted under this section. 

11.4 APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL PERMIT 

11.4.1 Any person desiring a Special Permit for any use set 
out in Section 11.3.1 above within the Watershed Pro- 
tection District shall submit an application to the Board 
of Appeals, in accordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws as amended, 
and a copy thereof to the Building Inspector. The 
application shall be accompanied by plans of any con- 
struction and of the premises on which it is to be situ- 
ated. All plans shall show existing and proposed finished 
ground contours at two-foot intervals. Contours shall 
be delineated within 200 feet of the proposed construc- 
tion. 



200 



11.4.2 " Copies ' of the application for Special Permit to the 

Board of Appeals with accompanying plans shall also 
be sent to the Building Inspector, Board of Health and 
the Planning Board for their recommendations to the 
Board of Appeals, as to their approval, disapproval or 
appropriate recommendations. 

11.4.3 All such plans shall be certified by a Registered Land 
Surveyor or a Registered Professional Civil Engineer. 

11.5 ISSUANCE OF SPECIAL PERMITS 

11.5.1 The Board of A_ppeals, after holding a public hearing, 
shall issue a Special Permit under this section if it 
finds that the use of the premises will not endanger 
the health or safety of the occupants thereof or of 
other land in the Watershed Protection District. In de- 
ciding applications for a Special Permit under this sec- 
tion, but without limiting the generality of the fore- 
going, the Board of Appeals shall assure: 

11.5.1.1 That the basement floor elevation for any 
structure having sustained living occupancy 
shall be at least two feet above the elevation 
of the adjacent Watershed Protection Dis- 
trict and that the top of the foundation wall 
shall be at least nine feet above the elevation 
of the adjacent District. 

11.5.1.2 That structures be so designed and secured 
that during flooding: 

a. The foundation would not be undermined. 

b. The structure will not be floated off, bat- 
tered off or swept away. 

11.5.1.3 That safe vehicular and pedestrian movement 
to, over and from the premises is provided on 
ways having a profile no less than two feet 
above the elevation of the adjacent District. 

11.5.1.4 That because of the location or elevation of 
the building flooding, filling of the area, or for 
other reasons, there will be no danger of pollu- 
tion to public or onsite water facilities. 



11.5.1.5 That the containment of sewage; .safety of 
gas, electric, fuel and other utilities from 
breaking, leaking, shortcircuiting, grounding, 
igniting, electrocuting or any other dangers 
due to flooding will be adequately protected. 

11.5.1.6 That the methods of drainage are adequate. 



201 



11.5.1.7 That other land in the Watershed Protection 
District is protected against detrimental or 
offensive uses of the premises. 

11.5.2 No building permit shall be issued until the Board of 
Health has issued a permit under this section approv- 
ing the proposed sanitary and storm drainage system 
or has allowed forty-five (45) days to elapse after re- 
ceipt of the application. 

11.5.3 No occupancy permit shall be issued until the Board 
of Appeals, the Building Inspector, the Board of Health 
and the Planning Board have received a certified plan 
showing the foundation and floor elevations, grading 
of the premises, elevations of the completed construc- 
tion and all elevations of the various elements that 
make up the sewage disposal system, and that all re- 
quirements of all permits are satisfied. 

11.5.4 In consideration of any of the items under "Section 
11.5 — Issuance of Special Permits," the Board of 
Health and the Board of Appeals shall consider the 
minimum ground water level in the Watershed Protec- 
tion District to be two feet less than the elevation 
above Mean Sea Level of the adjacent District, unless 
data indicates a higher ground water level. 

11.6 AREAS AND YARD REGULATIONS 

The portion of any lot in a Watershed Protection District may 
be used to meet the area and yard regulations for the District 
in which the remainder of the lot is situated provided that not 
more than 75% of the lot area is within the Watershed Protec- 
tion District. 

11.7 WATER BODIES 

All water bodies encircled by the Watershed Protection District 
are hereby included within said District. 

11.8 LIMITS OF AUTHORITY 

Nothing contained in this Section 11 shall limit the authority 
of the Board of Health with respect to premises in the Water 
shed Protection District or limit the applicability of the Med- 
fleld Building Code to any structure in the Watershed Protec- 
tion District. 



202 



SECTION 12 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

GOVERNING EARTH REMOVAL USES 

12.1 REMOVAL 

12.1.1 The removal of earth from all zoning districts of the 
Town of Medfield shall be permitted only after special 
permission of the Board of Selectmen and under these 
rules and regulations. The Board of Selectmen shall 
grant no such permit as would in their opinion ad- 
versely affect the scheme of growth laid down in the 
Zoning Bylaw or elsewhere, or the economic status of 
the town, or tend to impair the beauty of the town, 
or of the district most immediately affected, or develop 
health or other hazards. 

12.2 APPLICATION 

12.2.1 All applications for approval or endorsement for the 
removal of earth in the Town of Medfield shall be 
made in accordance with the rules and regulations here- 
inafter set forth. 

12.2.2 Before an applicant can obtain a permit for the pur- 
pose of removing earth in the Town of Medfield, he 
shall present to the Board of Selectmen an original 
and five copies of a plan made by a Registered En- 
gineer or Registered Land Surveyor, which shall show 
in detail the following information: 

12.2.2 a. All the property where earth is to be removed 
with all boundaries shown in detail. 

12.2.2 b. All buildings on said property and buildings within 
one hundred feet of said property lines. 

12.2.2 c. All adjacent roads, their elevations, and established 
grades. 

12.2.2 d. All adjacent waterways, brooks, swamps and their 
elevations. 

12.2.2 e. Contour lines for the entire property at two-foot 
intervals showing existing and proposed elevations. 

12.2.2 f. Any and all easements existing and proposed, pub- 
lic or private. 

12.2.2 g. Any and all benchmarks. 

12.2.2 h. All land shall be divided into five acre grids. 



203 



SITE PLAN 

The plan shall be drawn to a scale of 1" equals 40'. All profiles 
shall be drawn to a scale of 1" equals 8'. 

The Board of Seectmen after study may make such corrections 
and revisions as it deems advisable in the public interest. 

12.4 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

In approving the plan, the Board of Selectmen will require that 
the land shall be suitable for the removal of earth without danger 
to health and life and that proper steps are taken so as not to 
hinder or endanger traffic on public ways. The Board of Select- 
men may require, at its discretion, that police control of the 
traffic be provided by the applicant at his expense. Only under 
special circumstances will the Board of Selectmen approve a 
plan for the removal of earth where intentions are shown for ex- 
cavation below an already existing public way. 

12.5 PROCEDURE 

The Board of Selectmen will act upon application for approval 
of earth removal only when proper plans have been submitted 
with all information that is required clearly shown. 
Before approval is granted, a public hearing shall be held by 
the Board of Selectmen, notices of which shall be sent by cer- 
tified or registered mail with return receipt to mortgagees, if 
any, of the applicant's property and to all owners of property 
as appearing on the most recent tax list, any part of which lies 
within one hundred feet of the property of the applicant. 

12.6 PUBLICATION AND NOTICES 

12.6.1 The applicant shall arrange and pay for such publi- 
cations and notices and shall deliver a list of said mort- 
gagees, property owners, return receipts, and a copy 
of the paper containing the notice of the hearing to 
the Clerk of the Board of Selectmen at least twenty- 
four hours prior to the hearing. 

12.6.2 The notice shall appear in a paper of general circula- 
tion within the Town, once in each of two successive 
weeks, the first publication at least fourteen (14) days 
before the day of the hearing. 

12.6.3 The word "applicant" as used in these rules and regu- 
lations shall mean the owner of the property or his 
legal representative or persons authorized by owner. 

12.6.4 Corporations shall file with the Board of Selectmen 
a list of their officers and designate their authority to 
sign legal documents. 



204 



12.7 -BOND 

12.7.1 Before approval of any plan, and in order to insure 
the fulfillment of the following requirements, the 
Board of Selectmen will require a proper bond, depo- 
sits of money, or negotiable securities on a scale of not 
less than five hundred dollars per acre, the exact 
amount to be set by the Board of Selectmen. 

12.7.2 Said bond or security to be held by the Town of Med- 
field until all requirements of the Specifications have 
been complied with. The Board of Selectmen shall be 
the agent to enforce compliance with these rules and 
regulations, and upon satisfactory completion will re- 
lease the security. 

12.7.3 Only under exceptional circumstances will any appli- 
cant be allowed to work more than one five-acre grid 
at any one time. 

12.8 SPECIFICATIONS 

12.8.1 All work shall be done in accordance with the fol- 
lowing specifications : 

12.8.1 a. Trees are to be cut (not bulldozed). 

12.8.1 b. All trees, brush and stumps are to be chipped on 
the site, unless removed for commercial purposes. 
DISPOSAL BY BURNING IS NOT PERMITTED. 

12.8.1 c. All loam and subsoil must be bulldozed into piles 
for future respreading. No loam or subsoil may be 
removed from the property. 

12.8.1 d. Earth may be removed only to contours as speci- 
fied by the Board of Selectmen. In earth removal 
areas, ledge shall not be left exposed above the 
approved grade and boulders, when encountered, 
shall be buried at least such that their tops are six 
feet below the approved grade and in the event 
that ledge is encountered prior to reaching the ap- 
proved grade, a revision of the approved grade plan 
must be immediately obtained. 

12.8.1 e. After the earth has been removed from the first 
five-acre grid, and before proceeding to the next 
five-acre grid, excavation shall be graded to the ap- 
proved grade and all loam and subsoil shall then be 
respread over the excavation, except in such areas 
as are required in subsequent operations. 



205 



12.8.1 f. Rye grass shall be seeded on this reloamed area 
at the rate of two-hundred pounds per acre. 

12.8.1 g. Fingerling fir or other approved trees shall be 
planted over the entire area, five to six feet on 
centers. 

12.8.1 h. Upon completion and approval by the Board of 
Selectmen a five-acre grid, the security may be re- 
leased in part or in whole or it may be advanced 
to the next grid. 

12.9 REMOVAL OF EARTH NOT INTENDED FOR BUSINESS 

12.9.1 Removal of earth which is not intended as a busi- 
ness but for the improvement of a person's property 
and does not include large acreage, will be allowed on 
a weekly permit upon such conditions and terms as 
specified by the Board of Selectmen. This type of per- 
mit must be renewed every seven days at a time and 
place set by the Board of Selectmen. 

12.9.2 In every case, whether it be a large or small earth 
removal operation if any violation occurs, the permit 
shall be revoked forthwith and will not be renewed 
until the violation has been corrected to the satisfac- 
tion of the Board of Selectmen. 

12.9.3 These rules and regulations governing earth removal 
uses in the Town of Medfield shall not apply to opera- 
tions that were in progress and operated on land 
owned by the applicant prior to April 9, 1938, except 
that the final grade of the land shall be approved by 
the Board of Selectmen immediately upon the approval 
of this Bylaw. 

12.9.4 The Board of Selectmen shall designate authority to 
inspect the earth removal operations under these rules 
and regulations. 

12.9.5 The Board of Selectmen shall reserve the right to 
limit the days and hours of operation and may require 
antidust treatment in those areas that in the Board 
of Selectmen's opinion require such treatment. 

12.9.6 The Board of Selectmen may also require additional 
surety to cover the cost of drainage to existing town 
roadways or clean-up requirements caused by the earth 
removal operation. 



206 



SECTION 13 
ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT 

13.1 BUILDING INSPECTOR AND/OR ZONING ENFORCMENT 

OFFICER 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Selectmen, who may ap- 
point an agent, the Building Inspector and/or Zoning Enforc- 
ing Officer, to administer and enforce the provision of this 
Bylaw. 

13.2 PERMIT REQUIRED 

It shall be unlawful for any owner or person to erect, con- 
struct, reconstruct, or alter a structure or change the use, 
increase the intensity of use, or extend or displace the use of 
any building, other structure or lot without applying for and 
receiving from the Building Inspector and/or Zoning Enforc- 
ing Officer the required permit therefor. For purposes of ad- 
ministration such permit and application procedure involving 
a structure may be made at the same time and combined 
with the permit required under the Building Code. Where the 
application does not involve a structure, but only a lot, a 
permit shall be applied for and may be issued. In addition to 
complete plot plans and drawings required for submission by 
the Medfield Building Code (prepared and certified to be a 
professional engineer and/or land surveyor), plans and in- 
formation for signs and off-street parking and loading shall 
also be filed with the Building Inspector. An application for 
a permit in the Flood Plain or Watershed Protection Dis- 
tricts shown on the Zoning Map shall meet all requirements 
of Sections 10 and 11. 

13.3 PREVIOUSLY APPROVED PERMITS 

The status of previously approved permits shall be as deter- 
mined by the Zoning Enabling Act. 

13.4 CERTIFICATE OF USE AND OCCUPANCY REQUIRED 

It shall be unlawful to use or occupy any structure or lot for 
which a permit is required herein without the owner applying 
for and receiving from %he Building Inspector a certificate of 
use and occupancy. 

13.5 PERMIT AND CERTIFICATE FEES 

Fees shall be established by the Board of Selectmen. 

13.6 SPECIAL PERMIT TIME LIMITS 

A building permit shall be applied for to the Building Inspector 
by the applicant for a special permit within 180 days of the date 
of authorization by the Board or the special permit will become 

207 



null and void. Any work for which any permit has been issued 
by the Building Inspector shall be actively prosecuted within 
90 days and completed within one year of the date of the is- 
suance of the special permit. Any special permit issued for a 
project which is actively prosecuted for one year may be ex- 
tended for up to an additional year at the discretion of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

13.7 VIOLATIONS 

The Building Inspector and/or Zoning Enforcing Officer shall 
serve a notice of "VIOLATION and ORDER" to any owner or 
person responsible for the erection, construction, reconstruc- 
tion, conversion, alteration of a structure or change in use, in- 
crease in intensity of use or extension or displacement of use 
of any structure or lot in violation of the provisions of the 
Bylaw or in violation of any approved plan, information certi- 
ficate issued under the provisions of this Bylaw, and such order 
shall direct the discontinuance of the unlawful action, use or 
condition and the abatement of violation within a time to be 
specified by the Building Inspector and/or Zoning Enforcing 
Officer. Any owner who having been served with a notice and 
who ceases any work or other activity, shall not leave any 
structure or lot in such condition as to be a hazard or menace 
to the public safety, health or general welfare. The Building 
Inspector shall have the power to require that such premises be 
put in such condition as he directs. 

13.8 PROSECUTION OF VIOLATION 

If the notice of "VIOLATION and ORDER" is not complied 
with promptly, the Building Inspector and/or Zoning Enforc- 
ing Officer, shall request the Board of Selectmen to institute the 
appropriate action or proceeding at law or in equity to prevent 
any unlawful action, use or condition to restrain, correct or 
abate such violation. 

13.9 BOARD OF APPEALS 

There shall be a Board of Appeals of three members and one 
associate member appointed as provided in Section 30 of Chap- 
ter 40 of the General Laws, as amended, which shall act on all 
matters within its jurisdiction under this Bylaw in the manner 
prescribed in said section, and subject always to the rule that 
it shall give due consideration to promoting the public health, 
safety, convenience, and welfare, and conserving property val- 
ues, that it shall permit no building or use injurious, noxious, 
offensive or detrimental to a neighborhood, and that it shall 
prescribe appropriate conditions and safeguards in each case. 



208 






13.10 SPECIAL PERMITS 

Certain uses, structures or conditions are designated as SP in 
Section 5, Paragraph 5.4 Table of Use Regulations, and else- 
where in this Bylaw. Upon application duly made to the Board, 
the Board may, in appropriate cases and subject to appropriate 
conditions and safeguards, grant a special permit for such ex- 
ceptions and no others. 

13.10.1 In action upon an application for a special permit 
the Board shall take into consideration whether: the 
specific site is an appropriate location for the use or 
structure; the adequacy of public sewerage and water 
facilities, or the suitability of soils for on-lot sewerage 
and water systems; the use developed will adversely 
affect the neighborhood; there will be undue nuisance 
or serious hazard to vehicles or pedestrians; and ade- 
quate and appropriate facilities will be provided to en- 
sure the proper operation of the proposed use, structure, 
or condition. The Board shall authorize such special per- 
mit only when it finds that, in view of these considera- 
tions, such special permit is consistent with the spirit 
of this Bylaw and generally in conformity with the 
Master Plan for the Town. 

13.10.2 The Board shall also impose the conditions specified 
below for the following uses : 

13.10.2 a. For the Planned Residential Development of land 
for any permitted use in any Residential District, 
provided the minimum distance between principal 
buildings shall be twice the minimum required side 
yard; and the minimum lot area required per 
dwelling unit or other permitted unit shall be mul- 
tiplied by the number of units to obtain the mini- 
mum lot area required for the total tract of the land. 

13.10.2 b. For the Open Area Residential Development of 
land for one-family residential purposes in any 
"R-T" and "R-E" District subject to area regula- 
tions less than the minimum required in the Table 
of Area Regulations provided: the tract in single or 
consolidated ownership at the time of application 
shall be at least 10 acres in size and subject to ap- 
proval by the Planning Board under the Subdivision 
Control Law; a development plan shall be presented 
for the entire tract ; each individual lot shall be sub- 
ject to all lot requirements for a one-family dwelling 
in an "R-S" District; the total number of proposed 
lots in the development shall not exceed the num- 



209 



i r of lots which could be developed under normal 
application requirements of the "R-T" or "R-E" 
District; the development shall be served by both 
public water and sewerage systems; at least 10 per- 
cent of the total tract area of which at least 50 
percent shall not be wetlands or over 5 percent slope 
land shall be set aside as commonland and may be 
either deeded to the town or covenanted to be main- 
tained as permanent "open space" in private or 
corporative nonprofit ownership; such common land 
shall be deeded to the town or permanently coven- 
anted simultaneously with the Planning Board's ap- 
proval of the Definitive Subdivision Plan; such com- 
mon land shall be restricted to open space uses such 
as tot lot, park, playground, playfield or conserva- 
tion area; and such common land shall have access 
to a street. 

13.10.2 c. For the use of a trailer located in any District 
provided; any trailer shall not be used for more 
than six months; no wheels, tires or other means of 
keeping the trailer mobile shall be removed; any 
trailer shall have a current state motor vehicle li- 
cense; and no skirts, porches, fences or similar ma- 
terials or equipment shall be added to any trailer 
which would detract from its mobility. Each trailer 
and its lot shall be subject to the requirements of 
the District. 

13.10.2 d. For the conversion or location of a lodging house 
in any "R-U" District, provided: it shall be limited 
to not more than five persons; it shall be located 
in the principal building; official residence shall be 
maintained therein by the owner of the premises; 
and it shall be used for non-transients only. 

13.10.2 e. For the use of a one-family dwelling in any "R" 
District for a home occupation, provided: not more 
than one nonresident shall be employed therein; not 
more than 500 square feet of floor area is devoted 
to such use; the use is carried on strictly within the 
principal building; not more than 40 percent of the 
existing floor area not to exceed 500 square feet is 
devoted to such use; that there shall be no display 
of goods or wares visible from the street; no adver- 
tising on the premises other than a small non- 
electrical sign not to exceed 1.5 square feet in area 
and carrying only the name and occupation of any 
occupant of the premises such as physician, artisan, 
teacher, (day-nurses), lawyer, architect, engineer, 



210 



clergyman, accountant, osteopath, dentist, and sim- 
ilar occupations or professions; and provided further 
that the buildings or premises occupied shall not be 
rendered objectionable or dertimental to the resi- 
dential character of the neighborhood due to the 
exterior appearance, emission of odor, gas, smoke, 
dust, noise, electrical disturbance or in any other 
way; and that such building shall include no feature 
of design not customary in buildings for residential 
use. Such uses as clinics, barber shops, beauty par- 
lors, tea rooms, real estate offices, tourist homes, 
animal hospitals, kennels, and others of a similar na- 
ture shall not be considered as home occupations. 

13.10.2 f. For the planned business or industrial development 
of land for any permitted use in "B" or "B-I" Dis- 
trict subject to a floor area ratio more than the 
maximum permitted in the Table of Area Regula- 
tions and less than the parking requirements con- 
tained in Section 8, provided; the tract in single or 
consolidated ownership at the time of application 
shall be at least three acres in size; a development 
plan shall be presented for the entire tract; the 
development shall be served by one common park- 
ing area, exit and entrance; the maximum floor area 
ratio shall not exceed 0.50; and the reduction in 
parking space requirements shall not exceed more 
than 10 percent those required under normal appli- 
cation requirements of the "B" or "B-I" District. 

13.10.2 g. For the manufacturing or other industrial use 
of any lot in any "I" District listed as an exception 
provided: the proposed use shall not emit any smoke 
of a shade darker than No. 2 on the Ringlemann 
Smoke Chart as published by the U.S. Bureau of 
Mines ; no air pollution particle concentrations shall 
exceed 0.3 grains per cubic foot; all inflammable or 
radioactive liquids shall be stored underground; the 
discharge of wastes shall be into a public sewer or 
the system subject to written approval of the Mass- 
achusetts Department of Public Health; vibration 
shall not exceed the safe range of Table 7, U.S. 
Bureau of Mines, Bulletin No. 442; there shall be no 
unusual or objectionable odor; and no direct or sky 
reflected glare shall be permitted; and further pro- 
vided all materials shall be stored within a com- 
pletely enclosed building. 

13.10.2 h. Use of land for, and/or the erection and use of 
any building and/or other structure in any District 



211 



for a principal and/ or accessory use where the 
provisions of this Bylaw cannot reasonably be in- 
terpreted to provide anywhere in this Bylaw for 
such use, provided the Board determines in each 
instance such use shall be essential to the general 
welfare of the Town, they shall be permitted only in 
a district where uses similar to the use shall be 
permitted; and the use shall be subject to all pro- 
visions prescribed in this Bylaw for the District 
in which the similar use is provided for as a per- 
mitted use. 

13.10.2 i. For the enlargement of any nonconforming struc- 
ture (not including a sign) beyond the maximum 
floor area ratio and yard regulations in any District, 
and the extension of the use thereof refer to Sec- 
tion 9. 

13.10.2 j. Alteration to single or multi-family residences so 
as to adapt them to additional limited multiple fam- 
ily use upon the following conditions: 

13.10.2 j. 1. That there will be no change in the existing 
district use and the approval shall automatical- 
ly cease when the structure is removed. 

13.10.2 j. 2. That a minimum floor space of five hundred 
(500) square feet per family unit be provided. 

13.10.2 j. 3. That satisfactory off-street parking must be 
provided. 

13.10.2 j. 4. That each family unit must be a complete 
houskeeping unit. 

13.10.2 j. 5. That additions or appurtenances may not be 
added without the prior approval of the Board 
of Appeals, except for openings for ingress and 
egress, for necessary stairs and steps including 
shelters therefor, and for the provisions of the 
housing of one motor vehicle per family unit. 

13.10.2 j. 6. And upon other conditions as may lawfully be 
required by the Board of Health, the Building, 
Plumbing and Wiring Inspectors, and the Board 
of Appeals, not inconsistent with the foregoing. 



13.11 VARIANCE 



The Board may authorize a variance for a particular use or 
parcel of land or to an existing building thereon from the terms 
of this Bylaw where, owing to conditions especially affecting 
such a building but not affecting generally the Zoning District 



212 



in which it is located, a literal enforcement of the provisions of 
this Bylaw would involve substantial hardship, financial or 
otherwise, to the appellant, and where desirable relief may be 
granted without substantial detriment to the public good and 
without nullifying or substantially derogating from the intent or 
purpose of this Bylaw. In authorizing such variance the Board 
may impose limitations both of time and use, such as, but not 
limited to those specified in Subsections 13.10.1 and 13.10.2 (a) 
to (j) inclusive, and a continuation of the use permitted may 
be conditioned upon compliance with regulations to be made and 
amended from time to time hereafter. 

13.12 SITE PLAN APPROVAL 

13.12.1 No single-family, multi-family, business or industrial 
building shall hereafter be erected or externally en- 
larged, and no business or industrial use shall hereafter 
be establshed or expanded in ground area except in 
conformity with a site plan bearing an endorsement of 
approval by the Building Inspector or the Building In- 
spector and the Board of Appeals. 

13.12.2 Said site plan shall show the following: 
13.12.2 a. Dimensions of the lot. 

13.12.2 b. All existing and proposed buildings and structures. 

13.12.2 c. Parking spaces, driveway opening, driveways, ser- 
vice areas, and other open road. 

13.12.2 d. Front, side and rear yard areas. 

13.12.2 e. All facilities for sewerage, refuse, and other waste 
disposal, and for surface water drainage. 

13.12.2 f. All landscape features, such as fences, walls, plant- 
ing areas and walks. 

13.12.2 g. Zoning district or boundary of zoning districts if 
lot extends into two or more districts. 

13.13 APPROVAL OF SITE PLAN 

Upon approval of the site plan, the builder may apply for a 
Building Permit under the appropriate section of the Building 
Code, Town of Medfield, Massachusetts. 

13.14 APPEAL PERIODS 

a. Any appeal to the Board of Appeals to any order or de- 
cision relative to this Bylaw shall be made within thirty 
(30) days of the date of the order or decision which is being 
appealed. All such appeals shall be conducted in accordance 
with the Zoning Enabling Act. 



213 



b. Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Board of Appeals 
may petition the courts within twenty-one (21) days and to 
higher courts In accordance with the Zoning Enabling Act. 

SECTION 14 
AMENDMENT, VALIDITY, REPEALER AND EFFECTIVE DATE 

14.1 AMENDMENT 

This Bylaw may be amended from time to time in accordance 
with the Zoning Enabling Act. 

During the amendment procedure subdivision plans in process 
of review by the Planning Board under the Subdivision Control 
Law shall be subject to the provisions of the Zoning Enabling 
Act. 

14.2 VALIDITY 

The invalidity, unconstitutionality or illegality of any provision 
of this Bylaw or boundary shown on the Zoning Map shall not 
have any effect upon the validity, constitutionality or legality of 
any other provisions or boundary. 

14.3 REPEALER 

The Zoning Bylaw for the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts, 
adopted on April 21, 1938, and all subsequent amendments there- 
to are repealed in whole. 

14.4 EFFECTIVE DATE 

This Bylaw shall take effect upon the date resulting from the 
procedure provided in Section 32 of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

NOTE: For simplicity, the effective date of the 
current amendment to the Medfield Zoning 
Bylaw shall be March 6, 1972. 

or take any other action relative thereto. (Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Zoning Bylaw 
a Section 7, Signs, or adopt as Article VIII of the general Bylaws the 
following: 

SIGNS 

7.1 PURPOSE 

This section is adopted for the regulation and restriction within 
the various zoning districts of the Town of Medfield of bill- 
boards, signs and other advertising devices on public ways or 
on private property within public view of a public way, public 



214 



park or reservation. This section shall not apply to signs ex- 
empted by Section 32 of Chapter 93 of the General Laws. 

7.2 REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 

7.2.1 "R" Districts 

7.2.1.1 Accessory Signs — No accessory sign shall be 
erected or maintained on any premises in con- 
nection with a use permitted in a residential 
area by the Zoning Bylaw, except as follows : 

7.2.1.1 a. One sign for each dwelling unit, provided: 
such sign shall not exceed 1.5 square feet 
in surface area; if lighted, it shall be il- 
luminated with white light by indirect 
method only, and it shall not be used other 
than for identifying the occupancy. It shall 
set back at least one half of the required 
depth of the front yard. 

7.2.1.1 b. One sign for each community facility or 
public utility use: provided the sign shall 
not exceed 12 square feet in surface area; 
if lighted, it shall be illuminated with white 
light by indirect method only; and it shall 
set back at least one half of the required 
depth of the front yard. 

7.2.1.1 c. One unlighted sign offering premises for 
sale or lease for each parcel in one owner- 
ship, provided: it shall not exceed 4 square 
feet in surface area; and it shall be set 
back at least one half of the required depth 
of the front yard. 

7.2.1.1 d. One unlighted temporary sign of a painter 
or other artisan erected during the period 
such person is performing work on such 
premises on which such sign is erected, 
provided: it shall not exceed 4 square feet 
in surface area; and it shall be set back 
at least one half of the required depth of 
the front yard. 

7.2.1.1 e. Accessory signs on premises lawfully being 
used for business or commercial purposes 
under a valid nonconforming use or vari- 
ance granted by the Board of Appeals 
must comply with the provisions of the 
Zoning Bylaw as to accessory signs in "B" 



215 



districts and such special conditions as the 
Board may require under Section 13. 

7.2.1.1 f. One sign for each hotel or multi-family 

use in a "R-U" district: provided the sign 
shall not exceed 12 square feet in surface 
area; if lighted, it shall be illuminated with 
white light by indirect method only, and 
it shall be set back at least one half of the 
required depth of the front yard. 

7.2.1.2 Nonaccessory Signs 

No nonaccessory sign shall be erected or main- 
tained in an "R" district. 

7.2.1.3 Special Signs 

Signs advertising subdivision shall be limited 
to one (1) sign per subdivision. Such a sign 
need not be on the property of the developer. 
The sign shall not exceed twelve (12) square 
feet in area and shall not be illuminated. A 
yearly permit for erection of the sign is re- 
quired and may be granted by the Board of 
Selectmen at their discretion. The Board may 
for any reason rescind the permit. 

7.2.2 "B" District or "B-I" District 

7.2.2.1 Accessory Signs 

Any sign shall be permitted that is permitted 
in the "R" district subject to the same provi- 
sions of use. Additionally, accessory signs that 
comply with the provisions hereinafter set 
forth are permitted. All other accessory signs 
are expressly prohibited. 

7.2.2.1 a. Location. The sign shall be affixed to a 
building except as herinafter provided. A 
sign attached to a building shall be securely 
affixed to one of the walls or a roof of the 
building. If affixed to a wall, it shall be 
parallel with and not project more than 
twelve (12) inches from the face of such 
wall and shall not project beyond the face 
of any other wall of the building. If affixed 
to the roof, it shall be parallel with the 
front wall of the store and shall not pro- 
ject beyond the face of any wall of the 
building. No sign, whether affixed to a wall 



216 



or roof of a building, shall project above 
the highest line of the main roof of the 
building, provided however, that if the sign 
is attached to a wall having a parapet ex- 
tending above the highest line of such roof, 
then the sign may reach but may not pro- 
ject above the top of the parapet wall. 

7.2.2.1 b. Size. A sign shall not be more than three 
(3) feet overall in height. A sign on the 
exterior wall of the first floor of a building 
may extend across the full width of the 
store wall, unless the store occupies the 
entire first floor of a detached building, 
in which event the sign may extend across 
not more than three fourths (%) of the 
width of the wall. The height of signs of 
stores occupying other than the first floor 
of a building shall not exceed three (3) 
feet. 

7.2.2.1 c. Number. There shall not be more than one 
exterior sign for each store except that if 
the store has a direct entrance into the 
store in a wall other than the store front, 
there may be a secondary sign affixed to 
such wall and, if the store has a wall other 
than the store front that faces upon a 
street or parking area, there may be a sec- 
ondary sign affixed to such wall whether 
or not such wall contains an entrance to 
the store; provided, however, that no store 
shall have more than two secondary signs 
in any event. The width of the secondary 
sign or signs shall not exceed fifty percent 
(50%) of the maximum permissible width 
of the sign on the store front. In addition 
to the foregoing sign or signs, there may be 
one directory of the occupants or tenants 
of the building affixed to the exterior wall 
of the building at each entrance to the 
building. Such directory shall not exceed 
an area determined on the basis of one (1) 
square foot for each occupant or tenant of 
the building. 

7.2.2.1 d. Construction. No sign shall be painted on 
or posted directly on the exterior surface 
of any wall, including windows and doors. 
All signs must be painted, posted or other- 



217 



wise securely affixed to a substantial in- 
termediary removable surface and such 
surface shall be securely affixed to the wall 
of the building. The foregoing, however, 
shall not prevent instalation of a sign by 
individual letters or devices cut into or 
securely affixed to the exterior wall of a 
building, provided that such letters or de- 
vices have a minimum depth or projection 
of one fourth (M) of an inch. The material 
of the sign and intermediary surface and 
the manner of affixation of the sign to the 
intermediary surface and of the intermedi- 
ary surface to the wall of the building shall 
be subject to the approval of the Building 
Inspector for the purpose of protecting the 
safety of the public. 

7.2.2.1 e. Illumination. Moving and flashing signs are 
prohibited. No red or green lights shall be 
used on any sign. No sign may be illumin- 
ated between 12:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., 
except signs identifying police or fire sta- 
tions and such other signs as the Board of 
Appeals may specifically authorize to be 
illuminated at other hours, if the Board 
finds that the nature of the use of the pre- 
mises is such that such illumination should 
be permitted in the public interest. 
The provisions of this paragraph shall ap- 
ply not only to exterior signs but also to 
interior signs that are designed or placed 
so as to shine through windows or doors of 
the building. 

7.2.2.1 f. Maintenance. All signs whether erected be- 
fore or after the effective date of this Bylaw 
shall be maintained in a safe condition to 
the satisfaction of the Building Inspector, 
and, if not, shall be removed. 

7.2.2.1 g. Gasoline Filling Stations and Garages may, 
if they elect to do so, divide the one exterior 
sign affixed to the front wall of the build- 
ing, to which they are entitled as herein- 
above provided, into separate signs affixed 
to and parallel to such wall and indicating 
the separate operations or departments of 
Ihe business, provided, however, that the 
total of the widths of the separate signs 



218 






shall not exceed the maximum width per- 
mitted under this Bylaw for a single ex- 
terior sign on such wall. The standard type 
of gasoline pump bearing thereon in usual 
size and form, the name or type of gasoline 
and the price thereof shall not be deemed 
to be in violation of this Bylaw. Temporary 
or movable signs of any and every type are 
specifically prohibited. 

7.2.2.2 Nonaccessory Signs 

No nonaccessory sign shall be erected or 
maintained in any "B" District or "B-I" Dis- 
trict unless otherwise permitted in this sec- 
tion of the Zoning Bylaw. 

7.2.2.3 Special Signs 

A directory-type sign listing the occupants 
in an industrial complex may be permitted 
subject to permission being granted by the 
Board of Appeals. Such a sign shall not exceed 
20 square feet for use as a heading and no 
more than 3 square feet per occupant. In no 
case shall any such sign exceed 80 square feet 
in area or 8 feet in width. 



7.2.2.4 Other 

No accessory, non accessory or special signs 
(other than a directory) shall be of the stand- 
ing type. Standing signs are prohibited. 

7.2.3 "I" District 

7.2.3.1 Accessory Signs 

7.2.3.1 a. Any sign shall be permitted that is per- 
mitted in the "B" District and in a "B-I" 
District subject to the same provisions of 
use. 

7.2.3.1 b. One wall sign shall be permitted for each 
building unit, provided: it shall be attached 
to the main wall of a building; it shall not 
project horizontally more than 12 inches 
therefrom; it shall be erected at a height 
not less than 10 feet, nor more than 30 
feet above the ground or sidewalk; it shall 
not exceed 100 square feet in surlace area; 
and if lighted, it shall be illuminated by 
reflector method with white light only. 



219 



r.2.3.1 c. Projecting signs arc prohibited. 

7.2.3.1 d. One ground sign for each building unit, 

provided: it shall not exceed 50 square 
feet in surface area; it shall set back at 
least one half the depth of the required 
front yard; and, if lighted, it shall be il- 
luminated by indirect method with white 
lights only. 

7.2.3.2 Nonaccessory Signs 

No nonaccessory sign shall be erected or main- 
tained in any "I" District unless otherwise per- 
mitted in this section of the Zoning Bylaw. 

7.2.3.3 Special Signs 

A directory-type sign listing the occupants in 
an industrial complex may be permitted sub- 
ject to permission being, granted by the Board 
of Appeals. Such a sign shall not exceed 20 
square feet for use as a heading and no more 
than 3 square feet per occupant. In no case 
shall any such sign exceed 80 square feet in 
area or 8 feet in width. 

7.3 MISCELLANEOUS 

7.3.1 Nonconforming Signs 

Signs legally erected before the adoption of this Bylaw 
that do not conform to the provisions of this Bylaw 
must be made to so comply within five (5) years after 
the effective date of this Bylaw, except that standing 
signs must be made to comply within three (3) years 
after the effective date of this Bylaw and except that 
all signs must be made to comply with the provisions 
of Paragraphs 7.2.1, 7.2.2 and 7.2.3 relative to illumin- 
ation within one (1) year after the effective date of 
this Bylaw. 

or take any other action relative thereto. (Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Zoning Bylaw 
Section 7, Regulations and Restrictions for Signs, or adopt as Article 
VIII of the general Bylaws the following: 

REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS FOR SIGNS 

7.1 PURPOSE 

This section is adopted for the regulation and restriction within 
the various zoning districts of the Town of Medfield of billboards, 

220 



signs and other advertising devices on public ways or on pri- 
vate property within public view of a public way, public park 
or reservation. This section shall not apply to signs exempted 
by Section 32 to Chapter 93 of the General Laws. 

7.2 "R" DISTRICTS 

7.2.1 Accessory Signs 

No accessory sign shall be erected or maintained on 
any premises in connection with a use permitted in a 
residential area by the Zoning Bylaw, except as follows : 

7.2.1.1 One sign for each dwelling unit, provided: 
such sign shall not exceed 1.5 square feet in 
surface area; if lighted, it shall be illuminated 
with white light by indirect method only, and 
it shall not be used other than for identifying 
the occupancy. It shall be set back at least one 
half of the required depth of the front yard. 

7.2.1.2 One sign for each community facility of pub- 
lic utility use: provided the sign shall not ex- 
ceed 12 square feet in surface area; if lighted, 
it shall be illuminated with white light by 
indirect method only; and it shall set back at 
least one half of the required depth of the 
front yard. 

7.2.1.3 One unlighted sign offering premises for sale 
or lease for each parcel in one ownership, 
provided: it shall not exceed 4 square feet in 
surface area; and it shall be set back at least 
one half of the required depth of the front 
yard. 

7.2.1.4 One unlighted temporary sign of a painter or 
other artisan erected during the period such 
person is performing work on such premises 
on which such sign is erected, provided: it shall 
not exceed 4 square feet in surface area; and 
it shall be set back at least one half of the 
required depth of the front yard. 

7.2.1.5 Accessory signs on premises lawfully being 
used for business or commercial purposes 
under a valid nonconforming use or variance 
granted by the Board of Appeals must com- 
ply with the provisions of the Zoning Bylaw 
as to accessory signs in "B" districts and such 
special conditions as the Board may require 
under Section 13. 



221 



L.6 One sign for each hotel or multifamily use 

in a "R-U" district: provided the sign shall 
not exceed 12 square feet in surface area; if 
lighted, it shall be illuminated with white 
light by indirect method only, and it shall set 
back at least one half of the required depth 
of the front yard. 

7.2.2 Nonaccessory Signs 

No nonaccessory sign shall be erected or maintained in 
an "R" district. 

7.2.3 Subdivision Sign 

Signs advertising subdivisions shall be limited to one 
(1) sign per subdivision. Such a sign need not be on the 
property of the developer. The sign shall not exceed 
twelve (12) square feet in area and shall not be il- 
luminated. A yearly permit for erection of the sign is 
required and may be granted by the Board of Select- 
men at their discretion. The Board may for any reason 
rescind the permit. 

7.3 "B" DISTRICT AND "B-I" DISTRICT 

7.3.1 Accessory Signs 

Any sign shall be permitted that is permitted in the 
"R" district subject to the same provisions of use. Ad- 
ditionally, accessory signs that comply with the pro- 
visions hereinafter set forth are permitted. All other 
accessory signs are expressly prohibited. 

7.3.1.1 One pole sign for each street frontage of an 
automotive service establishment, provided it 
shall not exceed 40 square feet in surface 
area; no portion of it shal set back less than 
15 feet from any street lot line; it shall not 
be erected so that any portion of it is over 
30 feet above the ground or sidewalk. 

7.3.1.2 One wall sign for each lot street frontage 
of each building unit, provided: it shall be 
attached to the main wall of a building: it 
.Thall not project horizontally more than 12 
inches therefrom; it shall be erected at a 
height not less than 10 feet, nor more than 
30 feet above the ground or sidewalk; it shall 
not exceed 40 square feet in surface area. 

7.3.1.3 One projecting sign for each lot, street front- 
age of each building unit provided: it shall be 



222 



attached to the main wall of a building; it 
shall project horizontally not more than 6 
feet therefrom; it shall be erected at a height 
not less than 10 feet, nor more than 30 feet 
above the ground or sidewalk, it shall not ex- 
ceed 40 square feet in surface area. 

7.3.2 Nonaccessory Signs 

No nonaccessory sign shall be erected or maintained 
in any "B" District or "B-I" District unless other- 
wise permitted in this section of the Zoning Bylaw. 

7.4 "I" DISTRICT 

7.4.1 Accessory Signs 

Any sign shall be permitted that is permitted in the 
"B" District and "B-I" District subject to the same 
provisions of use. 

7.4.1.1 One wall sign for each building unit, pro- 
vided it shall be attached to the main wall of 
a building; it shall not project horizontally 
more than 12 inches therefrom; it shall be 
erected at a height not less than 10 feet, nor 
more than 30 feet above the ground or side- 
walk; it shall not exceed 100 square feet in 
surface area. 

7.4.1.2 One projecting sign for each building unit, 
provided: it shall be attached to the main wall 
of a building; it shall project horizontally not 
more than 6 feet therefrom; it shall be erected 
at a height not less than 10 feet, nor more 
than 30 feet above the ground or sidewalk; 
it shall not be more than 100 square feet in 
surface area. 

7.4.1.3 One ground sign for each building unit, pro- 
vided: it shall not exceed 50 square feet in 
surface area; it shall set back at least one 
half the depth of the required front yard. 

7.4.2 Nonaccessory Signs 

No nonaccessory sign shall be erected or maintained 
in any "I" District unless otherwise permitted in this 
section of the Zoning Bylaw. 

7.4.3 Special Signs 

A directory- type sign listing the occupants in an indus- 
trial complex may be permitted subject to permis- 

223 



sion being granted by the Board of Appeals. Such a 
sign shall not exceed 20 square feet for use as a 
heading and no more than 3 square feet per occupant. 
In no case shall any sign exceed 80 square feet in area 
or 8 feet in width. 

GENERAL SIGN PROVISIONS 

7.5.1 Construction. No sign shall be painted on or posted 
directly on the exterior surface of any wall, including 
windows and doors. All signs must be painted, posted 
or otherwise securely affixed to a substantial interme- 
diary removable surface and such surface shall be 
securely affixed to the wall of the building. The fore- 
going, however, shall not prevent installation of a sign 
by individual letters or devices cut into or securely 
affixed to the exterior wall of a building, provided that 
such letters or devices have a minimum depth or pro- 
jection of one fourth (%) of an inch. The material of 
the sign and intermediary surface and the manner of 
affixation of the sign to the intermediary surface and 
of the intermediary surface to the wall of the building 
shall be subject to the approval of the Building Inspec- 
tor for the purpose of protecting the safety of the 
public. 

7.5.2 Illumination 

7.5.2.1 No sign may be illuminated between 12:00 
p.m. and 6:00 a.m., except signs identifying 
police or fire stations and such other signs as 
the Board of Appeals may specifically author- 
ize to be illuminated at other hours, if the 
Board finds that the nature of the use of the 
premises is such that such illumination should 
be permitted in the public interest. 

The provisions of this paragraph shall apply 
not only to exterior signs but also to interior 
signs that are designed or placed so as to shine 
through windows or doors of the building. 

7.5.2.2 A sign or its illuminator shall not by reason 
of its location, shape, intensity, or color inter- 
fere with traffic or be confused with or ob- 
struct the view of effectiveness of any official 
traffic sign, traffic signal or traffic marking; 
nor shall any sign be over 3% feet in area and 
less than 10 feet in height above the ground or 
sidewalk if it is located within the triangular 
area formed by the intersection of the curb 



224 



lines of streets and/or track lines of railroads 
with streets and a straight line adjoining said 
curb and/or track lines at points which are 
25 feet distant from the point of intersection 
measured along such lines. 

7.5.2.3 In an Industrial-Extensive (I-E> District all 
lights and other surces of illumination 
(whether interior or exterior) and all intense 
light emanating from operation or equipment 
(such as from an acetylene torch) shall be 
shielded from direct view at normal eye level 
from streets and Residential District. 

7.5.3 Maintenance. All signs whether erected before or after 
the effective date of this Bylaw shall be maintained in 
a safe condition to the satisfaction of the Building 
Inspector, and, if not, shall be removed. 

or take any other action relatve thereto. (Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By- 
law and its Zoning Map, as amended, by adding to Section I, Sub- 
section 1. a seventh class of district to be known as VI A, "P" Public 
Housing District, pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. 

(Medfield Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 59. To To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws by adding the following : 

Section VI A "P" Public Housing District 

In a "P" Public Housing District no buildings or premises shall 
be erected, altered or used for any purpose except: 

1. Any use permitted in an "A" Residence District unless specifi- 
cally prohibited by this Zoning By-law. 

2. Public Housing which shall hereby be defined as housing 
operated by a public body created pursuant to Section 26K of 
Chapter 121 of the General Laws to provide housing for the 
elderly. 

3. Public Housing shall be specifically exempt from the following 
requirements under Section VI, Apartments, of the Zoning By- 
laws, all other provisions of said Section VI shall otherwise be 
in full force and effect in this district. 

Exemptions — Section VI, Section 1 — "... each apart- 
ment building shall occupy one lot in single ownership through- 
out . . .", Paragraph 1. (e), minimum living space per square 
feet of living space per dwelling unit; 2. Area and width regu- 



225 



lations; Paragraph 4. (a) required minimum off street parking 
spaces. 

Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. 

(Medfield Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law of the Town by removing from Section III, "B" residence and 
the zoning may of the Town to Section VI A "P" Public Housing Dis- 
trict the following described parcel of land: 

L. 

Commencing at a point on the southerly sideline of Pound 

Street approximately 263.77 feet from the intersection of the south- 
erly sideline of Pound Street and the easterly sideline of South 
Street, thence: 

Southeasterly in three courses 54.20 feet, 210.00 feet and 81.45 
feet; thence 

Easterly 282.95 feet; thence 

Northwesterly in three courses 133.93 feet, 168.00 feet and 
50.00 feet to Pound Street; thence 

Southwesterly along Pound Street 288.00 feet to the point of 
beginning. 

Meaning and intending to rezone lots 7, 8 and 9 now or formerly 
owned by one Kingsbury which were the subject of a zoning arti- 
cle at the Special Town Meeting of June 1971. 

r 

Containing 97,844 square feet, more or less. 

Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. 

(Medfield Housing Authority) 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to appoint a Committee 
consisting of the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, the Chairman of the Planning Board, the 
Chairman of the Industrial Committee, the Chairman of the Board of 
Assessors and the Chief of Police and the Chief of the Fire Department, 
said Committee to study the possibility of re-zoning for the Town of 
Medfield with a view of broadening the tax base of the Town and to see 
what sum of money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or trans- 
fer from available funds to defray the expenses of the Committee, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town of Medfield will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to instruct Boston Edison Company to install 
street lights on Arnold Drive for safety reasons, on the following utility 
poles: 2, 4, 6, 8. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator 
to appoint a committee of five (5) members and authorize it to make 



226 



arrangements and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the 
observance of Memorial Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following 
named sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine 
Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof or as may be necessary to be used 
for said care, viz: 

Theodore Suereth Lot $200 

Conners-Barcello Lot 100 

Ernest Elsemore Lot 100 

Charles & Gladys Clougherty Lot 600 

Walter & Elizabeth Lefbvre Lot 200 

Robert Chase Lot 400 

Audrey Tighe Lot 100 

Donald Wallace Lot 120 

Adele Duffy Lot 100 

Byron Reed Lot 20 

Bullard-Hughes Lot 200 

Burgess P. Standley Lot 800 

Ewan Cebrowski Lot 600 

Charles Cain Lot 400 

Mildred Rossi Lot 150 

Wiley Scribner Lot 100 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this first day of February, A.D., Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-two. 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 

WESTON G. KOLSTI 

JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 

Selectmen of Medfield 



227 



I COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEDFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 

February 25, 1972 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants 
of the Town of Mcdfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at the time 
and for the purpose named by posting attested copies of said warrant in 
not less than five public places in the Town at least seven days before 
the time of holding the meeting. 

WILLIAM H. MANN 

Constable 
A True Copy. 
Attest: 

NANCY J. PRESTON 
Town Clerk 



228 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING FOR 
THE ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

MARCH 6, 1972 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the meeting was opened at 6:00 
a m. by the Warden with the reading of the Warrant through Article 1. 
The ballot box had been previously checked and found to be in 
good working order, a corrected voting list displayed and instructions 
to the voters and specimen ballots posted as required. The workers were 
sworn in and assigned to their duties: Mary MairEtienne and Evelyn 
Gronberg checking and distributing ballots at the entrance; Beatrice 
Bangs and Anna Murphy checking at the ballot box; John F. Ganley and 
Clara Denucci, Warden and Deputy Warden in charge of the ballot 
box. At 4:00 p.m. Mae Maguire, Barbara Connors, Edna Hinkiey, Sarah 
Regan were also sworn ill as checkers. The tellers for the counting of 
ballots after the polls were closed were Mary MairEtienne, Mary 
Lovell, Anna Murphy, Edna Hinkiey, Sarah Regan, Barbara Armstrong, 
John DeMartino, Jr., Catherine Shaughnessy, Margaret Laughlin, Ther- 
esa Calderaro, Sheila Balboni, Elizabeth Ekstrom, Evelyn Gronberg, 
Beverly Smith, Jonathan Early, Jean Sanders, Beatrice Bangs, Mae 
Maguire, Jane Minesinger, Nathalie Thomas, Jeanne Mikelonis, Emmy 
Mitchell, Patty Holsapple, Roberta Koisti, Barbara Connors and Muriel 
Mandelik. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. 

The total vote cast was 1715. This included 21 absentee ballots. This 
was just over 38% of the 4459 registered voters. 

After the final tabulation was made, the results were announced 
as follows : 

MODERATOR 

Charles F. Woodard 1466 

Blanks 246 

Scattered 3 

1715 

TOWN CLERK 

Nancy J. Preston 1546 

Blanks 169 

1715 

TREASURER 
Edward F. Barrett, Jr. 1494 

Blanks 221 

1715 



229 



SELECTMAN 

h L. Marcionette 1411 

Blanks 300 

Scattered 4 

1715 



ASSESSOR 






Melville J. Mills 


1489 




Blanks 


226 


1715 


TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY 






Mary M. Hay 


1448 




Laura H. Smith 


1489 




Blanks 


493 









3430 


MEMBERS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE 






Philip J. Burr 


1166 




Arthur L. Lomker 


846 




Sonja J. Siders 


988 




Blanks 


429 




Scattered 


1 


3430 


MEMBER OF BOARD OF HEALTH 






Claude B. Levesque 


499 




Arthur F. Owens 


426 




Frederic C. Temple 


672 




Blanks 


118 






— — 


1715 


CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 






Joseph A. Roberts 


1547 




Blanks 


168 









1715 


MEMBER OF WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 




Harry R. Leighton 


1516 




Blanks 


199 


1715 


MEMBER OF PARK COMMISSION 






John H. Callow 


756 




Warren E. Sheard 


852 




Blanks 


107 


1715 


MEMBER OF PLANNING BOARD 






Kenneth S. Hoyt 


537 




Sandra G. Munsey 
Blanks 


1027 
151 


1715 






230 



QUESTIONS 

QUESTION I. "Shall this Town approve the new Charter recommended 
by the Charter Commission as summarized below?" 



Yes 


1264 


No 


347 


Blanks 


104 



1715 
Main feature of proposed Charter: 

(a) Increased information for voters through an ex- 
panded Annual Town Meeting Warrant Report and 
public hearing prior to its publication; 

(b) Dates of Town Election and Town Meeting changed 
in view of change in Town's Fiscal year required by 
law; 

(c) Open Town Meetings retained; 

( d ) Three-member Board of Selectmen retained ; 

(e) All present elective offices retained except four, 
which will become appointive to permit improved 
supervision of essential Town services (Board of 
Health, Cemetery Commission, Tree Warden, and 
Water and Sewerage Board.) 

QUESTION II. Public Policy — "Shall Licenses be granted in this 
Town for the operation, holiday or conducting a game commonly 
called Beano? 



Yes 


1060 




No 


570 




Blanks 


85 


1715 



After the results were publicly announced, the ballots, tally sheets 
and master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping 
as prescribed by law. 
A true copy attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 
Town Clerk 



231 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING FOR THE 

TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS HELD ON 

March 13, 1972 

The was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 P.M. in 

the Amo-i Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium and the following 
action was taken on the remaining articles in the Warrant. 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded in their 
regular sequence regardless of the order in which they were 
acted upon. Article 2 was acted upon then Articles 6 thru 19 
before the action on Article 3. 

ARTICLE 2. Voted to accept the reports of the several Town Officers 
for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted to raise and appropriate the following named sums 
of money to defray the departmental and other expenses of the Town for 
the ensuing year requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, 
Board Commission and Committee as required by General Laws, Chapter 
41, Section 108. 

A100-0Q Selectmen 

A100-01 Administration 



100 


Personnel 


$18,255.00 






200 


Operation 


1,600.00 






300 


Supplies 


2,000.00 






400 


Other Charges 


450.00 






500 


Equipment 


300.00 


$ 


22,605.00 


A100-02 


Town Accountant 








100 


Personnel 


$6,162.00 






200 


Operations 


150.00 


$ 


6,312.00 


A100-03 


Executive Secretary 








100 


Personnel 


$14,345.00 






200 


Operations 


360.00 






300 


Supplies 


125.00 


$ 


14,830.00 




(Total A100-01, 02, 03 - 


-$43,747.00) 






A101-00 


Town Counsel 








100 


Personnel 


$5,000.00 






200 


Operations 


1,050.00 






300 


Supplies 


150.00 







$ 6,200.00 
232 



A102-00 Treasurer 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

A103-00 Tax Collector 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

A104-00 Town Clerk 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

A105-00 Assessors 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

400 Other Charges 

500 Equipment 

A106-00 Planning Board 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 



A107-00 


Park & Recreation 


A107-01 


Administration 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


300 


Supplies 


A107-02 


Swim Pond 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


300 


Supplies 



$8,596.00 

1,970.00 

30.00 


$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 


10,596.00 


$9,625.00 

590.00 

2,033.00 


12,248.00 


$2,450.00 
500.00 
123.00 


3,073.00 


$ 8,150.00 

14,465.00 

539.00 

250.00 

175.00 


23,579.00 


$2,200.00 

2,690.00 

40.00 


4,930.00 



$1,750.00 

3,675.00 

200.00 



$8,100.00 

1,610.00 

400.00 



$ 5,625.00 



$ 10,110.00 



A107-03 Recreation Programs 

100 Personnel $4,690.00 

200 Operations — 0— 

300 Supplies 1,840.00 



$ 6,530.00 



233 



•04 Parks 



100 


Personnel 


.S2.000.00 




200 


Operations 


150.00 




300 


Supplies 
Skating 


315.00 


$ 


A107-05 






100 


Personnel 


$380.00 




200 


Operations 

(Total A107-01 thru 5 - 


120.00 


$ 




-$25,230.00) 




A108-00 


Elections and Registration 






100 


Personnel 


$5,117.00 




200 


Operations 


2,423.00 




300 


Supplies 
Town Hall 


75.00 


$ 


A109-00 






100 


Personnel 


$ 3,276.00 




200 


Operations 


12,855.00 




500 


Equipment 


2,000.00 










$ 



A110-00 Highway Department 

A110-01 Administration 

100 Personnel 

300 Supplies 



A110-02 Chapter 81 

A110-04 Maintenance 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 



A110-05 Sidewalks 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

A110-06 Snow & Ice 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 



$16,136.00 
1,100.00 



$54,087.00 
28,152.00 



$673.00 
827.00 



$19,500.00 
30,500.00 



(Total A110-01, 02, 04, 05, 06 — $159,375.00) 
Alll-00 Police Department 



2,465.00 



500.00 



7,615.00 



18,131.00 






17,236.00 
8,400.00 



$ 82,239.00 



$ 1,500.00 



$ 50,000.00 



234 



Alll-01 Administration 

100 Personnel $ 34,912.00 

Alll-02 Operations 

100 Personnel $117,739.00 

200 Operations 6,195.00 

300 Supplies 570.00 

$ 124,504.00 



Alll-03 Cruiser 

200 Operations $ 6,000.00 

Alll-04 Communications 

200 Operations $ 3,808.00 

Alll-05 Traffic Markings & Signs 

200 Operations $ 5,500.00 

Alll-06 School Traffic 

100 Personnel $9,837.00 

200 Operations 200.00 

$ 10,037.00 



Alll-09 Equipment Acquisition 

500 Equipment $ 450.00 

(Total Alll-01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 09 — $185,211.00) 

A112-00 Fire Department 



A112-01 


Administration 








100 


Personnel 


$11,000.00 






200 


Operations 


1,395.00 


$ 


12,395.00 


A112-02 


Operations 








100 


Personnel 


$13,455.00 






200 


Operations 


7,930.00 






400 


Other Charges 


300.00 






500 


Equipment 


1,340.00 


$ 


23,025.00 




(Total A112-01, 02- 


-$35,420.00) 






A114-00 


Tree & Moth 








Al 14-01 


Mosquito Control 








200 


Operations 




$ 


1,500.00 


A114-02 


Tree Care 








100 


Personnel 


$6,200.00 






200 


Operations 


986.00 






300 


Supplies 


14.00 







7,200.00 



235 



Al 14-03 Insect & Pest Control 

100 Personnel $1,200.00 

200 Operations 800.00 

500 Equipment 7,400.00 



A 114-04 Dutch Elm 

100 Personnel $1,700.00 

200 Operations 500.00 



(Total A114-01, 02, 03, 04 — $20,300.00) 
Al 15-00 Building Inspector 



9,400.00 



$ 2,200.00 



100 
200 
300 


Personnel 

Operations 

Supplies 

Plumbing Inspector 

Personnel 

Operations 

Gas Inspector 

Personnel 

Operations 

Wiring Inspector 

Personnel 

Operations 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Personnel 

Operations 

Dog Officer 

Personnel 

Operations 

Civil Defense 
Operations 
Supplies 
Equipment 


$6,488.00 
775.00 
477.00 


$ 


A116-00 
100 
200 


$1,299.00 

140.00 


$ 


A117-00 
100 
200 


$1,050.00 
160.00 


$ 


A118-00 
100 
200 


$1,959.00 
221.00 


$ 


A119-00 
100 
200 


$165.00 
85.00 


$ 


A120-00 
100 
200 


$1,000.00 

100.00 


$ 


A121-00 
200 
300 
500 


$360.00 

15.00 

425.00 


$ 



7,740.00 



1.439.00 



1,210.00 



2,180.00 



250.00 






1,100.00 



800.00 



236 



A122-00 


Board of Appeals 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


300 


Supplies 


A123-00 


Street Lights 


200 


Operations 



A125-00 Board of Health 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

A126-00 Public Health Nurse 

100 Personnel 

A127-00 Garbage Disposal 

200 Operations 

A128-00 Mental Health 

200 Operations 

A129-00 Ambulance 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 
300 Supplies 

A130-00 Sanitary Landfill 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 



A131-00 Sewer Operations 
100 Personnel 
200 Operations 



A132-00 


Veterans 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


300 


Supplies 


400 


Other Charges 


A133-00 


Memorial Day 


200 


Operations 


A134-00 


Council on Aging 


200 


Operations 



$475.00 
250.00 
125.00 


$ 


850.00 




$ 


17,503.00 


$2,701.00 
2,756.00 
1,225.00 


$ 


6,682.00 




$ 


2,075.00 




$ 


19,000.00 




$ 


3,700.00 


$2,800.00 

950.00 

50.00 


$ 


3,800.00 


$ 8,477.00 
13,422.00 


$ 


21,899.00 


$1,950.00 
6,000.00 


$ 


7,950.00 


$ 990.00 

355.00 

157.00 

26,000.00 


$ 


27,502.00 




$ 


750.00 




$ 


250.00 



237 



A135-00 


Libra r> 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


300 


Supplies 


400 


Credits 


500 


Equipment 


A140-00 


Water Department 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


300 


Supplies 


400 


New Services 


A145-00 


Cemetery Commission 


100 


Personnel 


200 


Operations 


500 


Equipment 



A146-00 Conservation Commission 

100 Personnel 

200 Operations 

300 Supplies 

400 Other Charges 



A150-00 Town Debt 
400 Principal 
400 Interest 



A155-00 Insurance 

A155-01 Vehicles 

A155-02 Workmen's Compensation 

A155-03 Property & Liability 

A155-04 Group 

A160-00 Town Report 

200 Operations 

A161-00 County Retirement 

A162-00 Stabilization Fund 

A163-00 Reserve Fund 



20,111.00 

10,950.00 

868.00 

(9,470.00) 

2,042.00 



$ 31,911.00 

22,525.00 

450.00 

7,500.00 



$ 9,600.00 

2,200.00 

500.00 



— 0— 
$ 1,070.00 
50.00 
205.00 



$ 372,600.00 
235,000.00 



$ 4,600.00 
11,000.00 
12,500.00 
48,576.00 



$ 24,501.00 



$ 62,386.00 



$ 12,300.00 



$ 1,325.00 



$ 607,600.00 



$ 76,676.00 

$ 5,000.00 
$ 38,605.00 

— 0— 
$ 30,000.00 



238 



A 170-00 Town Meetings 






100 
200 


Personnel 
Operations 

Finance Committee 

Operations 

Supplies 

Personnel Board 

Personnel 

Operations 

School Administration 

Personnel 

Operations 

Instruction 

Personnel 

Operations 

Other School Services 
Personnel 
Operations 
Supplies 

Plant Operations & Maintenance 

Personnel 

Operations 


$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 
$ 

$2 
$2 

$ 

$ 
$ 


628.00 
677.00 


$ 

$ 

$2 

$ 


1,305.00 


A171-00 
200 
300 


30.00 
833.00 


863.00 


A175-00 
100 

200 

1000-00 
100 
200 


375.00 
275.00 

72,848.00 
5,250.00 


650.00 




78,098.00 


78,098.00 


2000-00 
100 
200 


1,072,240.00 
114,152.00 




,186,392.00 


:,186,392.00 


3000-00 
100 
206 
300 


23,291.00 
79,327.00 
17,107.00 






119,725.00 


119,725.00 


4000-00 
100 
200 


173,734.00 
138,423.00 






312,157.00 


312,157.00 



6000-00 Community Services 

100 Personnel 

7000-00 Acquisition of Assets 

300 Supplies & Materials 

9000-00 Programs with Other Systems 

400 Other Charges & Credits 



$ 42,133.00 
$ 8,476.00 



239 



Total 1000, -2000, 3000, 4000. 6000, 7000, 9000— $2,746,981.00 

8000-01 Vocational Education 

200 Operations $ 10,000.00 

8000-02 Adult Education 

100 Personnel $ 2,700.00 

8000-03 School Planning & Building Committee 

100 Personnel $ 350.00 

200 Operations 100.00 

300 Supplies 250.00 

400 Other Charges 500.00 

$ 1,200.00 



Grand Total of Article 3 Appropriations $4,304,427.00 

SUMMARY OF OTHER APPROPRIATIONS: 

Article 22. Purchase of police cruisers $ 6,300.00 

Article 23. Purchase of truck chassis 

for Street Department 17,394.00 

Article 25. Replacing drainage culvert 

on Upham Road 5,900.00 

Article 26. Town's share of Chapter 90 1,500.00 

Article 28. Construction of Town Garage 145,000.00 

Article 30. Land Damages for North 

Street & Philip Street 782.08 

Article 31. Adjusting Town Utilities 

for Route 27 8,000.00 

Article 35. Recreation for Mentally 

Handicapped 1,437.00 

Article 38. Purchase of Lot 737 — 

Conservation Commission 15,000.00 

Article 40. Conservation Fund 3,000.00 

Article 47. Swim Pond — Aeration/ 

circulation system 2,600.00 

Article 50. Master Plan — Housing 

Impact Study 5,000.00 



Total of Sepecial Appropriations $ 211,913.08 



Total Article 3 Appropriations $4,304,427.00 



Grand Total to be raised $4,516,340.08 
240 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETiNG 
March 14, 1972 

The Meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:40 p.m. and 
action was taken on the General School budget Article 3 A1000-00 and 
remaining Article 3 questioned items. A quorum was ascertained before 
the beginning of the meeting. 

ARTICLE 4. Voted to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue for the 
financial years beginning January 1, 1972 and January 1, 1973 in accor- 
dance with provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 17. 

ARTICLE 5. Voted to authorize the Collector to use all means in the 
collection of taxes as the Treasure might if elected to that office. 

ARTICLE 6. Voted to fix the salary and compensation of the following 
elected officers: 



Moderator 




— 0— 




Town Clerk 




$1,950.00 




Treasurer 




3,000.00 




Selectmen 


Chairman 


575.00 






Clerk 


550.00 






Other Member 


550.00 




Assessors 


Chairman 


400.00 






Clerk 


375.00 






Third Member 


375.00 




School Committee 


— 0— 




Trustees of Public Library 


— 0— 




Collector of Taxes 


4,000.00 




Board of Health 




— 0— 




Cemetery Commissioners 


— 0— 




Water &■ Seweraj 


?e Commissioners 


— 0— 




Planning Board 




— 0— 




Park Commissioners 


— 0— 




Tree Warden 




4.10 per 


hour 






ARTICLE 7. Voted to amend Section 16 of the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan by changing the first sentence to read as follows: 

Regular full-time employees exclusive of Department Heads will 
be paid one and one-half time for all hours worked in excess of 
forty (40) hours per week within the Department where the em- 
ployee is regularly employed, effective July 1, 1972. 



241 



ARTICLE 8, Voted to amend certain positions under Classification of 
Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan as 

follows: 

POLICE Rale Range 

DEPARTMENT Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

Sergeant 9,600.00 10,000.00 10,500.00 

Patrolmen 7,260.00 7,810.00 8,360.00 9,000.00 9,600.00 

ARTICLE 9. Voted to amend Section 12 of the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan by deleting the table of Time Employed and substituting the 
following therefor: 

As of June 1st Each Year Length of Vacations 

6 months up to one year 5 days 

1 year, but less than five years 10 days 

5 years, but less than ten years 15 days 

10 years and over 20 days 

ARTICLE 10. Voted to dismiss this article pertaining to the pay 
schedule of the Recreation Coordinator. 

ARTICLE 11. Voted to amend the Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan to read as follows: 

REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 

LIBRARY Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

Librarian Annual 4,455. 4,785. 5,115. 5,445. 5,940. 

ARTICLE 12. Voted to direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
General Court to enact legislation to remove the position of Chief of 
Police of the Town of Medfield from the operation of the Civil Service 
Law, and exempting the present incumbent from such law. 

Yes 347 

No 283 

ARTICLE 13. Voted to dismiss this article seeking to amend the 
Personnel Administration Plan by adding a section which would have 
Temporary Intermittent Police Officers considered as regular part- 
time employees in the application of Section 12, 14 and 15. 

ARTICLE 14. Voted to dismiss this article seeking to amend the 
Personnel Administration Plan in regards to Sick Leave. 

ARTICLE 15. Voted to dismiss this article seeking to amend the 
Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Admin- 
istration Plan in the Executive Department. 

ARTICLE 16. Voted to dismiss this article seeking a Step-increase or 
a 5.5% pay increase in the Street Department. 



242 



ARTICLE 17. Voted to dismiss this article seeking a 5.5% pay increase 
for the Water & Sewerage Department Pay Schedule. 

ARTICLE 18. Voted to authorize the Water and Sewerage Board to 
appoint one of its members as Water Superintendent and to fix the 
compensation at $4.30 per hour. 

ARTICLE 19. Voted to authorize the Cemetery Commissioners to 
appoint one of its members as Superintendent and to fix the compen- 
sation of the Cemetery Superintendent at $2.50 per hour. 

ARTICLE 20. Voted to amend Article 26 of the Annual Town Meet- 
ing of March 11, 1963 as follows: 

After the first sentence, insert the following sentence: 

"No such person shall solicit after dark, unless by prior ap- 
pointment." 

ARTICLE 21. Voted to substitute the following for Section 14 of Ar- 
ticle IV, Police Regulations, of the Town By-laws: 

Article IV, Section 14. 

"No person shall fire or discharge any firearm within the 
limits of any park, playground, or other public property except 
with the consent of the Board of Selectmen, or hunt or fire or 
discharge any firearm on any private property except with the con- 
sent of the owner or legal occupant thereof. This By-law shall not 
apply to the lawful defense of life or property, or to any law 
enforcement officer acting in the discharge of his duties. Any person 
violating any of the provisions of this By-law shall be punished by 
a fine of not more than twenty (20) dollars for each offense." 

ARTICLE 22. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Six Thousand 
Three Hundred Dollars ($6,300.00) for the purchase and equipping 
two vehicles for use as police cruisers, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to trade or sell as part of the purchase price 

ARTICLE 23. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Seventeen 
Thousand, Three Hundred Ninety Four Dollars ($17,394.00) for the pur- 
chase of a truck chassis and body for the Street Department and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade as part of the purchase price a 
1954 white chassis. 

ARTICLE 24. Voted to dismiss this article regarding storm drainage 
on Pleasant Street between Curve Street and Metacomet Street. 

ARTICLE 25. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifty-nine 
Hundred Dollars ($5,900.00) for the purpose of replacing a drainage 
culvert in Upham Road. 

ARTICLE 26. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifteen Hun- 
dred Dollars ($1,500.00) as the Town's Chapter 90 share for the main- 



243 



tenance of Chapter 90 roads; said funds to be used with funds allotted 
by the County and State. 

ARTICLE 27. Voted to dismiss this article relative to the Town's Chap- 
ter 90 share for the reconstruction of Hospital Road and Harding 
Street and/or North Street. 

Voted to adjourn the meeting until Monday, March 20, Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School at 7:30 p.m. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 20, 1972 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 after 
ascertaining that a quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 28. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hun- 
dred Forty-Five Thousand Dollars ($145,000.00) for the purpose of con- 
structing a Town Garage and that the Board of Selectmen be authorized 
to enter into contracts for the same, to approve payment of bills and 
to accept the work when completed. 

Yes 280 

No 201 

ARTICLE 29. Voted unanimously to accept as public ways the follow- 
ing named streets or parts thereof: 

Lakewood Drive from Station 1 -f- 20.91 to Station 6 + 75.00 
Lee Road from Station 14 + 90.00 to Station 20 + 89.76 

ARTICLE 30. Voted to raise and appropriate the following sums for 
the purpose of paying land damages arising from the relocation of 
the following named streets: 

North Street $512.08 

Philip Street 270.00 

ARTICLE 31. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Eight 
Thousand Dollars ($8,000.00) for the purpose of adjusting Town utilities 
in conjunction with the construction of proposed Route 27. 



244 



ARTICLE 32. Voted to dismiss this article concerning the relocation of 
Green Street. 

Yes 58 

No 374 

ARTICLE 33. Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint 
a committee to study the feasibility of having the records of the Town 
departments maintained by electronic data processing or similar process- 
ing. 

ARTICLE 34. Voted to amend the By-laws by adding Section 23 to 
Article 11 as follows: 

"The Board of Selectmen may apply for and enter into con- 
tracts for grants or gifts of funds from the Federal government, the 
state government, a charitable foundation, a private corporation, 
or an individual; provided, however, that no contract calling for 
expenditures of funds by the Town shall be entered into until such 
time as the funds have been appropriated by vote of the Town. 
The School Committee shall have the same powers as the Board 
of Selectmen regarding grants or gifts of funds for educational 
purposes." 

ARTICLE 35. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of One Thousand 
Four Hundred Thirty-seven Dollars ($1,437.00) for the purpose of pro- 
viding recreation for the physically and mentally handicapped. 

ARTICLE 36. Voted to hear iand act on the reports of any special 
committeeis appointed at any previous Special Town Meeting or Annual 
Town Meeting or appointed by the Moderator or Selectmen. No reports 
to be heard. 

Note: A motion to reconsider Article 28 failed to carry.) 

ARTICLE 37. Voted that the Board of Selectmen and the Conservation 
Commission be authorized to apply to any and all Federal, state and 
private agencies or individuals for grants, gifts or other reimbursements 
for all or part of the purchase price of $12,000.00) Twelve Thousand Dol- 
lars for the purchase of Lot 726 as shown on the Aassessors plans, 10.3 
acres, located on Noon Hill Road, now or formerly belonging to James F. 
Gilmore, Frederick H. Gilmore, Warren R. Gilmore and Samuel R. 
Gilmore. 

ARTICLE 38. Voted that the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,- 
000.00) be raised and appropriated to the Conservation Fund to be 
used for the purchase of Lot 737 as shown on the Assessor's Plan, 9.9 
acres, on Noon Hill, from Delmar Kelley, and that the Board of Select- 
men and the Conservation Commission be authorized to apply to any and 
all Federal, state and private agencies or individuals for grants, gifts or 
other reimbursements for all or part of the purchase price. 



245 



ARTICLE 39. Voted to dismiss this article relating to the purchase ui 
additional land by the Conservation Commission. 

ARTICLE 40. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Three Thou- 
sand Dollars ($3,000.00) for the "Conservation Fund". 

ARTICLE 41. Voted to dismiss this article regarding the paving of the 
diagonal sidewalk in Baxter Park. 

ARTICLE 42. Voted to dismiss this article regarding the repair of the 
retaining wall at Baker's Pond. 

ARTICLE 43. Voted to dismiss this article regarding the repair of the 
retaining wall and sidewalk at Baker's Pond. 

ARTICLE 44. Voted to dismiss this article for the resetting of granite 
caps at Baker's Pond. 

ARTICLE 45. Voted to dismiss this article for the repairing of the 
granite retaining wall at Baker's Pond. 

ARTICLE 46. Voted to dismiss this article for the replacement or re- 
pairing of fencing at Bakers Pond. 

ARTICLE 47. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Two Thou- 
sand Six Hundred Dollars ($2,600.00) for the purpose of purchasing and 
installing an aeration/circulation system at the Corporal Stephen 
Kinkley Memorial Park. 

Yes 156 

No 150 

ARTICLE 48. Voted to dismiss this article which sought a sum of 
money for the purpose of securing plans for Metacomet Park. 

A motion to reconsider Article 3 — A107-02 was unanimous 

A107-02 Operations was reduced $600.00 to reflect the decrease 
in cost due to the passage of Article 47. 

ARTICLE 49. Voted to dismiss this article for a School Survey Com- 
mittee. 

ARTICLE 50. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Five Thousand 
Dollars ($5,000.00) for the purpose of updating the Master Plan. 

ARTICLE 51. Voted to dismiss this article seeking money to replace 
the chassis of the 1954 forest truck for the Fire Department. 

ARTICLE 52. Voted to dismiss this article regarding the purchase of 
a new 1,000 gallon per minute Class A Pumper for the Fire Department. 

AFtTICLE 53. Voted to dismiss this article for an engineering survey 
and to drill test wells. 



246 



ARTICLE 54. Voted to dismiss this article authorizing the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash for the reduction of 
the 1972 Tax Rate. 

Voted to adjourn the meeting at 10:45 p.m. until March 21, 1972 at 
7:30 p.m. at the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 21, 1972 

ARTICLE 54 was the first article acted upon on March 21, 1972 not on 
March 20, 1972. 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 p.m. A 

quorum was ascertained before starting the meeting. 

HI 

A motion to reconsider Article 3 — 107-03 Personnel was unami- 

nous. This amount was adjusted to reect a mistake in the personnel ac- 
count. 

ARTICLE 55. Voted to substitute for the existing Zoning By-law upon 
approval of the Attorney General, the following Zoning By-law as it 
appears in the Warrant and in the Three Hundred and Twenty-first 
Annual Report of the Town Officers of Medfield, Mass., except that in 
Section 2, titled "Definitions" that the subparagraph that defines Open 
Area Residential Development, number 2.1.31, be deleted in its entirety, 
and that in Section 5, Use Regulations, 5.4 Table of Use Regulations, that 
the use as indicated in this table that applies to Open Area Residential, 
number 5.4.1.6 be deleted in its entirety for all zoning districts, and that 
its reference in Section 13, Administration and Enforcement, subpara- 
graph le.10.2b be deleted in its entirety; and that in Section 2, titled 
"Definitions" that the subparagraph that defines "nonprofit organization" 
the words "including Public Housing for the Elderly" that in the 5.4 Table 
of Use Regulations 5.4.1.4 after the words, "Multi-family dwelling," t/iere 
be inserted the words, "including Public Housing for the Elderly," that in 
6.2 Table of Area Regulations there be added under District R-U the use, 
"Public Housing for the Elderly" with the following: Minimum Re- 
quired Area 12,000 Sq. Ft., plus per unit 2,000 sq. ft., Lot Width 200 feet, 
Depth 100 feet, Front 30 feet, Yard Side 20 feet, Yard Rear 50 feet; that 
Section 6.2.1 be amended by adding after "Planned Development", the 
words "Public Housing for the Elderly," that in paragraph 14.4 Effec- 
tive Date, that the paragraph beginning "Note" be eliminated. 

247 



First Amendment: 

Voted to amend the motion on Article 55 by changing Section 5.4 
"Table of Use Regulations" sub-section 5.4.1.2, 5.4.1.3, 5.4.1.4, 5.4.1.10, 

5.4.4.5. 5.4.4.7, as follows: 

a. 5.4.1.2 — under R-U substitute the word "No" for "Yes". 

b. 5.4.1.3 — under R-E, R-T, R-S and R-U change the abbrevia- 
tion "Sp" to the word "No". 

c. 5.4.1.4 — under R-U substitute the word "No" for "Yes". 

d. 5.4.1.10 — under R-E, R-T, R-S and R-U change the abbrevia- 
tion "Sp" to the word "No". 

e. 5.4.4.5 — under R-U change the abbreviation "Sp" to the word 
"No". 

f. 5.4.4.7 — under R-U change the abbreviation "Sp to the 
word "No". 

Yes 159 

No 85 

Although this does not show a total of 250 voting a point of 
order was called, as this did not show a quorum, but no one chal- 
lenged the moderator for a count and subsequently a count was 
taken which showed 292 present. 
Second Amendment: 

Voted to amend the 5.4 Table of Use Regulations under 5.4.2 Com- 
munity Facilities by adding a new sub-section 5.4.2.17 Multi-family 
Public Housing for the Elderly. R-E, No; R-T, No, R-S, No; R-U. 
Yes; B, No; B-I, No; I-E, No. 

This vote was unaminous 

Third Amendment : 

Voted to amend the New Zoning By-law of the Town by modifying 
and changing the Zoning Map Section 3, 3.1 to include all of lots 
840 and 841 as shown on Assessors Map to I-E Industrial Extensive, 
located between West Mill Street, and West Street and N.Y., N.H., & 
H.R.R. and Penn Central. 

Yes 121 

No 119 

Final Vote on Article 55 as amended: 

Yej 244 

No 19 



248 



Copies of the above Zoning By-law as amended are on file in the 
Town Clerk's Selectmen's and Planning Board's offices. 

ARTICLE 56. Voted to dismiss this article relating to signs. 

Yes 105 

No 160 

ARTICLE 57. Voted to dismiss this article relating to signs. 

ARTICLE 58. Voted to dismiss this article. Housing for the Elderly. 

ARTICLE 59. Voted to dismiss this article. Housing for the Elderly. 

ARTICLE 60. Voted to dismiss this article. Housing for the Elderly. 

ARTICLE 61. Voted to dismiss this article seeking to appoint a Com- 
mittee to study the broadening of the tax base from a rezoning study. 

ARTICLE 62. Voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen to instruct the 
Boston Edison Company to install street lights on Arnold Drive for 
safety reasons on utility poles: 2, 4, 6, 8. 

A move to reconsider Article 21 failed to carry. 

Yes 120 

No 137 

ARTICLE 63. Voted to authorize the Moderator to appoint a committee 
of five (5) members and authorize it to make arrangements and to spend 
money appropriated under Article 3 for the observance of Memorial Day. 

ARTICLE 64. Voted to accept the following named sums as Perpetual 
Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof or as may be necessary to be used for said care, viz; 

Theodore Suereth Lot $200.00 

Conners-Barcello Lot 100.00 

Ernest Elsemore Lot 100.00 

Charles & Gladys Clougherty Lot 600.00 

Walter & Elizabeth Lefbvre Lot 200.00 

Robert Chase Lot 400.00 

Audry Tighe Lot 100.00 

Donald Wallace Lot 120.00 

Adele Duffy Lot 100.00 

Byron Reed Lot 20.00 

Bullard-Hughes Lot 200.00 

Burgess P. Standley Lot 800.00 

Ewan Cebrowski Lot 600.00 

Charles Cain Lot 400.00 

Mildred Rossi Lot 150.00 

Wiley Scribner Lot 100.00 



249 



A resolution commending the Warrant Committee on the new 
policy of presenting both minority and majority reports was accepted. 

Voted that the meeting be dissolved. 10:25 p.m. 
A True copy attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 

Town Clerk 

Approval by the Attorney General of Articles 20, 21 and 34 which 
were voted by the Town Meeting Commencing on March 6, 1972. 

July 18, 1972 
Boston, Mass. 

The within amendments to general by-laws (Articles 20, 21 and 34 
are hereby approved. 

ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 

Approval by the Attorney General of Article 55 which was voted 
by the Town Meeting commencing on March 6, 1972. 

July 18, 1972 
Boston, Mass. 

The within amendment to zoning by-law (Article 55) is hereby ap- 
proved WITH THE EXCEPTION of the first and second amendments 
to the main motion adopted on the floor of the Town Meeting which are 
STRICKEN AND DELETED THEREFROM. 

ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 
A True copy, attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 
Town Clerk 



Copies of the Zoning By-law were posted for inspection at the: 

Medfield Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk's Office 
Medfield Public Library 
Medfield Post Office 
Harding Post Office 



250 



WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NORFOLK, S.S. 

To either of the constables of the Town of Medfield, Greeting: 
In the name of the Commonwealth you are herby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Pri- 
maries to meet in 

THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-FIFTH DAY OF APRIL, 1972, at 10:00 
o'clock a.m., for the following purposes : 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of 
Candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

m 

20 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Demo- 
cratic Party. 

12 Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the 
Democratic Party. 

10 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Repub- 
lican Party. 

10 Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the 
Republican Party. 

7 District Delegates to the National Convention of the Democratic 
Party. 

10th Congressional District. 

4 Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the 
Democratic Party. 

10th Congressional District. 

2 District Delegates to the National Convention of the Republi- 
can Party. 

10th Congressional District. 

2 Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the 
Republican Party. 



251 



10th Congressional District. 

District Members of State Committee (one man and one 
woman) for each Political Party for the Middlesex & 

Norfolk Senatorial District. 

35 Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

35 Members of the Republican Town Committee. 

The polls will open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this fourth day of April, A.D., 1972 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTI 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 

Selectmen of Medfield 
A True copy, Attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 
Town Clerk 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Medfield, Massachusetts 

April 15, 1972 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet 
at the time and for the purpose named by posting attested copies of 
said Warrant in not less than five public places in the Town at least 
seven days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WILLIAM H. MANN 
Constable of Medfield 



252 



Presidential Primary 

APRIL 25, 1972 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant the meeting was held at the 
Memorial School on Tuesday, the 25th day of April, 1972 at 10:00 A.M. 
The Warrant was read, the ballots delivered to the clerks and the polls 
declared open. The ballot box had been previously examined and found 
to be in good working order, specimen ballots and cards of instructions 
were posted both inside and outside the polling place and the following 
election officers were sworn in and assigned to their duties: 

John Ganley, Warden; Clara DeNucci, Deputy Warden; Nancy Pres- 
ton, Clerk; Marie Burke, Deputy Clerk; Mary Mair Etienne, Inspector; 
Florence Roberts, Deputy Inspector distributing ballots; Anna Murphy 
and Beatrice Bangs, Inspector and Deputy Inspector at the ballot box. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 1095. Democrats 734, Republicans 361. 

This included 28 absentee ballots. 

After the final tabulation was made, the results were announced as 
follows : 

DEMOCRATIC BALLOT 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Shirley Chisholm 20 

Edward T. Coll 

Vance Hartke 

Hubert H. Humphrey 41 

Henry M. Jackson 9 

John V. Lindsay 

Eugene McCarthy 4 

George McGovern 503 

Wilbur D. Mills 17 

Edmund S. Muskie 94 

George C. Wallace 36 

Sam Yorty 1 

Kennedy 6 

Blanks 3 

DELEGATES AT LARGE 

Robert F. Drinan, Fall River 478 

Mary I. Bunting, Cambridge 451 

Jack H. Backman, Brookline 449 

Ellen M. Jackson, Boston 448 

J. Kenneth Galbraith, Cambridge 456 

Roberta F. Benjamin, Belmont 446 



253 



John .]. Saltonstall, Jr., Boston 465 

Ruth M. Bat son, Boston 444 

Alvin Levin, Lincoln 444 

Mary E. Williamson, Ipswich 448 

Charles F. McDevitt, Framingham 462 

Mary A. Markel, Springfield 443 

Jesse Parks, Springfield 444 

Doris M. Kanin, Norwood 463 

Salvador E. Luria, Lexington 446 

F. Christopher Arterton, Newton 449 

Patricia A. Simon, Newton 451 

Elizabeth A. Chase, West Brookfield 448 

Antonia H. Chayes, Cambridge 446 

Margaret V. Eagan, Chelmsford 446 

Kevin H. White, Boston 137 

Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., Cambridge 111 

Robert H. Quinn, Boston 119 

Doris Kearns, Cambridge 104 

Lena Saunders, Boston 95 

Robert Q. Crane, Wellesley 117 

David M. Bartley, Holyoke 113 

Kevin B. Harrington, Salem 117 

Mary L. Fonseca, Fall River 114 

Geraldine Pleshaw, Quincy 100 

Salvatore Camelio, Belmont 101 

Ronald Glover, Boston 99 

Samuel H. Beer, Cambridge 104 

Betty Taymor, Newton 104 

Ann L. Dunphy, Northampton 104 

Melvin B. Miller, Boston 101 

K. Dun Gifford, Nantucket 104 

Nicholas Mavroules, Peabody 99 

Irene Lambert, Haverhill 102 

Anna P. Buckley, Brockton 108 

George G. Burke, Quincy 22 

Endicott Peabody, Cambridge 19 

Blanks 3459 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

Alexander Rodriguez, Boston 451 

Kenneth J. Moynihan, Worcester 455 

Karl H. Haag, Longmeadow 445 

Constance Kantar, Newton 455 

Carl K. King, Marblehead 543 

Anne P. Priest, Lincoln 448 

Stephen J. Morgan, Somerville 446 

Monteal M. Yerby, Wayland 443 

Francis E. Moore, Attleboro 450 



254 



Sandra L. Ahlburn, Springfield 444 

Kathleen K. Houton, Boston 444 

Michael J. Brower, Cambridge 442 

John F. X. Davoren, Milford 127 

Archibald Cox, Wayland 101 

Elizabeth Parnes, Newton 99 

Frank J. Manning, Boston 97 

Alfred Olerio, Belmont 95 

Barbara J. Garvey, Springfield 101 

Jack E. Robinson, Boston 95 

James E. Smith, Lynn 99 

Susan Haar, Cambridge 96 

Peter Edelman, Newton 96 

James F. Mulloney, Marlborough 99 

Margaret M. Breen, Cambridge 98 

Blanks 2229 

DISTRICT DELEGATES — 10th CONGRESSIONAL 

Joseph Prenda, Jr., Fall River 27 

John Frank, Taunton 24 

David E. Hare, Fall River 19 

Marie D. McFadden, Wellesley 29 

Delores Medeiros, Fall River 24 

Errol G. Duplessis, Natick 25 

Nathilda Souza, Fall River 23 

William P. Grant, Fall River 16 

John J. Long, Fall River 21 

Carlton Viveiros, Fall River 18 

Theodore J. Alexio, Jr., Taunton 15 

Patrick H. Harrington, Somerset 19 

Joseph E. Hanify, Jr., Fall River 17 

Francis J. Gillan, Jr., Attleboro 19 

Dennis A. Smith, Sharon . 75 

Barbara F. Burke, Norfolk 80 

Edward P. Grace, Fall River 72 

Winnie Aronson, Wellesley 83 

Robert L. McCarthy, East Bridgewater 71 

Janine M. Corr, Taunton 70 

Matthew J. Kuss, Jr., Fall River 67 

Bertram A. Yaffee, Fall River 423 

Max Volterra, Attleboro 410 

Helen L. Donnelly, Dighton 416 

Lillian D. Savage, Sharon 417 

Judith A. Rapoza, Fall River 413 

Stephen S. Porter Wellesley 412 

John T. Harney, Medfield 433 

Antone S. Aguiar, Swansea 18 

Blanks 1382 



255 



\l TERNATE DISTRICT DELEGATES 10th CONGRESSIONAL 

Charles J. Resevick, Bridgewater 20 

Margaret E. Leary, Fall River 21 

Joan M. Crotty, Mansfield 21 

Bradley C. Glidden, Wellesley 21 

Gladys Driscoll, FaJl River 20 

Gloria Gaudelte, Fall River 17 

Norma A. O'Leary, Natiek 23 

Jane M. Casey, Attleboro 17 

Richard J. Healy, Jr. 76 

Jane C. Edmonds, Sharon 72 

Manuel H. Camara, Jr., Fall River 75 

Dorothy S. Young, Natiek 74 

Eugene J. Dionne, Jr., Fall River 409 

Kevin D. Preston, Plainville 412 

Phyllis M. Stock 417 

Lillian C. Darmody, Fall River 404 

Blanks 837 

STATE COMMITTEE — MIDDLESEX AND NORFOLK (MAN) 

Hugh L. Burns, Jr. 89 

John J. Hart, Natiek 110 

J. Gerald Ryan, Franklin 82 

Arthur M. Tiernan, Jr., Needham 173 

Blanks 280 

STATE COMMITTEE— MIDDLESEX AND NORFOLK (WOMAN) 

Winnie Aronson, Wellesley 298 

Mary F. Gilleran, Natiek 196 

Blanks 240 

TOWN COMMITTEE 

Leo F. Kelly, 22 Winter St. 484 

Camille M. Sandberg, 219 South St. 444 

Carl E. Sandberg, 219 South St. 448 

Jane N. Kelly, 22 Winter St. 463 

Ralph C. Good, Jr., 10 Arnold Drive 465 

Arthur F. McEvoy, 161 Spring St. 454 

L. Lee DeSorgher, 23 Summer St. 510 

Margaret H. Laughlin, 18 Laurel Drive 444 

Evora DeMartino, 28 Lowell Mason Rd. 454 

John L. DeMartino, Jr., 28 Lowell Mason Rd. 451 

Alma Richards, 3 Johns Ave. 445 

Mary T. Nyren, 7 Johns Ave. 448 

Elizabeth A. Ippoliti, 8 Castle Ave. 455 

Archie C. Richards, 3 Johns Ave. 428 

Peter P. Vasaturo, 1 Emerson Rd. 491 

John T. Harney, 5 Laurel Dr. 465 



256 






John Francis Ganley, 15 Lowell Mason Rd. 456 

Elizabeth A. Ekstrom, 15 Hospital Rd. 470 

John O. Ekstrom, 15 Hospital Rd. 457 

Phyllis A. Ganley, 15 Lowell Mason Rd. 457 

Agnes L. Broderick, 18 Lowell Mason Rd. 436 

Margaret M. Vasaturo, 1 Emerson Rd. 485 

Steven M. Rudnick, 3 Haven Rd. 422 

Mary Sharon Ganley, 15 Low T ell Mason Rd. 485 

Martin Vincent Foley, 4 Laurel Dr. 419 

Anthony T. Petrocca, 11 Cedar Lane 450 

Dorothy A. Petrocca, 11 Cedar Lane 461 

Paula R. Cosby, 361 Main St. 436 

Elizabeth C. Roberts, 8 Pheasant Rd. 443 

Sheila M. Balboni, 6 Cedar Lane 444 

Theresa A. Calderaro, 1 Maplewood Rd. 440 

Clara A. DeNucci, 63 Frairy St. 453 

Joan M. Gomes, 80 Blacksmith Dr. 440 

Milton P. Shaw, 27 Marlyn Rd. 438 

Mary Harney, 5 Laurel Dr. 474 

Scattered 1 

Blanks 9774 

REPUBLICAN BALLOT 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

John M. Ashbrook 12 

Paul N. McCloskey, Jr. 63 

Richard M. Nixon 267 

Scattered 9 

Blanks 10 

DELEGATES AT LARGE 

Francis W. Sargent, Dover 323 

Elizabeth E. Amesbury, Wellesley 296 

Lloyd B. Waring, Rockport 295 

Margaret M. Donohue, Boston 284 

Ann C. Gannett, Wayland 289 

Robert C. Hahn, Stoughton 286 

Elliot L. Richardson, Brookline 312 

Leverett Saltonstall, Dover 323 

John A. Volpe, Boston 312 

Jaye A. Whittier, Boston 288 

Blanks 602 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

William F. Arrigal, Boston 280 

Muriel Erna Ballantine, Boston 276 

Ann R. Blackham, Winchester 279 

Ronald Burton, Framingham 285 



257 



Hastings Keith, West Bridgewater 295 

Paula E. Logan, Cohassct 278 

Josephine C. Marootte, Granby 278 

F. Bradford Morse, Lowell 298 

Martha Rcardon, Cambridge 280 

Emily R. Terlizzi, Melrose 274 

Blanks 787 

DISTRICT DELEGATES — 10th DISTRICT 

Margaret M. Heckler, Wellesley 322 

Aileen H. Belford, Fall River 282 

Blanks 118 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES — 10th DISTRICT 

John S. Ames, III, Easton 290 

Virginia E. Hillman, North Attleborough 278 

Blanks 154 

STATE COMMITTEE (Man) Middlesex and Norfolk 

William C. Green, Dover 220 

H. Philip Garrity, Jr., Needham 89 

Blanks 52 

STATE COMMITTEE (Woman) Middlesex and Norfolk 

Alice M. Roodkowsky, Natick 283 

Blanks 78 

TOWN COMMITTEE 

William P. Mikelonis, 17 Emerson Rd. 273 

Frances D. Aley, 12 Stagecoach Rd. 271 

Jeanne M. Mikelonis, 17 Emerson Rd. 264 

Weston G. Kolsti, 9 Charlesdale Rd. 285 

Nathalie W. Thomas, 101 High St. 267 

Roberta Kolsti, 9 Charlesdale Rd. 277 

Richard G. Connors, 45 Curve St. 293 

Jane E. Minesinger, 38 Orchard St. 284 

Elmer O. Portmann, Jr., 16 Stagecoach Rd. 277 

E. Augusta Cain, 11 Pleasant St. 284 

Edward P. Jenkins, 87 Adams St. 276 

Donald H. Harding, 16 Arnold Dr. 276 

Robert H. Luke, Jr., 10 Causeway St. 285 

Charles H. Peck, 6 Charlesdale Rd. 271 

Warren E. Sheard, 64 Orchard St. 275 

Richard M. Heiligmann, 11 Cross St. 282 

Richard F. Kaerwer, 39 Bridge St. 283 

Thomas J. Shire, 3 Cypress St. 269 

Carlene M. Nourse, 50 North St. 272 

William F. Ncurse. 50 North St. 281 



258 



Mabelle E. Maguire, 33 Orchard St. 289 

Stephanie C. Peck, 6 Charlesdale Rd. 270 

Dwight E. Adams, 22 Miller St. 284 

Jeannette C. Lovelace, 114 South St. 299 

Robert C. Bryan, Jr., 5 Cross St. 272 

Scattered 5 

Blanks 5671 

After the results were publicly announced ,the ballots, tally sheets 
and master sheet were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping 
as prescribed by law. 

A True copy. Attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 

Town Clerk 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elec- 
tions and in Town affairs to meet at the Amos Clark Jingsbury School, 
in said Medfield, on Monday, the fifteenth day of May A.D., 1972 at 
7:30 P.M. then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of pay- 
ing 1971 longevity payments to certain members of the Police Depart- 
ment, or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 2. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and/or transfer from available funds, for the purpose of purch- 
asing a Breathalyzer for the use of the Police Department, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

259 



ARTICLE 3. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and or transfer from available funds, for the purpose of purch- 
asing a Video-Tape Recorder for the use of the Police Department, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds the sum of Seven Hundred and Fifty 
Dollars ($750.00) to Account A134-00 Council on Aging, 500 Equipment, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Council on Aging) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of Seven 
Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($750.00) from Account A125-00 Board of 
Health, 100 Personnel, to Account A125-00 Board of Health, 200 Opera- 
tions, or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Health) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if ihe Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of pay- 
ing an unpaid 1971 bill to Boston Edison Company, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. (Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds the sum of Four Hundred and Ninety- 
eight Dollars ($498.00) for the purpose of paying land damages arising 
from the relocation of North Street, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Ad- 
ministration Plan by making the following additions to the Classifica- 
tion of Positions and Pay Schedules: 

under FULL TIME POSITIONS, 

Rate Range 
Position Minimum 2nd step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 
-Chief $9,600. $10,200 $10,800. $11,400. $12,000. 

and the following PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS, 

Positions Rate 

Fire: Deputy Chief $600.00 per year. 

Fire: Captain 200.00 per year. 

Fire: Lieutenant 150.00 per year. 

Fire: Clerk 150.00 per year. 

Fire: Call $3.30 to $3.50 per hour 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 9. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and/or transfer from available funds to Account A112-01 Admin- 
istration of Fire Department, 100 Personnel, for the purpose of provid- 
ing a salary increase to the Fire Chief, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 



260 






ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Zoning By-law 
a Section 7, Signs, or adopt as Article VIII of the General By-laws, the 
following: 

SIGNS 

7.1 PURPOSE 

This section is adopted for the regulation and restriction within 
various zoning districts of the Town of Medfield of billboards, 
signs, and other advertising devices on public ways or on 
private property within public view of a public way, public 
park or reservation. This section shall not apply to signs ex- 
empted by Section 32 of Chapter 93 of the General Laws. 

7.2 REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 

7.2.1 "R" Districts 

In any residential district, no exterior signs shall be 
permitted except those pertaining to the lease or sale 
of a lot or building on which placed, and not exceeding a 
total area of twelve square feet; and/or on a lot occu- 
pied by a dwelling there shall not be more than one 
sign pertaining to the use thereof or bearing the name 
and occupation of any occupant or occupants, and no 
such sign shall exceed two square feet in area; and 
for premises used for home occupations, no exterior 
signs other than a small nonelectrical sign not to ex- 
ceed two square feet in area, and carrying only the 
name and occupation of any occupant of the premises 
such as a physician, artisan, beautician, lawyer, archi- 
tect, engineer, clergyman, accountant, osteopath, den- 
tist, and similar occupations or professions, as provided 
under Section 13.10.2(e) of the Zoning By-law passed 
at the Annual Town Meeting March 1972. Signs per- 
mitted by this paragraph shall not obstruct visual 
clearance at intersecting streets within the area pro- 
vided by paragraph 6.3.2 of this By-law. 

7.2.2 Industrial Districts 

7.2.2. (a) In a Business-Industrial (B-I) District, the 
following exterior signs and no others are 
permitted: 

(I) One sign for each fifty (50) feet, or 
fraction thereof, of lot frontage on the 
principal street, or for each separate 
and distinct establishment on the prem- 
ises, provided that the aggregate area 
of all such signs shall not exceed one 
hundred (100) square feet for each said 



261 



unit of frontage. In a Business-Indus- 
trial (B-I) District no such signs shall 
be located nearer to the street line 
than the permitted setback distance for 
a building on the same lot. 

7.2.2. (b) In an Industrial-Extensive (I-E) District the 
following exterior signs and no others are 
permitted: 

(I) One sign for each one hundred (100) 
feet, or fraction thereof, of lot frontage 
on the principal street, provided that the 
aggregate area of all such signs shall 
not exceed one hundred (100) square 
feet for each unit of frontage. No such 
sign shall be located nearer to the street 
line than the permitted setback distance 
for a building on the same lot. 

7.2.2. (c) In both the Business-Industrial (B-I) and the 
Industrial Extensive (I-E), no exterior sign, 
shall have a height greater than the highest 
point on the roof of the main building to 
which it pertains, or greater than twenty-five 
(25) feet above the mean grade of the curb of 
the principal frontage street, whichever is 
highest. 

7.2.2. (d) In both the Business-Industrial (B-I) and the 
Industrial Extensive (I-E), no exterior sign, 
and no interior sign readily visible from the 
exterior of a building, shall be illuminated by 
other than a steady light (with no flashing 
or other interruption.) No exterior sign shall 
be rotated, oscillated, or otherwise regularly 
moved, or shall be designed to turn or flutter 
in the wind, or shall in any way be other 
than stationary. 

7.2.2. (e) For the purpose of this Section, an exterior 
sign is any structure or part thereof located 
outside of a building, or any device attached 
to or printed or represented on the exterior 
of a building or structure (including, but not 
limited to display signs) which shall display 
or include any letter, word, model, banner, 
flag, pennant, insignia, device or other re- 
presentation used as, or which is in the na- 
ture of, an announcement, direction or adver- 



262 



tisement. Where a sign consists of individual 
letters, insignia or other individual represen- 
tations, the area of the sign shall be consid- 
ered to be that of the smallest rectangle 
which encompasses all of said letters, insignia 
or other representations. 

7.2.2. (f) Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, ex- 
terior signs which indicate necessary direc- 
tions only (such as "entrance", "exit", or 
"parking") or are required for safety pur- 
poses, shall be exempt from the provisions of 
this Section, provided that each such sign has 
an area of not over two (2) square feet and 
is unlighted, or illuminated only by steady 
white light. Posters (including price tags) 
which are attached to merchandise lawfully 
displayed shall also be exempt, provided that 
each such poster has an area of not over 
one (1) square foot. 

or take any action relative thereto. (Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money for constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an addi- 
tion to the high school and a sum of money for the reconstruction, re- 
modeling, rehabilitation and modernization of the existing high school 
structure, and to determine whether such appropriations shall be raised 
by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(School Planning & Building Committee) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken 
under Article 12 of the Annual Town Meeting, 1972 which reads: 

"Voted to direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court to enact legislation to remove the position of Chief of Police 
of the Town of Medfield from the operation of the Civil Service Law, 
exempting the present incumbent." 
or take any action relative thereto. (Police Chief) 

An you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield 
seven (7) days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meet- 
ing aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this second day of May, A.D., Nineteen Hun- 
dred and Seventy-two. 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTI 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 



263 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Medfield, Massachusetts 

May 8, 1972 
NORFOLK, S.S. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Medfield. qualified to vote in elections to meet at 
the time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WILLIAM H. MANN 
Constable of Medfield 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 15, 1972 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:50 P.M. at 
the Amos Clark Kingsbury School, and the following action was taken 
on the articles in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 1. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifty ($50.00) 
Dollars for the purpose of paying 1971 longevity payments to certain 
members of the Police Department. The vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 2. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Eleven Hun- 
dred ($1,100.00) Dollars for the purpose of purchasing a Breathalyzer 
for the use of the Police Department. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted to dismiss this article regarding the purchase of 
a Video-Tape Recorder for the use of the Police Department. 

ARTICLE 4. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Seven Hundred 
and Fifty ($750.00) Dollars to Account A134-00 Council on Aging, 200 
Operations. 

Yes 401 

No 206 

264 



ARTICLE 5. Voted to transfer the sum of Seven Hundred and Fifty 
($750.00) Dollars from Account A125-00 Board of Health, 100 Personnel, 
to Account A125-00 Board of Health, 200 Operations. 

ARTICLE 6. Voted unanimously to raise and appropriate the sum of 
One Thousand Four Hundred and Three Dollars and Eighteen Cents 
($1,403.18) for the purpose of paying an unpaid 1971 bill to Boston Edi- 
son Company. 

ARTICLE 7. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Four Hundred 
and Ninety-eight ($498.00) Dollars for the purpose of paying land dam- 
ages arising from the relocation of North Street. 

RESOLUTION voted by the Meeting. 

That the Selectmen notify the County Commissioners that the 
people of the Town of Medfield demand a moratorium on further 
land takings and lay outs until a complete review of the 
road system in Medfield is completed excluding new Route 27 
now in progress. 

ARTICLE 8. Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan by 
making the following additions to the Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedules : 

Under FULL TIME POSITIONS 

Rate Range 
Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 
*Chief $9,600. $10,200. $10,800. $11,400. $12,000. 

and the following under "PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS, 

Position Rate 

Fire: Deputy Chief $600.00 per year. 

Fire: Captain 200.00 per year. 

Fire: Lieutenant 150.00 per year. 

Fire: Clerk 150.00 per year. 

Fire: Call Firefighter $3.30 to $3.50 per hour. 

ARTICLE 9. Voted to raise and appropriate the sum of Three Hundred 
Fifty ($350.00) Dollars to Account A112-01 Administration of Fire De- 
partment, 100 Personnel, for the purpose of providing a salary increase 
to the Fire Chief. 

Resolution : 

WHEREAS, the appropriation of funds for municipal services 
and the setting of rates of compensation for muni- 
cipal employees are powers properly exercised by 
city councils in cities and town meetings in towns, 
and 



265 



WHEREAS, such powers arc denied to those appropriate legis- 
lative bodies by compulsory or binding arbitration 
of municipal collective bargaining issues, 

The Town Meeting of the Town of Medfield on this 
15th day of May 1972, declares to His Excellency, 
Francis W. Sargent, Governor of the Common- 
wealth; to the Honorable Kevin B. Harrington, 
President of the Massachusetts Senate; and to the 
Honorable David M. Bartley, Speaker of the Massa- 
chusetts House of Representatives, this Town Meet- 
ing's vehement opposition to any legislation which 
would provide for compulsory or binding arbitra- 
tion in any form in municipal collective bargaining. 

ARTICLE 10. Voted unanimously to add to the Zoning By-law a Sec- 
tion 7, Signs SIGNS. 

SIGNS 

7.1 PURPOSE 

This section is adopted for the regulation and restriction within 
various zoning districts of the Town of Medfield of billboards, 
signs, and other advertising devices on public ways or on private 
property within public view of a public way, public park or 
reservation. This section shall not apply to signs exempted by 
Section 32 of Chapter 93 of the General Laws. 

7.2 REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS 

7.2.1 "R" Districts 

In any residential district, no exterior signs shall be 
permitted except those pertaining to the lease or sale 
of a lot or building on which placed, and not exceeding 
a total area of twelve square feet; and/or on a lot 
occupied by a dwelling there shall not be more than one 
sign pertaining to the use thereof or bearing the name 
and occupation of any occupant or occupants, and no 
such sign shall exceed one square foot in area: and for 
premises used for home occupations, no exterior signs 
other than a small nonelectrical sign not to exceed one 
square foot in area, and carrying only the name and 
occupation of any occupant of the premises such as a 
physician, artisan, beautician, lawyer, architect, en- 
gineer, clergyman, accountant, osteopath, dentist, and 
similar occupations or professions, as provided under 
Section 13.10.2(e) of the Zoning By-law passed at the 
Annual Town Meeting March 1972. Signs permitted by 
this paragraph shall not obstruct visual clearance at 



266 



intersecting streets within the area provided by para- 
graph 6.3.2 of this By-law. 

7.2.2 Industrial Districts 

7.2.2. (a) In a Business-Industrial (B-I) District, the 
following exterior signs and no others are 
permitted : 

(I) One sign for each fifty (50) feet, or 
fraction thereof, of lot frontage on the 
principal street, or for each separate and 
distinct establishment on the premises, 
provided that the aggregate area of all 
such signs shall not exceed one hundred 
(100) square feet for each said unit of 
frontage. In a Business-Industrial (B-I) 
District no such signs shall be located 
nearer to the street line than the per- 
mitted setback distance for a building 
on the same lot. 

7.2.2. (b) In an Industrial-Extensive (I-E) District the 
following exterior signs and no others are per- 
mitted: 

(I) One sign for each one hundred (100) 
feet, or fraction thereof, of lot frontage 
on the principal street, provided that the 
aggregate area of all such signs shall 
not exceed one hundred (100) square 
feet for each unit of frontage. No such 
sign shall be located nearer to the 
street line than the permitted setback 
distance for a building on the same lot. 

7.2.2. (c) In both the Business-Industrial (B-I) and the 
Industrial Extensive (I-E), no exterior sign, 
shall have a height greater than the highest 
point on the roof of the main building to 
which it pertains, or greater than twenty- 
five (25) feet above the mean grade of the 
curb of the principal frontage street, which- 
ever is highest. 

7.2.2. (d) In both the Business-Industrial (B-I) and the 
Industrial Extensive (I-E), no exterior sign, 
and no interior sign readily visible from the 
exterior of a building, shall be illuminated by 



267 



other than a steady light (with no flashing or 
other interruption.) No exterior sign shall be 
rotated, oscillated, or otherwise regularly 
moved, or shall be designed to turn or flutter 
in the wind, or shall in any way be other than 
stationary. 

7.2.2. (e) For the purpose of this Section, an exterior 
sign is any structure or part thereof located 
outside of a building, or any device attached 
to or printed or represented on the exterior 
of a building or structure (including, but not 
limited to display signs) which shall display 
or include any letter, word, model, banner, 
flag, pennant, insignia, device or other repre- 
sentation used as, or which is in the nature 
of, an announcement, direction or advertise- 
ment. Where a sign consists of individual 
letters, insignia or other individual represen- 
tations, the area of the sign shall be consid- 
ered to be that of the smallest rectangle 
which encompasses all of said letters, insig- 
nia or other representations. 

7.2.2.(f) Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, ex- 
terior signs which indicate necessary direc- 
tions only (such as "entrance", "exit", or 
"parking") or are required for safety pur- 
poses, shall be exempt from the provisions of 
this Section, provided that each such sign has 
an area of not over two (2) square feet and 
is unlighted, or illuminated only by steady 
white light. Posters (including price tags) 
which are attached to merchandise lawfully 
displayed shall also be exempt, provided that 
each such poster has an area of not over one 
(1) square foot. 

ARTICLE 11. Voted to dismiss this article wherein a sum of money 
was sought for an addition to the high school and remodeling of the 
present high school. 

Yes 343 

No 353 

ARTICLE 12. Voted to dismiss this article seeking to rescind the 
action taken under Article 12 of the Annual Town Meeting, 1972. 



268 



RESOLVED: 

We have an important issue to compile data on this evening re- 
garding our school system. (I think) Both the minority reports and 
the people from the floor reiterated the question of need is there. (I) 
would hope that the proponents and opponents would get together and 
be able to come back in the Fall with some sort of presentation to 
the voters. 

The meeting was dissolved at 10:45. 

A True Copy, Attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 

Town Clerk 

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S APPROVAL OF ARTICLE 10 

August 15, 1972 
Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendment to Zoning By-laws adopted under Article 
10 is approved. 

ROBERT H. QUINN 
Attorney General 






269 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elec- 
tions and in Town affairs to meet at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School, 
in said Medfield, on Monday, the nineteenth day of June A.D., 1972 at 
7:30 P.M. then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money for constructing and originally equipping and furnishing an 
addition to the high school and a sum of money for the reconstruction, 
remodeling, rehabilitation and modernization of the existing high school 
structure, and to determine whether such appropriations shall be raised 
by borrowing or otherwise, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(School Planning & Building Committee) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to appopriate a sum of 
money for renovations, remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordin- 
ary repairs to the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School under the provi- 
sions of Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, or otherwise, and determine 
whether such sum shall be raised in part by borrowing, by transferring 
from the stabilization fund or other available funds or otherwise, or 
take any othe raction relative thereto. 

(School Planning & Building Committee) 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen 
to appoint a school building study committee to study means and methods 
of accommodating present and anticipated pupil populations; to employ 
consultants, make site investigations and obtain plans necessary for 
making a comprehensive report to the Town, and to see what sum the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or borrow and/or transfer 
from available funds for the purposes of this article or take any other 
action relative thereto. (School Planning & Building Committee) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to form a School Survey 
Committee, to be appointed by the Moderator, to consist of one member 
from the School Committee, one member from the School Planning and 
Building Committee one member from the Finance Committee, one 
member from the Planning Board and three members at large, said 
committee to be charged with the responsibility of making an in-depth 
study of the Town's public school curriculum, facilities and management, 
to make recommendations, and that said committee be empowered to 






270 



retain consultants to assist with carrying out the purposes of this article 
and that a sum of money, to be expended over a three-year period, be 
raised and appropriated, transferred from available funds, and/or bor- 
rowed for this purpose cr take any other action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield 
seven (7) days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this eighth day of June A.D., Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-two. 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTI 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 
Selectmen of Medfield 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Medfield, Massachusetts 

June 12, 1972 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at 
the time and for the purpose named by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Med- 
field at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WILLIAM H. MANN 

Constable of Medfield 



271 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
June 19, 1972 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 8:10 P.M. 
after allowing extra time for the near capacity crowd to be checked in. 
The following action was then taken on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. Voted to dismiss this article relative to the constructing 
and originally equipping and furnishing an addition to the high school, 
and a sum of money for the reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitation and 
modernization of the existing high school. 

Yes 579 

No 492 

( an amendment for a 20 year bond issue was also defeated) 

Yes 536 

No 475 

ARTICLE 2. Voted that the sum of $63,000.00 be appropriated for the 
purpose of repairing the roof of the existing High School. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted to dismiss this article wherein the appointment of 
a school building study committee was sought. 

ARTICLE 4. Voted to dismiss this article wherein the formation of 
a School Survey Committee was sought. 

Voted that the meeting be adjourned at 11:45 P.M. 

A True Copy, Attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 

Town Clerk 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR THE STATE PRIMARY 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said county, 
greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 

and warn the inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to meet in Memorial School, Adams Street 



272 



TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 1972 

at 10 o'clock A.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination 
of Candidates of Political Parties for the following offices: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 
REPRESENTATIVE IN 

CONGRESS 
COUNCILLOR 
SENATOR 
ONE REPRESENTATIVE IN 

GENERAL COURT 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

AND INSOLVENCY 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 
COUNTY TREASURER 



For this Commonwealth 
10th Congressional District 
2nd Councillor District 
Middlesex & Norfolk Senatorial 

District 
10th Norfolk Representative 

District 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 
Norfolk County 



The polls will be open from 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 22nd day of August, A.D., 1972. 



HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTI 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 



A True Copy, Attest 



Selectmen of Medfield 

WILLIAM H. MANN, Constable 
September 5, 1972 



273 



STATE PRIMARIES 
September 19, 1972 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, the meeting was opened at 
10:00 A.M.. and after the reading of the Warrant and Constable's Return 
the polls were declared open. The ballot box had been previously ex- 
amined and found to be in good working order, instructions to voters 
and specimen ballots were posted according to law and election officials 
equally apportioned from the two major parties were sworn in and as- 
signed to their duties. John Francis Ganley, Warden; Clara DeNucci, 
Deputy Warden; Nancy Preston, Clerk; Marie Burke, Deputy Clerk; 
Mary Mair Etienne, Inspector; Evelyn Gronberg, Checker; Beatrice 
Bangs, Checker; Anna Murphy, Checker. Tellers for the counting and 
tabulating of ballots were as follows: Mary Mair Etienne, Beatrice Bangs, 
Anna Murphy, Jane Minesinger. Clara DeNucci, Evelyn Gronberg, Mae 
Maguire, and Mary Lovell. The ballots were removed from the ballot 
box after the polls were closed and after counting, the final tabulation 
was publically announced as follows: 

Total number of votes cast was 333. 

Republican — 154 (includes 1 absentee) 

Democrat ■ — 179 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward W. Brooke, 535 Beacon St., Newton 136 

Blanks 18 

CONGRESSMAN 

Margaret M. Heckler, 30 Colburn Rd., Wellesley 145 
Blanks 9 

COUNCILLOR 



Charles J. Laubstein, 5 Myopia Rd., Boston 


132 


Blanks 


22 


SENATOR 




David H. Locke, 15 Ordway Rd., Wellesley 


141 


Blanks 


13 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 




Charles W. Long, 106 Pond St., Westwood 


148 


Blanks 


6 



REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY 

Blanks 153 



274 



Scattered 1 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 

George H. Ferran, 929 Webster St., Needham 126 

Blanks 182 

COUNTY TREASURER 

Blanks 154 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

John J. Droney, 328 Broadway, Cambridge 74 

John Pierce Lynch, 5 Ridgewood Ter., Springfield 19 

Gerald F. O'Leary, 1110 Morton St., Boston 75 

Blanks 11 

CONGRESSMAN 

Blanks 179 

COUNCILLOR 

Herbert L. Connolly, 80 Claremont St., Newton 121 
Bernard J. Corcoran, 148 Chapman St., Watertown 18 

Richard E. Kenney, 18 Corcoran Drive, Boston 19 

Blanks 21 

SENATOR 

Blanks 179 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Thomas P. McCuster, Jr., 

33 Brookfield Rd., Westwood 151 

Blanks 28 

REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY 

Warren R. Blackadar, 18 Greenwood Ave., Stoughton 6 

Thomas F. Cavanaugh, 42 Windsor Rd., Norwood 11 

Harold Davis, 176 Presidents Lane, Quincy 10 

Robert G. Donoghue, 50 Pleasant St., Brookline 7 

Paul C. Gay, 501 North St., Walpole 87 

Paul P. Hayes, Jr., 263 Elm St., Braintree 3 

Joseph P. McDonough, 65 A Miller St., Quincy 2 

Robert M. Murphy, 34 York Way, Westwood 39 

John J. Sullivan, 23 Marion St., Quincy 7 

Blanks 7 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 

James J. Collins, 63 Governors Rd., Milton 137 

George D. McDonald, 133 Grove St., Quincy 104 

Blanks 117 



275 



COUNTY TREASURER 

James M. Collins. 1118 Brook Rd., Milton 93 

Joseph G. Graziani. Jr., 46 Houston Ave., Milton 33 
Joseph J. LaRaia, 54 Grogan Avo., Quincy 19 

James F. McCormick, Sr., 100 Reservoir Rd., Quincy 20 
Blanks 14 

After the results were announced, the ballots, tally sheets, etc. 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safe keeping as prescribed by 
law. 

A True Copy, Attest: 

NANCY J. PRESTON 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT 

STATE ELECTION 

Tuesday, November 7, 1972 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elec- 
tions to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield on 

TUESDAY NEXT AFTER THE FIRST MONDAY IN NOVEMBER, 

IT BEING THE SEVENTH DAY OF SAID MONTH, IN 

THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND 

SEVENTY-TWO AT 6:00 A.M. 



276 



in the forenoon to bring in their votes for the following officers and 
questions, to wit : 

President and Vice-President; Senator in Congress; Representative to 
Congress; Councillor; Senator; Representative in General Court; Regis- 
ter of Probate and Insolvency; County Commissioner (2) ; (except in 
Suffolk and Nantucket Counties) ; County Treasurer. 

QUESTION & SUMMARIES 

Question No. 1 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Consti- 
tution summarized below, which was approved by the General Court 
in a joint session of the two branches held June 18, 1969, received 221 
votes in the affirmative and 22 in the negative, and in a joint session of 
the two branches held May 12, 1971, received 238 votes in the affirmative 
and 14 in the negative? 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to enact 
a law that agricultural and horticultural lands shall be valued, for taxa- 
tion purposes, according to their agricutural or horticultural uses. No 
parcel of land less than five acres which has not been actively devoted to 
such uses for two years preceding the tax year could be valued at less 
than fair market value. 

Question No. 2 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a 
joint session of the two 'branches held June 18, 1969, received 143 votes 
in the affirmative and 113 in the negative, and in a joint session of the 
two branches held May 12, 1971, received 243 votes in the affirmative and 
11 in the negative. 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would bring the State Constitution into 
conformity with the 26th Amendment to the Constitution of the United 
States by setting the minimum age for voting at eighteen. 



277 



Question No. S 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a 
joint session of the two branches held June 18, 1969, received 258 votes 
in the affirmative and in the negative, and in a joint session of the 
two branches held May 12. 1971, received 262 votes in the affirmative 
and 1 in the negative? 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would remove the prohibition against 
paupers from voting. 
Question No. 4 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a 
joint session of the two branches held June 18, 1969, received 264 votes 
in the affirmative and 1 in the negative, and in a joint session of the 
two branches held May 12, 1971, received 264 votes in the affirmative 
and in the negative? 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to enact 
a law to permit the Commonwealth to make loans for tuition and board 
at any college, university or institution of higher learning to students 
who are residents of the Commonwealth. 

Question No. 5 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a 
joint session of the two branches held August 5, 1969, received 239 votes 
in the affirmative and in the negative, and in a joint session of the two 
branches held May 12, 1971, received 266 votes in the affirmative and 
in the negative. 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would annul Article 49 of the Articles of 
Amendment to the Constitution and substitute a new amendment which 



278 






declares that the people have the right to clean air and water, freedom 
from excessive and unnecessary noise, and the natural, scenic, historic 
and esthetic qualities of their environment. It further declares that the 
protection of the right to the conservation, development and utilization 
of the agricultural, mineral, forest, water, air and other natural resources 
ios a public purpose. The Legislature is authorized to adopt necessary 
legislation and to provide for eminent domain takings where required 
for the purposes of the amendment. Any property so taken may only be 
used for other purposes or disposed of upon a two-thirds vote of the 
Legislature. 

Question No. 6 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a 
joint session of the two branches held June 18, 1968, received 198 votes 
in the affirmative and 49 in the negative, and in a joint session of the 
two branches held May 12, 1971, received 245 votes in the affirmative and 
20 in the negative. 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would authorize, but not require, the 
Legislature to modify the Massachusetts income tax laws by the use of 
graduated rates instead of the present flat or uniform rates. The Legis- 
lature could do this in any one of three ways: 

1. Apply a uniform rate or percentage to an individual's federal 
income tax liability; or 

2. Apply graduated rates to an individual's federal taxable in- 
come; or 

3. Apply graduated rates to income determined to be taxable 
under Massachusetts law. 

The Legislature would also be authorized to provide for reasonable 
exemptions, deductions and abatements and make the definition of any 
term used in the state tax law automatically the same as it is under 
Federal Law. 

Question No. 7 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion summarized below, which was approved by the General Court in a 
joint session of the two branches held June 16, 1969, received 198 votes 
in the affirmative and 63 in the negative, and in a joint session of the 



279 



two branches held May 12, 1971, received 231 votes in the affirmative 

and 31 in the negative? 

YES 
NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would require that all judges must retire 
upon reaching seventy years of age. 

Question No. 8 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of an act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and seventy-two, entitled "An Act Lowering to eighteen 
years the age requirement of a person licensed to sell or allowed to 
purchase alcoholic beverages? 

YES 
NO 

Question No. 9 

"Shall the voluntary recitation of prayer be authorized in the public 
schools of the Commonwealth?" 

YES 
NO 

THE POLLS WILL BE OPEN FROM 6:00 A.M. TO 8:00 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual places for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven 
(7) days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

wm 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your 
doings thereon unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of October, A.D., Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-two. 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTI 
JOSEPH L. MARCIONETTE 

Selectmen of Medfield 



280 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Medfield, Massachusetts 



October 30, 1972 



NORFOLK, S.S. 



By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at 
the time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WILLIAM H. MANN 

Constable of Medfield 



STATE ELECTION 
November 7, 1972 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, the meeting was opened at 6:00 
A.M. by the reading of the Warrant. The ballot box had been opened and 
inspected, a voting list displayed and instruction to voters, specimen 
ballots posted and copies of the questions placed in each voting booth. 
The following persons were sworn in and assigned to their duties: 



Warden 
Deputy Warden 
Clerk 
Checkers 



Additional 
workers : 



John F. Ganley 
Clara DeNucci 
Nancy J. Preston 
Mary Mair Etienne 
Mae Maguire 
Elizabeth Ekstrom 
Evelyn Gronberg 
Anna Murphy 
Beatrice Bangs 
Barbara Connors 
Patricia Champagne 
Mary Lovell 
Muriel Harris 
Beverly Smith 
Jean Sanders 
Jane Minesinger 



Florence Roberts 
Louise Pini 
Frederick Rogers 
Gail Nyren 
Edna Hinkley 
Susan Champagne 

Jeannette Lovelace 
Patricia Holsapple 
Margaret Marr 
Sarah Regan 
Elizabeth Ippoliti 



281 



Tollers for counting ballots after (he polls were closed were: 



Barbara Armstrong 
John DeMartino, Jr. 
Mary I .o veil 
Anna Murphy 
Gail Nyren 
Margaret Marr 
Marsha Downing 
Mae Maguire 
Jane Minesinger 
Patricia Holsapple 
Diane Goucher 
Jean Sanders 
Muriel Harris 
Susan Champagne 



Sheila Balboni 
Clara DeNucci 
Mary Mair Etienne 
Sarah Regan 
Mary S. Ganley 
Steven Rudnick 

Beverly Smith 
William Mikelonis 
Elmer Portmann 
Joan Fuller 
Joseph Canty 
Lynn Randolph 



Theresa Calderaro 
Elizabeth Ippoliti 
Edna McGlynn 
Edna Hinkley 
Jane Kelley 
Mildred Rossi 

Florence Roberts 
Emmy Mitchell 
Roberta Kolsti 
Jonathan Early 
Jeannette Lovelace 
Benjamin Astley 



The polls were declared closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote cast was 4397. This included 259 absentee ballots. 

15 Partial Ballots also included. 

113 in presence of Town Clerk 

146 by mail 

This represented 85.6% of the total registered voters of 5,131. After 
the final tabulation the results were announced as follows: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 



Jearmess and Pulley — (SWP) 
McGovern and Shriver — (D) 
Nixon and Agnew — (R) 
Schmitz and Anderson 
Spock 
Blanks 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward W. Brooke, Newton — (R) 
John J. Droney, Cambridge (D) 
Donald Gurewitz, Cambridge (SWP) 
Blanks 

CONGRESSMAN — 10th DISTRICT 

Margaret M. Heckler, Wellesley (R) 
Blanks 

COUNCILLOR — 2nd DISTRICT 

Herbert L. Connolly, Newton (D) 
Charles J. Laubenstein, Boston (R) 
Blanks 



15 

1724 
2614 

11 
1 

32 



3277 

962 

61 

82 



3627 
755 



2127 

1811 

444 



282 



SENATOR — Middlesex and Norfolk District 

David H. Locke, Wellesley (R) 3445 

Blanks 937 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT — 10th Norfolk Dist. 
Charles W. Long, Westwood (R) 2619 

Thomas P. McCusker, Jr., Westwood (D) 1600 

Blanks 163 

REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY — Norfolk Counts- 
Paul C. Gay, Walpole (D) 3072 
Blanks 1310 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS — Norfolk County 

James J. Collins, Milton (D) 2031 

George B. McDonald, Quincy (D) 1697 

George H. Ferran, Needham (R) 2401 

Blanks 2635 

COUNTY TREASURER — Norfolk County- 
James M. Collins, Milton (D) 3089 
Blanks 1293 

QUESTION NO. 1 — Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Taxation of Agricultural and Horticultural Lands 

Yes 3167 

No 862 

Blanks 353 

QUESTION NO. 2 — Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Lowing the Voting Age to Eighteen 

Yes 3523 

No 595 

Blanks 264 

QUESTION NO. 3 — Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 
Removing the Prohibition Against Paupers from Voting 
Yes 3348 

No 675 

Blanks 359 

QUESTION NO. 4 — Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Loans for Tuition and Board for College Students 

Yes 2757 

No 1363 

Blanks 262 



ISTION N( 


3. 5 — Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 




Clean Air 


Yes 


3515 


No 


529 


Blanks 


348 



283 



QUESTION NO. 6 Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Graduated Income Tax 

Yes 1422 

No 2723 

Blanks 237 

QUESTION NO. 7 Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Judges Retirement at Seventy 

Yes 3343 

No 832 

Blanks 207 

QUESTION NO. 8 — Lowering the Age to Sell or Purchase 
Alcoholic Beverages 
Yes 2278 

No 1822 

Blanks 282 

QUESTION NO. 9 — Voluntary Prayer in Public Schools 
Yes 3536 

No 676 

Blanks 170 

After the complete tabulation of results were announced, the ballots, 
tally sheets, master sheets and voting check lists were turned over to the 
Town Clerk for safe keeping as prescribed by law. The Results were 
posted on a Specimen Ballot at the Town Hall and a complete breakdown 
of the disposition of all Civilian and Serviceman's Ballots was also dis- 
played. 

A True Copy, Attest : 

NANCY J. PRESTON 
Town Clerk 



284 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 11, 1972 

NORFOLK, S.S. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elec- 
tions and in Town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said 
Medfield, on Monday, the eleventh day of December A.D., 1972 at 7:30 
o'clock P.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 8D of Chap- 
ter 40 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth pursuant to which the 
Board of Selectmen may establish an Historical Commission, or take 
any other action relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to repeal the By-law adopted 
March 11, 1963 and amended March 14, 1972 regulating solicitation of 
funds or solicitation of purchase orders by transient persons and to 
adopt as Section 28 of Article IV of the By-laws of the Town of 
Medfield the following: & 

"No transient person shall solicit funds for charitable, veteran or 
fraternal purposes or solicit subscriptions for periodicals or shall 
solicit purchase orders and deposits for restoration or permanent 
preservations of personal articles of intrinsic value or photographs 
or portraits within the Town of Medfield without first having ob- 
tained a permit from the Board of Selectmen. 

"Application for said permit shall be filed with the Police Department 
in duplicate on forms provided by the Town. Immediately upon re- 
ceipt of an application, the Police Department shall transmit one 
copy to the Board of Selectmen, who shall hold a public hearing on 
said application at their next meeting. Notice of the purpose of said 
hearing shall be posted on the principal bulletin board of the Town. 
Within five hours of the conclusion of said hearing, the Board of 
Selectmen shall issue the permit, with such restrictions, conditions 
and limitations as they find necessary for the protection of the appli- 
cant and the citizens of the Town, unless they shall find that the 
applicant or applicants or their employees or agents are of a bad 
moral character or that the issuance of said permit will result in 
danger to the public safety or creation of a nuisance." 

(Board of Selectmen) 



285 



ARTICLE 3. To sec it the Town will vole to transfer from available 
funds the sum of Five Thousand. Six Hundred ($5,600.00) Dollars as the 
Town's Chapter 90 share for the reconstruction of West Street and to 
authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto, said money to be used with funds allotted by the 
County and State, or take any action relative thereto. 

Board of Selectmen ) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to execute a release to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
for the following parcels of town-owned land taken by the Common- 
wealth for the construction of Route 27: 

Parcel Amount of Award 

No. 38 $ 50.48 

6, D-34 100.95 

37 504.75 

32, TS-27, D-56 504.75 

31, TS-26, D-53, D-55 3,735.15 

46, TS-31, D-12 3,533.25 

29 100.95 

16, D-4 210.90 

as shown on plans entitled, "Medfield 1972 Layout No. 5962 prepared by 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works," copies of which are on file 
with the Board of Selectmen, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from available funds for the purpose of repairing the sewer system, or 
take any action relative thereto. (Water & Sewerage Board) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to create a special unpaid 
committee to be known as Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Commit- 
tee consisting of three persons to be appointed by the Moderator, in 
accordance with Chapter 40, Section 44A of the General Laws and raise 
and appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of One 
Hundred ($100.00) Dollars for the use of said committee, cr act in any 
way relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law 
by deleting Section 9.3 or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Section 53C of Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
providing for receipt by the Town of payment for offduty work details by 
members of the Police Department to be expended at the direction of 
the Chief of Police for the purpose of paying police officers for offduty 
work details, and to transfer from available funds the sum of Two Thou- 
sand ($2,000.00) Dollars for the purpose of this article, or take any action 
relative thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

286 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the classification of 
positions and pay schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan so that 
it reads as follows: 

Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules 

REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Special Police Officer $3.30 per hour 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to employ its own members as field appraisers, map reviewers, 
and agents to maintain and update the Board of Assessors' maps and 
records, and to vote to fix the salary of such appointees, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from Account Board of Assessors A105-00, item 200 Operations of the 
Annual Town Meeting of 1972 to Board of Assessors A105-00, item 100 
Personnel, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors ) 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven (7) days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting 
aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twenty-eighth day of November, Nine- 
teen Hundred and Seventy- two. 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTI 
JOSEPH L. MARTIONETTE 
Selectmen of Medfield 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Medfield, Massachusetts 

December 11, 1972 
NORFOLK, S.S. 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections to meet at 
the time and for the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said 
Warrant in not less than five (5) public places in the Town of Medfield 
at least seven (7) days before the time of holding the meeting. 

WILLIAM H. MANN 
Constable of Medfield 

287 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 11, 1972 

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 P.M. in the Dale Street 
School Auditorium by the Moderator after ascertaining that a quorum 
was present. (Quorum 250) The following action was taken on the 
articles in the Warrant: 

ARTICLE 1. Voted to accept Section 8D of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth and that an Historical Commission be es- 
taablished in accordance with the provisions of said section. 

ARTICLE 2. Voted to repeal the By-law adopted March 11, 1963 and 
amended March 14, 1972 regulating solicitation of funds or solicitation of 
purchase orders by transient persons be repealed and that : 

"No transient person shall solicit funds for charitable, veteran or 
fraternal purposes or solicit subscriptions for periodicals or shall 
solicit purchase orders and deposits for restoration or permanent 
preservations of personal articles of intrinsic value or photographs 
or portraits within the Town of Medfield without first having ob- 
tained a permit from the Board of Selectmen. 

"Application for said permit shall be filed with the Police Department 
in duplicate on forms provided by the Town. Immediately upon re- 
ceipt of an application, the Police Department shall transmit one 
copy to the Board of Selectmen, who shall hold a public hearing on 
said application at their next meeting. Notice of the purpose of said 
hearing shall be posted on the principal bulletin board of the Town. 
Within five hours of the conclusion of said hearing, the Board of 
Selectmen shall issue the permit, with such restrictions, conditions 
and limitations as they find necessary for the protection of the appli- 
cant and the citizens of the Town, unless they shall find that the 
applicant or applicants or their employees or agents are of a bad 
moral character or that the issuance of said permit will result in 
danger to the public safety or creation of a nuisance." 

be adopted as Section 28 of Article IV of the Town By-laws. 

ARTICLE 3. Voted that the sum of $3,940.28 be transferred from the 
balance of the funds appropriated in Article 15 of the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1971 and $1,535.95 be transferred from the balance of the 
funds appropriated in Article 42 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970, 
and $123.77 be transferred from the balance of the funds appropriated in 
Article 28 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970 to be used with funds 
provided by the Commonwealth and Norfolk County under the provi- 
sions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws for the reconstruction of West 
Street and that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into all necessary 
contracts for that purpose. 



288 



ARTICLE 4. Voted that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to 
execute releases to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in exchange 
for payment to the Town for those parcels of Town owned land taken by 
the Commonwealth for the construction of Route 27. 

ARTICLE 5. Voted that the sum of $10,000.00 be appropriated for the 
purpose of eliminatin gexcessive infiltration and repairing the sewer 
system and that to meet this appropriation $1,627.56 be transferred from 
the balance of the funds appropriated in Article 16 of the Special Town 
Meeting of October 27, 1969 and that $219.31 be transferred from the 
balance of the funds appropriated in Article 44 of the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1970 and that $1,292.18 be transferred from the balance of 
the funds appropriated in Article 46 of the Annual Town Meeting of 
1970 and that $526.72 be transferred from the balance of the funds ap- 
propriated in Article 13 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1971 and that 
$938.48 be transferred from the balance of the funds appropriated in 

Article 27 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1967 and that $1,351.39 be 
transferred from the balance of the funds appropriated in Article 34 
of the Annual Town Meeting of 1971 and that $128.77 be transferred 
from the balance of the funds appropriated in Article 34 of the Annual 
Town Meeting of 1969 and that $1,258.19 be transferred from the balance 
of the funds appropriated in Article 36 of the Annual Town Meeting 
of 1963 and $2,657.40 be transferred from the balance of funds appropri- 
ated in Article 4 of the Special Town Meeting of October 22, 1965. 

ARTICLE 6. Voted that a Regional Disposal Planning Committee be 
created in accordance with the provisions of Section 44A of Chapter 40 
of the Massachusetts General Laws and that the sum of $100.00 be trans- 
ferred from the balance of the funds appropriated in Article 28 of the 
Annual Town Meeting of 1971 for the expenses of this committee. 

ARTICLE 7. Voted to amend the Zoning By-law by deleting Section 9.3. 

Yes 235 

No 7 

ARTICLE 8. Voted that the provisions of Section 53C of Chapter 44 
of the Massachusetts General Laws be accepted and that the sum of 
$2,000.00 be transferred from Free Cash to a special account for the 
purposes of said section. 

ARTICLE 9. Voted to dismiss this article asking for an additional clas- 
sification of Police Officers be established. 

Yes 101 

No 119 

ARTICLE 10. Voted to dismiss this article asking to authorize the 
Board of Assessors to employ its own members as field appraisers, map 
reviewers, and agents. 



289 



ARTICLE 11. Voted to dismiss this article asking for a transfer from 
accounts in the Board of Assessors to finance the previous article. 
The following was [Hit before the meeting: 

In view of the danger to students from ix>lice cars, fire equip- 
ment, and other emergency vehicles that respond to bomb scares, 
the cost to the Town because of extended school sessions and the 
deteriorating effect on quality of education, it is hereby recommended 
that the School Committee direct the Guidance Department that 
should those responsible prove to be students, the fact tha the or 
she was involved in reporting false bomb scares will be included in 
his student record and be made part of his transcript when grades 
and personal data are being submitted for either college entrance or 
job referral. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:40 P.M. 



A True Copy, Attest 



XAXCY J. PRESTOX 



Town Clerk 



290 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 



TOWN OF MEDF1ELD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1972 



291 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Up-Date Appraising, 

Within the past year, the Board of Assessors on two occasions 
once at the Annual Town Meeting, and once at a special Town meeting 
— inserted articles in the Town Warrants to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to appoint one or more of its members to appraise and up-date 
the real and personal property within the Town. This request was made so 
as to allow the Board of Assessors, by direct authorization of the towns- 
people, to maintain an equal, fair and proportionate assessment of value 
on each and every property and its improvement. 

In the past two years, we, as your Assessors, have had a great deal 
of difficulty in locating a qualified professional up-date appraiser who has 
the specialized knowledge and the time to perform this task within the 
time period required by the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The Board assumed that if the Town so authorized one or more of its 
qualified members to perform this required function the work could 
be spread out over the entire year and not crammed into the first three 
months as it is presently being done. 

We also feel that in order to defend the values so assigned to each 
property that we, as Assessors, have a more direct first-hand knowl- 
edge as to the establishment of the value estimate in the first instance. 
We know that as residents of the Town we have a better understanding 
of the various forces that tend to influence values in dimerent sections 
of the community. 

The guide lines by which the value estimates are established for 
each property were developed by the New England Survey Service Inc. 
when they revalued the Town in 1967. This system is the one that is 
presently in use today and is utilized with religious zeal. 

The continued use of the above described pricing manual foregoes any 
possible personal interpellation or favoritism on the part of the Asses- 
sors and assures the public of unbiased assessments on their property. 

Revaluations. 

The time is rapidly approaching when the Town of Medfield must 
consider an entire revaluation program. Sales indicate assessments 
ranging from an average low of 58 % of market value to an average 
high of 85%. The reason for this vast discrepency in assessed value is 
not due to inequitable assessments in 1967 but has been caused by the 
greater appreciation in value of certain areas and neighborhoods, due 
to their location and surroundings. Land values are particularly out of 
line. After analyzing many land sales that have occurred within the 
past three years, the following becomes evident: 



292 



Percent of land sales analyzed Market to Assessed Value 

25% to 19% of market 

25% 30 to 39% of market 

42 % 40 to 70 7c of market 

8% 71 to 109% of market 

Mean average 41% of market 

The Board will, therefore, recommend a complete revaluation of all 
real and personal property for the Town of Medfield to commence at 
the completion of the upcoming eighteen-month change to the new 
fiscal year in June of 1974, and that during the eighteen-month period 
certain preparatory work be undertaken to prepare for bidding. 

Our customary report follows: 



Total Appropriations 




$ 4,583,491.26 


Overlay Deficits 






24.00 


School Lunch Program $ 


17,690.50 






Free Public Libraries 


3,682.88 






Natural Resources Self Help Program 


18,000.00 










$ 


39,373.38 


Land Damages 




$ 


5,998.87 


County Tax and Assessments: 








County Tax 




$ 


40,162.38 


State Tax and Assessments: 








State Recreation Areas $ 


17,067.87 






Audit of Municipal Accounts 


14,647.39 






Metropolitan Districts Area 


740.65 






Metropolitan Districts Area-Underest. 


291.74 






Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


56,984.00 






Mosquito Control Projects 


6,008.37 






Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 


866.25 










$ 


96,606.27 


Overlay 




$ 


44,133.10 


GROSS AMOUNT TO BE RAISED: 


$ 4,809,789.26 


Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 








1972 Estimated Receipts as certified by 








Commissioner on Cherry Sheet $1,048,706.56 






Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 


263,860.20 






Licenses 


18,918.94 






Fines 


3,264.50 






Special Assessments 


17,939.39 






General Government 


3,188.18 






School 


392.60 






Public Service Enterprises 


110,410.33 







293 



Interest: on taxes and assessments 8,439.67 

Farm Animal Excise 6.00 

Overestimates 5,672.04 

$ 1,480,798.41 



NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 

Tax Rate: $53.00. 

Personal Property: $ 1,568,355.00 $ 83,122.82 

Real Estate $61,242,790.00 3,245,868.03 


$ 3,328,990.85 


Water Betterments: 
Water Liens 


$62,811,145.00 


$3,328,990.85 

$ 3,500.07 

14,205.79 



$ 3,346,696.71 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH S. KENNEDY, Chairman 
MELVILLE J. MILLS 
ROGER E. HARDY 

Board of Assessors of Medfleld 



294 



PERPETUAL CARE FUND 

Milton Economos Lot $135.00 

Elmer Bolton Lot 600.00 

James Dumas Lot 100.00 

Thomas Howson Lot 50.00 

Frank Ferrone Lot 300.00 

Ralph Hess Lot 400.00 

Helen Mezzanotti Lot 400.00 

Erwin Seidel Lot 120.00 

Elfonso Fenoglio Lot 400.00 

Edward Baker Lot 400.00 

Warren & Jeanette Lovelace Lot 200.00 

Rennie Spring Lot 200.00 

Arthur Maguire Lot 400.00 

Eric Iafolla Lot 240.00 

Harry Webb Lot 400.00 

Wallace Good 70.00 

Laurence Fernald Lot 200.00 

Annie Riley Lot 10.00 

Mary Hughes 100.00 

Olive Bergstrom 100.00 

Florence Roberts Lot 120.00 

Rita Catenacci Lot 60.00 

Harold Robie Lot 800.00 

Jewell Knowles Lot 300.00 

Frederick Clement 25.00 

Mann- Wheeler Lot 200.00 



295 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 





1971 


1972 


1972 


Total 


Levy of 


Balance 


Collected 


Balance 


Balance 


1967 


118.00 


118.00 


.00 




196S 


536.50 


277.50 


259.00 




1969 


294.50 


285.00 


9.50 




1970 


517.72 


452.92 


64.80 




1971 


1.704.26 


1,563.08 


141.18 




1972 




81,451.42 
REAL ESTATE 


1,677.98 
TAXES 


2,152.46 




1966 


18.40 


.00 


18.40 




1967 


67.87 


.00 


67.87 




1968 


514.86 


255.67 


259.19 




1969 


2,887.38 


1,856.72 


1,030.66 




1970 


8,025.64 


3,263.08 


4,762.56 




1971 


92,143.39 


79,291.30 


12,852.09 




1972 




3,164,341.05 


81,526.98 


100,517.75 






WATER LIENS ADDED TO TAXES 




1967 


65.76 


.00 


65.76 




1969 


99.35 


.00 


99.35 




1970 


1,030.48 


48.00 


982.48 




1971 


1,762.47 


837.96 


924.51 




1972 




12,345.40 


1,860.39 


3,932.49 






MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE TAXES 




1966 


16.50 


16.50 


.00 




1967 


176.55 


176.55 


.00 




1968 


438.41 


359.76 


78.65 




1969 


635.87 


140.53 


495.34 




1970 


3,113.79 


1,426.12 


1,687.67 




1971 


28,384.49 


24,981.09 


3,403.40 




1972 




192,761.67 


29,763.73 


35,428.79 




Total Interest Collected 


on Delinquent Taxes . 


5,232.94 


Total Fees Collected on 


Certificates of Lien 


2,152.00 


Percentage of 1972 Taxes Collected 




96.8% 








Respectfully submitted, 








CHARLES H. RAYNER, JR. 








Collector of Taxes 





296 



REPORT OF TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

For the year ending December 31, 1972 
RECEIPTS 

Balance Cash on Hand Janury 1, 1972 $ 379,200.43 

Taxes: 

Current year $3,211,148.70 

Previous years 85,931.22 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 234,170.69 

Water and Sewer Betterments 21,583.79 

Tax Interest & Certification of Liens 7,384.94 

State Tax — Local Aid 139,161.86 

State Income Tax — (Chapter 69 ) 39,602.69 

Tax Titles 4,852.50 

Farm Animal Excise Tax 6.58 

$3,743,842.97 



Licenses and Permits : 




Gas Permits 


$ 797.00 


Wiring Permits 


1,842.50 


Building Permits 


3,213.50 


Plumbing Permits 


1,664.00 


Swimming Pool Permits 


2,145.25 


Other Licenses and Refunds 


890.90 


Street Listings and Executive Dept. 


Licenses 5,812.17 


Veteran Aid Refunds 


2,500.00 


Health Permits 


1,524.00 


Grants from State and County : 




State Hospital Land 


$ 7,298.03 


Schools — Building Program 


204,049.93 


Schools — Other 


605,951.17 


Highways — State & County Aid 


151,135.39 


Community Affairs 


1,000.00 


State Lottery Aid 


31,378.47 


Veterans' Services 


10,549.15 


Water Pollution 


91,715.00 


Library — Dog Tax 


1,929.62 



$ 20,389.32 



$1,105,006.76 



Departmental Revenue : 

Charter Commission $ 13.21 

Planning Board 709.24 

Sealers' Fees 190.90 

Fire Department 148.32 

Town Clerk 121.50 

School — Sales of Materials, etc. 1,222.45 

Appeals Board — Hearings 250.00 

Ambulance Fees 2,979.00 



297 



Library Finos and Refunds 


1,716.10 






Court Fines 


1,683.00 






Cancelled Checks 


69.59 






Blue Cross Insurance Refund 


4,093.48 






Accrued Interest 


13.33 










$ 


13,210.12 


Grants and Refunds from Federal Government: 






Public Law 88-210 — Schools 


$15,631.35 






Smith Hughes — Barden Schools 


8,264.00 










$ 


23,895.35 


Water Department : 








Sale of Water 


$108,709.39 






Water Services 


7,172.35 










$ 


115,881.74 


Cemetery : 








Sale of Lets and Graves, etc. 




$ 


3,032.00 


Interest on Trust Funds: 








Library 


$ 512.19 






Granville F. Dailey ■ — Library 


3,546.39 






Cemetery Perpetual Care 


2,581.23 






Clara S. Littledale — Library 


110.47 










$ 


6,750.28 


Loans: 








Anticipation Tax Revenue 


$1,900,000.00 






Highway 


76,926.00 






Sewer Extension 


150,168.00 






Conservation Fund Investment 


200,000.00 










$2.& 


Reserve Fund : 








School — Adult Education 


$ 4,741.00 






School — Athletic Association 


5,745.54 






School Cafeteria 


148,343.44 






Library Trust Funds 


100.00 






Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 


6,330.00 






Conservation Fund & Sale Land 


23,150.00 






Dog Licenses 


3,817.45 






Group Insurance — Agency Funds 


48,922.81 






County Retirement Funds 


29,041.91 






Teachers' Insurance Funds 


32,318.52 






Federal Withholding Taxes 


444,042.94 






State Withholding Taxes 


116,657.48 






Teachers' Retirement Funds 


104,244.93 










$ 


967,456.02 


Federal Revenue Sharing 




$ 
$8 


47,277.00 


Total Receipts and Cash on Hand 


[,753,035.99 



298 



EXPENDITURES 1972 



General Government : 




Executive 


$22,226.31 


Executive Secretary 


14,374.30 


Treasurer 


10,411.42 


Town Accountant 


5,767.69 


Collector 


11,922.90 


Assessors 


23,142.89 


Town Clerk 


3,065.81 


Election & Registrations 


8,090.65 


Town Hall 


16,536.60 


Legal 


6,104.61 


Finance Board 


882.64 


Planning Board 


4,272.11 


Personnel Board 


518.68 


Assessors' Plans 


3,230.00 


Housing Study Committee 


4,000.00 


Town Garage 


5,808.18 




S 140.404.79 


Protection of Persons & Property : 




Gas Inspector 


S 1,051.00 


Plumbing Inspector 


1,594.50 


Wiring Inspector 


2,060.00 


Building Inspector 


7,488.13 


Police 


157,140.29 


Fire 


35,470.07 


Sealer 


256.82 


Moth Control 


9,171.39 


Care of Trees 


7,195.09 


Mosquito Spray- 


533.00 


Dutch Elm Disease 


2,166.27 


Ambulance 


4,050.94 


Police Cruiser Purchase 


7,948.59 


Dog Officer 


1,458.37 


Civil Defense 


972,18 


School Traffic — Police 


9,256.52 


Police Transmitter 


4,190.24 




S 252,003.40 


Health & Sanitation: 




District Nurse 


S 2,025.00 


Health 


5,955.09 


Sewer 


7,038.12 


Public Dump — Landfill 


18,851.64 


Garbage Removal 


19,000.00 


Sewer — Extensions 


149,020.00 




S 201.889.85 



299 



Highways: 






Highways 


.$101,445.80 




Highways — Chapter S! 


23,644.08 




Traffic Guide Lines 


5,455.08 




Snow & Sanding 


58,482.00 




Green Street 


1,084.82 




Chapter 90 — Highways - Route 27 


110,908.20 




Street Lighting 


15,839.34 




Truck Purchase 


17,394.00 




Sidewalks 


1,286.92 


$ 335,540.24 


Veterans' Benefits: 






Veterans' Services and Aid 




$ 23,235.33 


School and Library: 






Schools 


S2, 789,449.48 




Vocational Education 


9,959.20 




Athletic Association 


4,994.45 




Cafeteria 


149,837.90 




Library 


32,523.98 




Norwood Mental Health Center 


3,700.00 




Junior-Senior High School 


10,662.76 




Adult Education 


8,509.90 




Amos C. Kingsbury Building 


114,460.00 




Public Law 89-210 


39,898.43 




Planning Committee 


867.03 


$3,164,863.13 


Water and Cemetery : 






Water Extensions 


$37,245.02 




Water 


59,555.65 




Cemetery 


12,845.94 


$ 109,646.61 


Miscellaneous : 






Tax Interest — Refunds 


$ 4.29 




Charter Commission 


75.23 




Memorial Day 


750.00 




Appeals Board 


442.17 




Real Estate Tax — Refunds 


10,485.51 




Parks 


6,570.92 




Town Meetings 


1,848.01 




Town Report 


4,960.06 




Motor Excise Tax — Refunds 


9,323.06 




County Retirement System 


38,604.42 




Camp — Handicapped Children 


667.04 




Water Assessments — Refunds 


223.56 




Aging Committee 


1,001.75 




Conservation Board 


758.00 




Christmas Decorations 


103.64 




Master Plan 


1,500.00 




Swimming Pond 


12,252.70 





'MX) 



Recreation — Youth Program 


6,226.18 






Skating Pond 


480.00 










$ 


96,276.54 


State and County Taxes: 








Park & Reservations 


$14,422.63 






County Tax 


42,276.67 






State Audit 


14,647.39 






Mosquito Control 


6,802.00 






Motor Excise Tax Bills 


866.25 






Metropolitan Planning 


421.40 






Metropolitan Boston T. A. 


56,810.29 






State Air Pollution 


285.49 










$ 


136,532.12 


Town Debt: 








Maturing Debt 


$ 372,600.00 






Temporary Loans 


1,900,000.00 






Interest 


200,417.80 






Highway Loans 


58,650.00 






Sewer Extension Loans 


175,537.80 










$2.7( 


Insurance: 








Vehicle Liability Insurance 


$ 4,704.00 






Workmen's Compensation 


11,672.00 






Group Accident & Life 


47,254.86 






Property Insurance 


9,645.00 










$ 


73,275.86 


Trust Funds or Agency Funds : 








Cancelled Checks 


$ 50.85 






Planning Board 


2,300.00 






Library Trusts 


143.00 






Dog Taxes 


3,835.45 






Federal Withholding Taxes 


444,042.94 






State Sales Tax 


192.48 






Group Accident & Life Insurance 


51,478.68 






Conservation Funds 


5,045.05 






Cemetery Funds 


6,330.00 






State Withholding Taxes 


116,657.48 






County Retirement 


26,141.61 






Mass. Teachers' Insurance & 








Retirement Funds 


136,563.45 










$ 


792,780.99 


Federal Revenue Sharing 




$ 


47,277.00 


Cash on Hand and in Bank : 






December 31, 1972 




$ 


672,104.53 


Total Expenditures and Cash on Hand 


$8,753,035.99 



301 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 



January 1, 197S 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 








$3,609,600.00 


Outside Debt Limits: 










Junior-Senior High School 






$ :>25,000.00 




Memorial School 






60,000.00 




Memorial School Addition 






275,000.00 




Elementary School 






1,070,000.00 




Ralph Wheelock School 






1,360,000.00 


$3,290,000.00 


Inside Debt Limit: 










Smith Pumping Station 






$120,000.00 




Fire Station 






15,000.00 




Elm Street Highways 






34,600.00 




Sewer Extension 






150,000.00 


$ 319,600.00 


DEBT BY 


YEAR 


OF MATURITY 






(Principal) 






1973 $380,600.00 






1981 


$200,000.00 


1974 374,000.00 






1982 


200,000.00 


1975 360,000.00 






1983 


195,000.00 


1976 335,000.00 






1984 


170,000.00 


1977 305,000.00 






1985 


85,000.00 


1978 275,000.00 






1986 


85,000.00 


1979 275,000.00 






1987 


85,000.00 


1980 200,000.00 






1988 


85,000.00 


TRUST ACCOUNTS 






PRINCIPAL 







Balance — December 31, 1972 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer : 
Library — Granville F. Dailey 

Trust Funds $ 89,328.34 

Library — Clara S. Littledale Trust Funds 2,253.50 

Library Trust Funds 9,000.00 

Cemetery Perpetual Trust Funds 74,760.00 

Stabilization Fund 255,337.81 

Conservation Fund 2,075.50 

Federal Revenue Sharing 47,277.00 



$ 486,062.27 



$ 480,032.15 



In Custody of Selectmen: 
Moses Ellis Post No. 



117 G.A.It. 



6,030.12 



302 



INCOME & DISBURSEMENTS 

Library Trust Income : 

Interest on Savings Accounts 

Dedham Institution for Savings 
Provident Institution for Savings 
Union-Warren Savings Bank 



Transfer to Library 

Balance — January 1, 1972 
Interest on Savings Accounts 



$110.48 






284.21 






103.75 








S 
S 


498.44 




498.44 




s 


100.39 
124.22 



Balance — December 31, 1972 S 224.61 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds Income : 

Balance — January 1, 1972 S 134.17 

Union- Warren Savings Bank S 660.54 

Dedham Institution for Savings 1,430.41 

Home Savings Bank 281.28 

Needham Cooperative Bank 209.00 

$ 2,581.23 



Balance — December 31, 1972 S 2,715.40 

Granville F. Dailey Library Trust-Income : 

Balance — January 1, 1972 S 6,126.30 

C.I.T. Corporation S 138.76 

Dedham Institution for Savings 1,155.39 

U.S. Treasury Bonds 125.00 

Appalachian Power Company 185.00 

General Electric Company 140.00 

General Motors Corporation 130.00 

Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation 72.50 

Southwestern Gas & Electric 185.00 

Southern California-Edison 312.50 

International Bank Reconst. & Dev. 90.00 

American Tel. & Tel. Company 175.00 

Ohio Power Company 138.76 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R.R. 200.00 

New England Telephone 138.76 

Southern Bell Telephone 131.26 

Armco Steel Corporation 174.00 

Newton Savings Bank 599.67 

$ 4,091.60 



Total Receipts S 10,217.90 



303 



Transfer to Library 
Commission Paid & Reserves 



1 1.82 
545.21 



$ 3,887.03 



Halanct 



December 31. 1972 



6.330.87 



Balance Sheet — December 31, 1972 



Cash in Banks and Office 

Accounts Receivable: 
Tax Levy 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes : 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 

Special Assessments: 
Water: Betterments 
Levy: 1967 
1969 
1970 
1972 
Committed Interest 

Special Taxes in Litigation 
Tax Titles and Possessions : 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 

Departmental Accounts Receivable 
Ambulance 

Cemetery Annual Care 
Cemetery Sale of Lots 





$ 


672,104.53 


$ 18.40 






67.87 






518.19 






1,040.16 






4,827.36 






12,993.27 






83,204.96 








$ 


102,670.21 


$ 78.65 






495.34 






1,687.67 






3,403.40 






29,763.73 








$ 


35,428.79 


54.24 






31.00 






8,775.02 






149.36 






497.23 








$ 


9,506.85 




$ 


3,353.01 


8,285.43 






525.25 








$ 


8,810.68 


$2,762.00 






5,041.00 






240.00 


$ 


8.043.00 



304 



Water: Liens Added to Taxes 








Levy: 1967 


S 65.76 






1969 


99.35 






1970 


982.48 






1971 


924.51 






1972 


2,084.19 






Rates 


22,590.90 






Services 


6,799.35 






Sales & Use Tax 


629.42 










$ 


34,175.96 


Aid to Highways : 








State 


$5,009.87 






County 


2,022.94 










$ 


7,032.81 


Loans Authorized: 








Sewer 1970 


§4,750,000.00 






Water 1965 


1,400.00 










$4,75 


Unprovided for: 








Overlay: 1967 


$118.00 






1969 


10.11 






1971 


70.48 






Dog Tax 


66.00 






State Mosquito Control 


160.16 






Air Pollution 


567.72 










$ 


992.47 


Federally Aided Projects : 








Schools: Vocational Education 


$2,581.00 






Adult Education 


237.05 










$ 


2,818.05 








TOTAL ASSETS 


$5,636,336.36 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



State & County Assessments : 








State: MBTA 


$ 994.77 






Parks & Reservations 


4,900.25 






Metropolitan Planning District 


601.48 






County Tax 


1,939.74 










$ 


8,436.24 


Payroll Deductions : 








Retirement Plans 


$3,448.61 






Group Insurance 


976.37 










-$ 


4,424.98 


Guarantee Deposits: 








Planning Board 




$ 


12,211.91 


Agency: 








Water Sales Taxes 




$ 


386.35 



305 



Tailings: Unclaimed Check 

Trust Fund Income: 



3,189.43 



Conservation 


$ 104.95 






Libra: \ 


7.136.52 






Cemetery 


2,715.40 











$ 


9,956.87 


Federal Grants : 








Occupational Education 1 J/ L 89.576 


$5,122.01 






Schools P/L 88.210 


32.20 






Titles I. II. Ill & V 


3.620.70 










$ 


8,774.91 


Revolving Funds: 








School Cafeteria 


$ 231.28 






School Athletic Association 


4,054.74 










$ 


4,286.02 


Appropriation Balances : 








Town Garage 


$139,780.57 






Conservation Commission 


18,672.64 






Schools 


108,278.85 






Highways 


31,820.56 






Police 


9,034.08 






Sewer & Water Extension 


52,378.00 






All Other 


17.912.76 










$ - 


377.877.36 


Loans Authorized and Unissued 




$4,751,400.00 


Sale of Real Estate 




$ 


3,000.00 


Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 




$ 


1,194.43 


Overlays Reserved for Abatements 








Levy: 1966 


$ 341.46 






1968 


6,845.00 






1970 


4,987.12 






1972 


1,075.69 










$ 


13,249.27 


Revenue Reserved Until Collected : 








Motor Vehicle Excise 


$35,428.79 






Special Assessment 


10,496.46 






Special Tax 


3,353.01 






Tax Title and Possession 


8,810.68 






Departmental 


8,043.00 






Water 


31,135.58 






Aid to Highways 


7,032.81 










$ 


104,300.33 


Surplus Revenue 




$ 


333,648.26 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $5,636,336.36 

The foregoing report is an account of the financial transactions and 

standing of the Town of Medfield for the year ending December 31, 1972. 

LESLIE J. HOWLETT 
Town Accountant 



306 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

NORFOLK, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, in said County, 
greetings : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elec- 
tions and in town affairs to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, 
on Monday, the fifth day of March A.D., 1973 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then 
and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually 
by ballot, viz : 

One Moderator for one year. 

Two members of the Park and Recreation Commission for two years. 

One Town Clerk, One Selectman, One Assessor, One Member of the 

School Committee, two Trustees of the Public Library, two members 

of the Park and Recreation Commission, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing 

Authority, both for five years. 

QUESTION OF PUBLIC POLICY 

"Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year nineteen 
hundred and seventy-two, entitled 'An Act removing the office of 
chief of police of the town of Medfield from the civil service 
law and rules', be accepted?" 

Yes □ No Q 

The polls will be opened at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 
8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twelfth day of March A.D. 1973 commencing at 7:30 
P.M., the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School Gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or trans- 
fer from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any 
other Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operat- 
ing expenses of the Town for the eighteen-month period commencing 
January 1, 1973, or such other sums as the Town may determine as re- 
quired by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 



307 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, 

with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow in anticipation of the 
revenue for the eighteen month period beginning January 1, 1973 in ac- 
cordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and acts in amend- 
ment thereof, and including in addition thereto, Chapter 849 of the Acts 
of 1969. as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chap- 
ter 44, Section 17 or take any other action relative thereto. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Collector to use all 
means In the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to 
that office. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compen- 
sation of the following elected officers : 

Moderator 

Town Clerk 

Treasurer 

Selectmen 

Assessors 

School Committee 

Trustees of Public Library 

Collector of Taxes 

Planning Board 

Park and Recreation Commissioners 

Housing Authority 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money 
from the Revenue Sharing Account to defray certain portions of the sew- 
erage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities approved 
under Article 15 of the Special Town Meeting on November 16, 1970, or 
for some other purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Classifications 
of Positions and Pay Schedules of the Personnel Administration Plan so 
that it reads as follows: 

CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

FULL TIME POSITIONS 

RATE RANGE 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

*Chief Annual 12,500 to 16,500 

Sergeant Annual 10,130 10,550 11,080 

Patrolman Annual 7,660 8,240 8,820 9,495 10,130 



308 



4.30 


4.55 


4.80 


5.05 


3.90 


4.10 


4.35 


4.60 


3.65 


3.90 


4.15 


4.35 


3.40 


3.65 


3.90 


4.15 


2.65 


2.75 


2.90 


3.05 



STREET DEPARTMENT 

*Supt'd't. Annual 13,500 to 16,500 
Foreman Hourly 4.00 
Equip. Oper. 

Hourly 3.65 
Heavy Equip. 
Operator Hourly 3.40 
Light Equip. 

Operator Hourly 3.15 
Laborer Hourly 2.55 

Snow Removal Premium: 50 per cent of hourly rate for time worked 

other than normal schedule. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

*Chief Annual 10,500 to 13,500 

WATER & SEWER DEPT. 

Foreman Hourly 4.00 4.30 4.55 4.80 5.05 

Water Tech- 
nician Hourly 3.40 3.65 3.90 4.15 4.35 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 
* Executive 



Secretary Annual 


13,000 to 


18,000 








Administrative 












Secretary Annual 


6,380 


6,820 


7,260 


7,660 


8,080 


Custodian : 












Town Hall Hourly 


2.35 


2.45 


2.55 


2.65 


2.75 


GENERAL 












Sr. Sec'y. Hourly 


2.95 


3.15 


3.35 


3.55 


3.75 


CoU./Bkpr. 












Secretary Hourly 


2.55 


2.70 


2.85 


3.00 


3.15 



Full-time employees shall receive an annual longevity payment of 
$50.00 after 5 years continuous full-time employment plus S10.00 for 
each additional year of service up to a total maximum of $200.00. 
payable on the 2nd pay day of December. 

REGULAR PART TIME POSITIONS 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 










Custodian : 










' 


Town Hall Hourly 


2.35 


2.45 


2.55 


2.65 


2.75 


LIBRARY 












Librarian Annual 


5,115 


5,445 


5,940 


6,240 


6,550 


Asst. Libr. Annual 


2.860 


3,025 


3,190 


3,365 


3,550 



Children's 

Librarian Annual 2,860 3,025 3,190 3,365 3,550 



309 



RATE RANGE 

Position Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 

GENERAL 
Coll./Bkpr. 
Secretary Hourly 2.55 2.70 2.&5 3.00 3.15 

TAX DEPARTMENT 
Deputy Coll. and 

Bookk'per. Hourly 2.55 2.75 2.95 3.15 3.35 

•Indicates a salaried position not subject to overtime payment. 

PART TIME AND TEMPORARY POSITIONS 

Position Rate 

Ambulance Attendant $3.50 per hour 

Ambulance Serviceman $2.35 per run subject to $23.50 min. per month 

Animal Inspector $400 per year 

Beach : Water Front Director $1,300 to $1,600 per year 

Asst. Water Front Director $75. to $100. per week 

Swimming Instructor $2.30 per hour 

Lifeguard Instructor $70 to $90 per week 

Lifeguard $55 to $80 per week 

Maintenance Man $50 to $60 per week 

Skating Program Director $3.70 per hour 

Skating Supervisor S3.20 per hour 

Building Inspector $5.80 per inspection — $1,135. min. per year 

Building Inspector (Acting) $5.80 per inspection — $155. min. per year 

Cemetery: Foreman $2.65 per hour 

Clerk : Typist $2.00 to $2.65 per hour 
Deputy Collector Fee 

Dog Officer $800. per year plus $1. for each delinquent lie. 

Fire: Call Firefighters $3.50 to $3.65 per hour 

Deputy Chief $625. per year 

Captain $210. per year 

Lieutenant $160. per year 

Clerk $160. per year 

Gas Inspector $5.80 per inspection — $310. min. per year 

Gas Inspector (Acting) $5.80 per inspection — — $55. min. per year 

Laborer $1.65 to $2.55 per hour 

Library: Aide $1.50 to $2.35 per hour 

Senior Aide S2.40 to $2.65 per hour 

Junior Aide $1.25 to $1.60 per hour 

Custodian & Maintenance $1 ,550 to $2,050 per year 

Planning Board Assistant $2.30 to $2.90 per hour 

Playground Counselor $30. per week 

Playground Director $90. to $120. per week 

Plumbing Inspector $5.80 per inspection — $930. min. per year 

Plumbing Inspector (Acting) $5.80 per inspectio n — $210. min. per year 



310 



Police Matron S2.65 to 33.15 per hour 

Poll Worker $2.30 per hour 

Recreation Coordinator $60. to $75. per week 

Registrar $115. per year 

Registrar, Clerk $250. per year 

Sanitation Inspector S3. 50 per inspection 

Sealer of Weights and Measures $165. per year 

Secretary $2.30 to $2.90 per hour 

Special Police Officer $3.50 per hour 

Town Accountant $3,270 per year 

Town Counsel $2,320 to $5,800 per year 

Traffic Supervisor $2.70 to $3.20 per hour 

Tree Warden/Insect Pest Control $4.30 per hour 

Tree Climber $2.50 to $4.00 per hour 

Truck Driver $2.50 to $3.25 per hour 

Veterans' Agent $1,045 per year 
Wiring Inspector $5.80 per inspection — $515. min. per year 
Wiring Inspector (Acting) $5.80 per inspection — S155. min. per year 

When an hourly paid employee is called in to work on an emergency 
assignment, he shall receive no less than two (2) hours pay at his 
straight time hourly rate. This does not apply to planned overtime. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend paragraph 4 of 
Section 12 of the Personnel Administration Plan to read as follows: 

"Vacations with pay shall not be granted to temporary employ- 
ees, whether full or part-time, except to those who have been con- 
tinuously employed for 6 months. Continuous employment beyond 
6 months must be authorized by the Department Head and the 
Personnel Board." 

and to add the following paragraph to Section 15 of the Personnel Ad- 
ministration Plan: 

"Holidays with pay shall not be granted to temporary employees, 
whether full or part-time, except to those who have been continu- 
ously employed for 6 months. Continuous employment beyond 
6 months must be authorized by the Department Head and the 
Personnel Board." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 16 of the 
Personnel Administration Plan by adding "or special police detail" to the 
last paragraph; and to amend section 14.b. of the Personnel Administra- 
tion Plan so as to read as follows: 

"b. An employee in continuous employment shall be credited 
with the unused portion of sick leave granted under sub- 
sectoin a. up to a maximum of ninety (90) days." 

311 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. (.Personnel Board) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 40, Sec- 
tion 8G of the Massachusetts General Laws as amended, or take any 
other action relative thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money to purchase films and 
equipment for the use of the Police Department Safety Education Pro- 
gram, or do or act anything in relation thereto. ( Police Department ) 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purchase of a 
radar timer for the Police Department, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to appoint a committee to study and make recommendations 
on the need for a Police Station and facilities and to study and make 
recommendations on the future use of Town Hall facilities, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. (Police Department) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars ($1,500.00) as the Town's Chapter 90 
share for the maintenance of Chapter 90 roads; said funds to be used with 
funds allotted by the County and State, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or borrow and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money as the 
Town's Chapter 90 share for the reconstruction of a section of West Street 
and a section of Bridge Street in the vicinity of West Street, and to 
authorize the Selectmen to enter into any and all contracts necessary 
or incidental thereto, said money to be used with funds allotted by the 
County and State, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

AR.TICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the 
following named street, or part thereof: 

Colonial Road from Station 15 +04 to Station 19 +80. 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred 
to in the Order of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's Office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or 
otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements 
as may be necessary to accomplish such purpose, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

( Board of Selectmen ) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purchase of a sidewalk plow for the Highway De- 
partment and to authorize the Selectmen to trade a 1958 sidewalk tractor 



312 



as part of the purchase price, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen ) 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purchase of a mowing machine for the Highway 
Department and to authorize the Selectmen to trade a 1946 Ford Tractor 
as part of the purchase price, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purchase of a salt spreader for the Highway De- 
partment, or do or act anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of converting the Town Yard in the rear 
of the Town Hall to a municipal parking area, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for purchasing radios and base station for the Highway 
Department or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer a sum of money for the purpose of providing recreation for 
the physically and mentally handicapped, or do or act anything in rela- 
tion thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 24. To hear and act on the reports of any special committee 
appointed at any previous Special Town Meeting or Annual Town Meet- 
ing or appointed by the Moderator or Selectmen as authorized by the 
vote of the Town. (Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to appoint a committee to plan and carry out the celebration 
of the Three Hundred and Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Incorporation 
of the Town of Medfield in 1976, and to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money therefor, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 26. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the pur- 
pose of replacing the 1954 chassis for the 1954 forest truck of the Fire 
Department, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

ARTICLE 27. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate and/or borrow and/or transfer from available funds for the purpose 
of providing a vehicle for the Fire Chief, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. (Fire Department) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money to continue the updating of the Master Plan relative to the 



313 



Inventory and Evaluation of Land Use, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a 
sum of money to continue the updating of the Master Plan relative to 
the Recreation and Conservation Plan, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money for the purpose of im- 
proving Metacomet Park, or take any action relative thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition Boston Edison Company to install a street light on 
pole 22 on Green Street, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition Boston Edison Company to install street lighting 
on Hartford Street at the entrance to Rocky Woods Reservation, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money for extraordinary repairs to the Memorial School roof under the 
prvoisions of Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, or otherwise, and determine 
whether such sum shall be raised in part by borrowing, by transferring 
from the stabilization fund or other available funds or otherwise, or take 
any other action relative thereto. (School Committee) 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for 
the reduction of the Tax Rate, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator 
to appoint a committee of five (5) members and authorize it to make 
arrangements and to spend money appropriated under Article 3 for the 
observance of Memorial Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen ) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named 
sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake 
Cemetery, the interest thereof or as may be necessary to be used for 
said care, viz: 

Milton Economos Lot $135.00 

Elmer Bolton Lot 600.00 

James Dumas Lot 100.00 

Thomas Howson Lot 50.00 

Frank Fcrrone Lot 300.00 

Ralph Hess Lot 400.00 

Helen Mezzanotte Lot 400.00 



314 



Erwin Seidel Lot 


120.00 


Elfonso Fenoglio Lot 


400.00 


Edward Baker Lot 


400.00 


Warren and Jeanette Lovelace Lot 


200.00 


Rennie Spring Lot 


200.00 


Arthur Maguire Lot 


400.00 


Eric Iafolla Lot 


240.00 


Harry Webb Lot 


400.00 


Wallace Good Lot 


70.00 


Laurence Fern aid Lot 


200.00 


Annie Riley Lot 


10.00 


Mary Hughes Lot 


100.00 


Olive Bergstrom Lot 


100.00 


Florence Roberts Lot 


120.00 


Rita Catenacci Lot 


60.00 


Harold Robie Lot 


800.00 


Jewell Knowles Lot 


360.00 


Frederick Clement Lot 


25.00 


Mann- Wheeler Lot 


200.00 



And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, 
seven days at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your do- 
ings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting afore- 
said. 

Given under our hand this sixth day of February, A.D., Nineteen 
Hundred and Seventy-three. 

HARRY A. KELLEHER 
WESTON G. KOLSTT 
JOSEPH L. MAROONEHTE 

Selectmen of Medfield 



315 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 5 

Appointments by Board of Health 16 

Appointments by Collector 17 

Appointments by Fire Chief 17 

Appointments by Planning Board 15 

Appointments by Selectmen 7 

Appointments by Town Clerk 17 

Appointments by Town Moderator 16 

Appointments by Treasurer 17 

Departmental Reports: 

Aging. Council on 80 

Ambulance 58 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 67 

Building Code Committee 94 

Cemetery Commission 74 

Charter 35 

Civil Defense 58 

Conservation Commission 73 

Dog Officer 91 

Fire Department 56 

Health, Board of 75 

Housing Authority 72 

Inspector of Animals 91 

Inspector of Buildings 92 

Inspector of Gasfittings 94 

Inspector of Plumbing 95 

Inspector of Wires 96 

Jury List 87 

Master Plan Implementation Committee 66 

Memorial Library 69 

Library Trustees 68 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 86 

Park and Recreation Commission 82 

Planning Board 60 

Police Department 50 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 96 

Selectmen, Board of 21 

Streets, Superintendent of 48 

Veterans' Services 86 

Voting Precincts 33 

Water and Sewerage Department 59 



3.16 



INDEX 

Page 
School Departmental Reports 

Adult Education 132 

Amos Clark Kingsbury School 125 

Athletics Director 133 

Buildings and Grounds Director 139 

Dale Street School 120 

Ralph Wheelock School 121 

Enrollment by Grade 118 

Junior High School 123 

Graduation Exercises, High School 126 

Guidance Report 129 

Memorial Elementary School 118 

Occupational Education 131 

School Calendar 113 

School Committee 101 

School Health Department 136 

School Lunch Program 134 

Superintendent of Schools 102 

Teachers' Director 103 

Town Clerk's Record: 

Births 143 

Marriages 147 

Deaths • 154 

Town Meetings and Elections: 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, March 6, 1972 157 

Annual Town Election, March 6, 1972 229 

Proceedings of Town Meeting, March 13, 1972 232 

Warrant for Presidential Primary 251 

Presidential Primary 253 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting, May 15, 1972 259 

Proceedings of Special Town Meeting, May 15, 1972 264 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting, June 19, 1972 270 

Proceedings of Special Town Meeting, June 19, 1972 272 

Warrant for State Primary, September 19, 1972 272 

State Primary, September 19, 1972 274 

Warrant for State Election, November 7, 1972 276 

State Election, November 7, 1972 281 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting, December 11, 1972 285 

Proceedings of Special Town Meeting, December 11, 1972 288 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting — 1973 307 

Financial Reports: 

Assessors' Reports 292 

Perpetual Care 295 

Tax Collector 296 

Town Accountant , 297 



317